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Immortal Iron Fist (Volume 1): The Last Iron Fist Story Paperback – 14 Nov 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics; First Edition edition (14 Nov 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785124896
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785124894
  • Product Dimensions: 0.7 x 16.5 x 25.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 347,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Killbetter on 28 Aug 2008
Format: Paperback
I must admit that I'd only ever come across Iron Fist as a guest character in old comic books. I kinda got the message that he was a kung fu master and if he had any super-powers he never seemed to use them. Not really a character that would tempt me to buy a collection of his recent solo material. But then, through reviews and word of mouth, I heard whisperings that Immortal Iron Fist was a seriously good read, so I thought I'd try it out. I'm glad I did.

Immortal Iron Fist is a very nicely characterised and very very nicely drawn story. Although Danny Rand (Iron Fist) is drawn from the Batman/Iron Man template as a millionaire businessman with superhero aspirations, the characterization by Ed Brubaker and Matt Fraction makes him a more likeable lead character than his better known counterparts. Unlike Bruce Wayne's see-sawing jet-setter/grim detective persona or Tony Stark's alpha-male businessman, Rand is written consistantly as somewhat bumbling and ditzy but with a strong moral drive, making him a likeable, personable lead. The supporting cast, particularly the always welcome presence of fellow '70s dude Luke Cage, is also used to great effect.

In addition to strong writing, the artwork by David Aja is fantastic. Staying just on the sketchy side of photorealism, Aja has a very adept use of shadow and a real artist's grasp of anatomy, giving the story a dark and realistic feeling depsite the enjoyably silly subject matter.

The story presented here is nothing special but, like The Ultimates, it's really an excuse to enjoy spending time with the characters. To be honest, I think I could happily buy a book consisting of Iron Fist and Power Man chatting over coffee if Matt Fraction would do the dialogue and David Aja would draw it.

I would recommend this book to anyone wanting a good old fashioned kung fu superhero yarn brought up to date in a very satisfying manner.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By K. A. Mason on 21 Mar 2008
Format: Paperback
I remember reading Iron Fist stories when I was younger and enjoyed them, the character falling on hard times with poor stories and unsuccessful launch after unsuccessful launch. Then the character was given to Ed Brubaker and once again it's enjoyable. This is a Iron Fist story with it's roots in the past, but very much a here and now story. It's full of action and had a great pace to it, the art is stylised but suits this story well and both new and old readers alike will enjoy this fast paced action story. I'd recommend it to anyone and it's well worth the asking price.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sam on 6 Nov 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is a solid read, if not truly inspirational. While not as exhilirating as his work on Captain America, Ed Brubaker sets a good pace, throws in some new twists and angles on the Iron Fist Mythos, then introduces us to, what i hope will be, a fitting climax. It may be called the last Iron Fist story but it could concievably be the first. Although Danny Rand's (AKA Iron Fist) origin is covered only briefly, the expansion of the origin of the 'Iron Fist' more than makes up for any shortcomings in the story. The arts great, but i was especially taken by some of re-imagininings (is that even a word) of the original images from the 70s Iron Fist. I'm a real fan of Ed's style so i won't gush on too much. Having said that he's not not bullet proof (see Shiar Empire) but if your a fan of his work, you'll like this. If your an old fan of Iron Fist (as i was) you'll also like it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 50 REVIEWER on 6 May 2014
Format: Paperback
I’m a huge fan of Matt Fraction and David Aja’s multi-Eisner Award-winning Hawkeye series so when I saw an earlier book they’d done together - with Ed Brubaker, no less! - I jumped at it. That said, having read Immortal Iron Fist Vol 1 just a couple of days ago, I’m really struggling to remember what the book was about - and I’m not sure I had such a great handle on it while I was reading it in the first place!

This might be partly because I have no history with the Iron Fist character. His hands flame, he knows kung-fu, and he’s the sometime partner of Luke Cage - that’s about it. I don’t know what his powers mean so maybe picking up a book entitled “The Last Iron Fist Story” wasn’t the best place to start, but whatever. Also, while I like Fraction’s latest output, I haven’t always been the guy’s champion - his early stuff at Marvel really stinks, and Brubaker sometimes doesn’t bring his A-game to everything he writes, and I think that’s why Immortal Iron First Vol 1 made little impression on me.

So Danny Rand, an American, is the Iron Fist. Right away I’m thinking, why can’t there be an Asian superhero? Even if it’s the stereotypical martial artist hero-type, why are there so many damn American superheroes in the Marvel Universe?! The plot, as near as I can make out, is that Rand’s company (because every superhero’s alter-ego is a billionaire industrialist!) is being taken over by a Chinese company secretly run by HYDRA, a group who made the Nazis look liberal.

There are several flashbacks to the past where we see other Iron Fists - Iron Fist is a title, ok got it - throughout the ages, fighting (presumably) bad guys, and for some reason Danny meets the Iron Fist from the First World War who somehow looks about 40.
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