• RRP: £9.99
  • You Save: £0.01
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Identity and Violence: Th... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by ShineWood
Condition: Used: Like New
Trade in your item
Get a £1.59
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny Paperback – 27 Sep 2007


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.98
£3.32 £3.32
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
£9.98 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny + The Idea of Justice + Development as Freedom
Price For All Three: £28.51

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £1.59
Trade in Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £1.59, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (27 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141027800
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141027807
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.4 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 139,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Identity and Violence is a moving, powerful essay about the mischief of bad ideas' Economist

About the Author

Amartya Sen is Lamont University Professor at Harvard. He won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998 and was Master of Trinity College, Cambridge 1998-2004. His last book, The Argumentative Indian, was also published by Penguin. His books have been translated into thirty languages.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Carno Polo on 5 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
This book makes one supremely important argument very well: to identify ourselves with an identity, no matter which, is both incorrect and dangerous. Most of us don't have ONE identity, but many. If one of them takes excessive precedence over the others, and we therefore identify ourselves mainly with it, we start down a slippery slope of exclusion of those who do not belong to it, even though we may share several of our other identities with them. The step from this process of exclusion to conflict and war is a short one to take.

I am a man who is or has been during his life an Italian citizen, a secular agnostic, a European, has lived many years in the United States, philosphically sceptical and politically cynical, a political scientist, an economics amateur, an international civil servant, a military analyst, a diver, a photographer, a consultant, heterosexual, a defender of civil liberties, an opponent of capital punishment, a believer in universal values, an existentialist, someone who is strongly attracted to Buddhism, a lover of classical music and cool jazz, someone who can't stand heavy metal and sports programs on TV (except the soccer world cup!), pro choice, in favor of birth control, someone who never watches TV, a hater of cigarettes who likes his pipes and a cigar once in a while, gastronomically and enologically curious, and many other things it would be too long to list.

Therefore, I can identify with many categories of mankind indeed. These categories are all like overlapping circles. Together, all of them make my identity, so I find it easy to be tolerant because I can share one or more of the above with most people alive on this planet.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Webber on 14 Sept. 2009
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book. It presents a deeply important critique of contemporary global politics clearly, succinctly, and with good humour. Everyone should read it.

Drawing on his impressively broad and detailed knowledge of the cultural history of various parts of the world, as well as the economic and political theory that has made his name (and earned him a Nobel Prize), Sen argues carefully against the current trend for wholly classifying individuals, communities, and regions of the world by one aspect of their culture, usually religion.

Over-emphasising a single identity, he argues, constrains the public reasoning and informed individual decision-making that is at the heart of human well-being. It also creates artificial and seemingly irreconcilable oppositions that degenerate into violence.

It's a shame Sen doesn't attempt to understand just why it is usually religious affiliation, rather than any other, that has this tendency to crowd out other aspects of identity in the worldviews of social theorists, political pundits, policy-makers, and self-styled cultural leaders, or why this identity has proved so potent a crowd-stirrer. I suspect the answer is an inherent tendency of at least some of the major religions to claim such dominance, and would like to know what difference it would make to Sen's view if this is the case.

Relatedly, it would be interesting to hear a lot more about an issue the book only touches upon: what are the pressures that lead us to foreground certain aspects of identity (religion, gender, sexuality) rather than any of the many other categorisations available to us?

But a good book is the start of a discussion, not the end of it. And the world would do well think long and hard about this one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By BlueSkiesForever on 12 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
I have to admit i expected more of this book. It felt as if Sen had just two points to make which is that (1) people have multiple identities and (2) we should not define people solely in terms of one of those identities, namely religious affiliation.

While both points are true i felt he never really got to the heart of why people prioritise particular identities in certain contexts (place, time, circumstances).

Nor did he seem to understand that an identity constructed in terms of multiple identities is an identity in itself. This is significant because it is this "meta-identity" that Sen himself prioritises. The book seemed to me to be about a perceived threat to Sen's identity rather than about identity, the concept.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By rehposolihP ehT on 5 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
Sen brings a refreshingly lucid voice to the ongoing debates centred around the inter-faith and multi-cultural conflicts that threaten all our futures; and in particular their role in fuelling global terrorism through feeding the roots to ever more divisive fundamentalism. Sen takes an altogether more rational and reasoned approach to comprehending the nature of this multi-faceted conundrum, by highlighting the plurality of our identities as the source of hope for increased understanding and empathy between hostile groups. Key to his thesis is the misguided framing of the various conflicts that seems to drive the discourse to date - pointing out where the fault lines lie - in terms of the attempt by hegemonic powers to engender simplistic thinking (be it racial, religious, ethnic or cultural polarization) that focuses on imposing singular overarching identities on our fellow man, (to brainwash the uneducated into seeing a mass of one dimensional stereotypes, that threaten their way of life!) enabling the fundamentalists in the process to de-humanise their imagined enemies in order to incite violence to protect, preserve and uphold what are ultimately spurious conceptual realities, and in so doing diminish all hope of identifying with "supposed enemies" as fellow human beings. His suggestions as to how we can get on a more constructive path to resolving many of the fundamental issues at the heart of all identity based violence, come down to a number of critical distinctions in the way we think about freedom.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback