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I'm New Here
 
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I'm New Here

8 Feb 2010 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 10.78 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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30
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2:20
30
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3:33
30
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3:33
30
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2:02
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0:18
30
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2:58
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0:12
30
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1:14
30
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0:14
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4:29
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0:08
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2:00
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2:44
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0:16
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2:15

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 8 Feb 2010
  • Label: XL
  • Copyright: 2010 XL Recordings Ltd.
  • Total Length: 28:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0032JYEPI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,126 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

79 of 82 people found the following review helpful By Graham Chapman on 4 Jan 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When Spirits came out it seemed a real comeback - a more stripped down, back to basics (jazz) sound. It was good to hear a GSH album like the earlier ones without the drawn out, overfunked sound of some of the 80's albums. For some reason though he never seemed to play most of the songs of this album in concert.

I never thought it'd be 15 years til his next album and the last few years I never thought there would be a new album at all.

'I'm New Here' is a brutal, stark, blast of an album. Like hearing a dead man's last record. I was reminded of American Prayer - there is a ghostly poetry to GSH's vocals here. An aural 'Blood Simple'. Some may not be so keen on this somewhat filmic, voice over, indie style of record, but I think it's an excellent route for GSH in his later years. The aging icon as a source of pre-death wisdom, like Johnny Cash on his American albums.

There are not many musical legends still recording. Gil Scott-heron is undoubtedly one of them and this is a brilliant record for a new decade.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bm Ballin on 15 May 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The two bookends on this album are 'on coming from a broken home', a poignant and reflective tribute to Gil's Grandmother, which set the tone for this most personal of his albums. There is no 'The Revolution ...', 'B-Movies' or 'H2O gate blues', but the LP is no less political for that ... in a society where young black men are more likely to go to prison than to university, and where conservative rhetoric about 'broken homes' [or 'broken Britain' for that matter] crudely pathologises a complex mixture of economics, social pressure, continuing racism, existential striving, resistance and gender politics. The second bookend of the two defiantly reframes that situation as a struggle for survival: a pursuit of happiness, even.

In the 80s, Gil Scott-Heron was a lodestar in a fairly fluffy musical world, articulating with great humour and precision the concerns that many of us had in trying to make our way through life in the Reagan and Thatcher era. His voice is more battered now, more cracked in every way, but the insight and humour is still there - only ploughing a more visceral furrow.

The other pivotal track on this album is the exceptional 'Me and the Devil', where Gill channels the crossroads spirit of Robert Johnson and describes his own pact with the devil. It is this tornado which whirls through the rest of the album, magnificently underpinned by a wholly appropriate blend of deep blues and techno dramatics: hair-raising stuff on the track itself. Whether gently introspective, defiant, chaotically cut-up, the CD is a meditation on that diabolic pact, and Gil's personal jihad to reclaim himself and find a sort of redemption.

The bookends balance out that human tornado, humanise, soften and contextualise and externalise it, take it beyond himself.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By The Wolf TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Feb 2010
Format: Audio CD
Once upon a time Gil Scott Heron was a dangerous man.
A visionary, brave and inspirationally dangerous man.

Having listened to 'I'm New Here' three times I put
on my 1971 vinyl copy of 'Pieces Of A Man' (it's more
than a bit scratchy and jumpy now!) to remind myself
of just how much of an iconoclast he was. Unafraid to
challenge the very foundations of enduring inequality
under Richard Nixon's tainted kingdom of deceit and lies,
his contribution to the development of black musical
culture and its relationship to political challenge and
progress was both fearless and uplifting in equal measure.

'The Revolution Will Not Be Televised' still packs one
hell of a punch. A heroically scathing cris de coeur.

The last decade seems not to have been a walk in the park
for Mr Scott-Heron but here he is once again with a fine
collection of new songs, interspersed with reflective
poetic interludes. Short and sweet and very moving in
its austerely focussed intensity.

The voice still commands attention. Deeper now and more
than a little rough around the edges but still a unique
instrument with an incalculable ability to communicate
raw emotion and uncomfortable truths.

The contrast between the terrifyingly dark imagery of
'Me and The Devil' and the sweet and tender blues of
'I'll Take Care Of You' could not be greater.
This is a reflection of one of his greatest strengths
as a songwriter and performer : the ability to juggle
hope and despair and to survive the differences.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jason Brooker on 12 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
Those who have given this album a bad review just don't get it. Of course it's not like his other albums. Of course it is very different. GSH is an artist in the true sense of the word, and he has moved on from his previous incarnations. The man has spent alot of his adult life on drugs and some of it in jail, and he is reflecting on the consequences of this as well as the debt he owes to the women (the strong women) in his life. He is in his sixties now and has a different perspective from the young fire brand who wrote Whitey On The Moon. But make no mistake, this is an important work. It is both challenging, moving and profound. My only criticism, if you can call it a criticism, is that it is very short. But sometimes you can say all you need to say in 28 minutes.
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