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I'll Take Care of You
 
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I'll Take Care of You

21 Sept. 1999 | Format: MP3

£6.59 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
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3:00
30
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2:50
30
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3:22
30
4
3:20
30
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3:21
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3:49
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2:45
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3:23
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2:34
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3:12
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11
2:04

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 21 Sept. 1999
  • Label: Sub Pop
  • Copyright: 1999 Sub Pop Records
  • Total Length: 33:40
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003WAMSZK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 39,524 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Melissa House on 4 July 2004
Format: Audio CD
Ill Take Care, Lanegans 4th studio album, is a collection of cover tracks ranging from 50s/60s Southern soul classics-Ill Take Care of You (Brook Benton), Consider Me (Eddie Floyd/ Booker T. Jones), & the lesser known On Jesus' Programme by O. V. Wright, through to 60s/ 70s folk country tracks Shiloh town (Tim Hardin), Creeping Coastline Of Lights (James Arthur Moreland/ Manfred Hofer), Badi Da (Fred Neil) who incidently penned the classic 'Everybodys Talkin' for Nilsson, made famous in classic 60s film Midnight Cowboy, Together Again (Buck Owens) 50s American white country singer, Shanty Mans Life (Stephen Harrison Paulus), Boogie Boogie (Tim Rose) & a more obscure traditional American folk song Little Sadie, for which the official credit is simply 'Traditional'.
What makes this offering such a stand out success is not only the unique & almost peculiar selection / genres pulled together, but the fact that each song is deliverd with the utmost sincerity, style, & above all authenticity, so much so that they seem to be custom made for the man himself. Lanegans 'vintage' throat carries with it the weight of experience that allows him to interpret the blues/ soul, on tracks whose original versions were executed by 'heavyweights' their respective genres. He not only manages to make them his own, but chooses songs that ooze a sense of mystery darkness & grace that define his musical core, such as the minimal Creeping Coastline with its dreamy lyrics " leaving Hollywood, sunset to the sea.. where the waves ride in on horses.. im lookin for her lights.. creeping coastline of lights.." underscored sparsely by an eerie xylaphone or glockenshpiel.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Nov. 2000
Format: Audio CD
this is a fine collection of songs tailored to suite the moody voice of the screaming trees. the album is, on the whole a low key affair with the inclusion of acoustic guitars and haunting lyrics opitimised none more so with gloomy but beautifull tale of little sadie.the screaming trees own van conner plays bass on the album , but dont expect the screamimg trees , expect the gaunt gravelly voiced singer permorming cover versions in a style all of his own.shiloh town, carry home,little sadie and shanty mans boogie are primerally acoustic numbers with the remaining tracks on the album comprising both electric and acoustic guitars.if you a are curious to hear mark lanagen solo material or fancy somthining new but not sure what to take a chance on , take a chance on this one, it could be the best desicion you'll make all day.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jason Parkes #1 HALL OF FAME on 20 Jun. 2004
Format: Audio CD
Intended as a bunch of b-sides (as Lanegan records covers for b-sides most of the time), this developed into a full-length LP as 1990's The Winding Sheet developed from a proposed blues-ep. At just over 33 minutes it's not that long (e.p. Here Comes the Weird Chill is about the same length), but all 11 covers are perfect- Lanegan tackling songs by The Leaving Trains (Creeping Coastline of Lights), Fred Neil (Badi-Da), Otis Redding (Consider Me), Tim Hardin (Shiloh Town), O.V. Wright (On Jesus Program), Brook Benton (the title track), Tim Rose (Boogie Boogie), Buck Owens (Together Again) & traditional song Shanty Man's Life with the same gutso that he recorded Leadbelly's Where Did You Sleep Last Night?/In the Pines in 1989.
Prior LP Scraps at Midnight had been a bit all over the place- Care of You put Lanegan back on track for his final LP with Mike Johnson, 2001's Field Songs. This is compulsory listening for those who like the stripped-minimal alt-country/folk thing: Laura Veirs, Nina Nastasia, Hope Sandoval, the girl who was in The Be Good Tanyas, Gillian Welch etc. Failing that, it's as great as any of those Rubin-produced albums of covers released by Johnny Cash...
A random cast of musicians play alongside Lanegan and regular collaborator Mike Johnson (ex-Dinosaur Jr): Van Conner (Screaming Trees), Mark Pickeral (Ex-Screaming Trees, The Winding Sheet), Steve Berlin (All Shook Down by The Replacements), Barret Martin (Skinyard, Screaming Trees, QOTSA), Ben Shepherd (ex-Soundgarden), Martin Feveryear, Mark Boquist, David Krueger, Mark Hoyt etc.
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