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Immigrants: Your Country Needs Them Paperback – 4 Jan 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown (4 Jan. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316732486
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316732482
  • Product Dimensions: 15 x 2.8 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,327,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

The case for immigration ... is grounded in hard economic fact, as Philippe Legrain shows in IMMIGRANTS - a passionate and cogent plea for liberalising migration (FINANCIAL TIMES)

Energetic and right-minded ... In all important respects Legrain is right on target; one turns his pages to the almost audible sound of nails being smacked on the head. In the context of the fearful chatter that surrounds the subject, sense as good as thi (GUARDIAN)

A passionate, enormously detailed plea . . . He provides plenty of material to dispose of ill-informed predjudice (MAIL ON SUNDAY)

Full of striking information and thought-provoking statistics . . . A vigorous and stimulating contribution to one of the most important debates of our time (SUNDAY BUSINESS POST)

Book Description

Philippe Legrain makes a compelling case for global immigration with a book that is guaranteed to spark debate

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

64 of 78 people found the following review helpful By R. C. Brooks on 14 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback
Immigration is a complex topic. It takes different forms, and has varied effects depending on the type and level of immigration from source nations, as well the social and economic environment in the receiving country. Policies that might work successfully in a resource rich, low population country like Canada, could have negative consequences when applied to a high-density country like the United Kingdom. When I bought Immigrants after reading a recommendation from the economics editor of the Times, I was expecting an economically literate analysis of the pros and cons of immigration. Instead, the author, through a series of anecdotes and haphazard presentation of academic findings, provides a Panglossian vision reducing the complexities of the issue down to one finding: immigration = good.

First, as a good portion of the book seems more concerned about establishing the author's credentials as a socially enlightened liberal, rather than providing a thoughtful analysis of the social and economic impact of immigration, let me say up front that I'm not a reactionary conservative nor a national socialist (i.e. Nazi for those who are less historically inclined) as the author labels (really, he does) those who question the wisdom of unfettered immigration. I view myself as a liberal - not Daily Worker leftist, to be honest, but I am a gay, Guardian-reading, Islington resident, and an immigrant to the UK to boot. I should also add that I trained as an economist, and I'm a firm believer in the power of markets to set prices.
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22 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Achille Talon - Erudit on 3 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a pure economic argument with no acknowledgement of the social realities - or even of the economic reality that immigrant workers have only been needed in the UK because the same number of people are paid not to work. The social and political impact (education, crime and even terrorism) are completely ignored except for an implication that anyone who is against immigration is a racist and little-Englander. Facile and juvenile.
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21 of 34 people found the following review helpful By F. Collier on 3 Aug. 2009
Format: Paperback
Apparently anyone who cannot see that unrestricted immigration is an unmixed blessing is a fool and a bigot - and almost certainly not a Guardian-reader. The author is, presumably, having a bit of fun with his readers; but I expect few will see the joke.
I particularly enjoyed the suggestion that Israel's experience of welcoming all Jewish immigration can be used to argue the case that an open-door policy is a thoroughly good thing, always and everywhere. Tell that to the Palestinians.

Anyone wishing to read a book of real scholarship that deals with some of the issues that Legrain raises should try 'The Culture of Critique' by Kevin MacDonald.
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14 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Achille Talon - Erudit on 8 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
This theoretical economic argument for a theoretical society ignores the real world: the central economic issue is that our economy only needs immigrants because Brits are paid not to work.

Current unemployment at around 14% (straight unemployment plus about half of Incapacity Benefit claimants) is vastly higher than the total of all immigration in the last 50 years (some 5-7%).

I have seen the author in debate and he is a propagandist of evangelical fervour who refuses to address the welfare issue - for example, by talking about skilled workers, investors and brain surgeons, whose tiny numbers are irrelevant to the overall question.

People casually talk about immigrants filling the jobs that Brits won't do, which confuses the issue: they are jobs that Brits don't need because they can get the same amount or more on the dole. The poverty trap for a single parent with one child is over £16,000 (the amount you have to be paid to make it worth losing your various benefits), so why take a lower income (and deprive your children of your care while paying someone else to look after them)?

That is just the economic issue. Legrain dismisses the social and cultural issues as racism.
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10 of 18 people found the following review helpful By tiger moto on 8 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
I have written to Legrain about globalization and unrestricted migration.i did not get a reply.Do not buy this book. economic arguments for migration devoid of the social impacts on society are not worth considering,and anyone who questions the need for ever increasing migration is automatically labelled a racist,which is a way of not dealing with the issue.What kind of society we want
Legrain is a trained economist with very little knowledge of how the real world works.As a trained economist legrain talks ,more like a politcian.
The notion that if every body migrates we will be all better off is nonsense.
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14 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Jason Inskip on 30 Nov. 2009
Format: Paperback
If you want to read poorly written pseudo-intellectual candy-floss, by a journalist who is trying to make a name for himself by being contentious about a very serious issue, then here it is.

Ho hum
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19 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Big Dug Simba on 21 Feb. 2008
Format: Paperback
As a sixth-form debater the author would score high for his single-minded determination to defend the motion but by the same token he ignores or dismisses anything that doesn't fit.

Some polemics give food for thought even if you disagree with them but this is a waste of time: the economic calculation that a growing economy needs more workers is blatantly obvious and quickly stated - and that's about it. All the other factors, like the Welfare State, are left outside the equation or dismissed with contempt.
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