Ian Gillan

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At a Glance

Birthname: Ian Gillan
Nationality: British
Born: Aug 19 1945


Biography

Ian Gillan is one of the foremost vocalists of the classic hard rock style of music that first emerged in the 1970s. Though he also piloted bands named after himself, and even fronted Black Sabbath for a while, he earned his greatest renown as a member of Deep Purple, a band he still fronts today.

Together with bass player Roger Glover, Gillan was invited to join Deep Purple in 1969, just prior to the group entering its most popular period. He was featured on a slew of successful Deep Purple recordings, such as: “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” (1970), “Deep Purple in Rock” (1970), ... Read more

Ian Gillan is one of the foremost vocalists of the classic hard rock style of music that first emerged in the 1970s. Though he also piloted bands named after himself, and even fronted Black Sabbath for a while, he earned his greatest renown as a member of Deep Purple, a band he still fronts today.

Together with bass player Roger Glover, Gillan was invited to join Deep Purple in 1969, just prior to the group entering its most popular period. He was featured on a slew of successful Deep Purple recordings, such as: “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” (1970), “Deep Purple in Rock” (1970), “Fireball” (1971, “Machine Head” (1972), “Made in Japan” (1973) and “Who Do We Think We Are”, before embarking on a solo career.

By 1971 the heavy recording schedule, along with incessant worldwide touring, had taken its toll on Gillan, who was hospitalized for exhaustion in October of that year, and subsequently voiced his intention to leave the band. At first he was persuaded to stay in the fold, but ultimately he did give Deep Purple final notice on June 29, 1973, at the end of another triumphant tour of Japan.

After a few false starts Gillan formed the Ian Gillan Band with guitarist Ray Fenwick, bassist John Gustafson, keyboardist Mike Moran, and drummer Mark Nauseef in 1975. Their debut album, “Child in Time”, released on Oyster Records, entered the British charts in July 1976 and the U.S. hit parade a month later.

Though the Deep Purple influence was never wiped clean, Gillan did make an effort to introduce a broader dimension to his music, and he was at his most adventurous on the follow-up album: “Clear Air Turbulence”. Displaying great musicianship, a superb production and clever arrangements of a more eclectic style of music, the album even features no less than five horn players. Some of the material features jazz fusion-influences, and overall the album turned out much more experimental than Gillan’s previous work with Deep Purple.

In essence “Before The Turbulence” contains the original mixes of the “Clear Air Turbulence” record. The album was recorded at Gillan’s own Kingsway Recorders studio between July and September 1976, and the tapes were then transferred to Rockfield Studios in Wales for mixing. Gillan however became displeased with the final mixes and delayed the release of the album, taking it back to Kingsway for a remix job before finally releasing it in April 1977, on Island Records. “Before The Turbulence” also features two bonus tracks recorded live in Hiroshima during the Ian Gillan Band’s September 1977 tour of Japan, as well as an interview with guitarist Ray Fenwick.

Line-up changes occurred, more albums were released throughout the years, the name was shortened to simply “Gillan” until at the end of 1982, Ian broke up his band, announcing that he had to rest his vocal cords on doctor's orders. In May 1983, he surprised just about everyone by joining Black Sabbath for the recording of their album “Born Again” and toured with the band from August to March 1984, until, on March 10, 1984, the 1969–1973 line-up of Deep Purple reunited to cut “Perfect Strangers” another million-selling album.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Ian Gillan is one of the foremost vocalists of the classic hard rock style of music that first emerged in the 1970s. Though he also piloted bands named after himself, and even fronted Black Sabbath for a while, he earned his greatest renown as a member of Deep Purple, a band he still fronts today.

Together with bass player Roger Glover, Gillan was invited to join Deep Purple in 1969, just prior to the group entering its most popular period. He was featured on a slew of successful Deep Purple recordings, such as: “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” (1970), “Deep Purple in Rock” (1970), “Fireball” (1971, “Machine Head” (1972), “Made in Japan” (1973) and “Who Do We Think We Are”, before embarking on a solo career.

By 1971 the heavy recording schedule, along with incessant worldwide touring, had taken its toll on Gillan, who was hospitalized for exhaustion in October of that year, and subsequently voiced his intention to leave the band. At first he was persuaded to stay in the fold, but ultimately he did give Deep Purple final notice on June 29, 1973, at the end of another triumphant tour of Japan.

After a few false starts Gillan formed the Ian Gillan Band with guitarist Ray Fenwick, bassist John Gustafson, keyboardist Mike Moran, and drummer Mark Nauseef in 1975. Their debut album, “Child in Time”, released on Oyster Records, entered the British charts in July 1976 and the U.S. hit parade a month later.

Though the Deep Purple influence was never wiped clean, Gillan did make an effort to introduce a broader dimension to his music, and he was at his most adventurous on the follow-up album: “Clear Air Turbulence”. Displaying great musicianship, a superb production and clever arrangements of a more eclectic style of music, the album even features no less than five horn players. Some of the material features jazz fusion-influences, and overall the album turned out much more experimental than Gillan’s previous work with Deep Purple.

In essence “Before The Turbulence” contains the original mixes of the “Clear Air Turbulence” record. The album was recorded at Gillan’s own Kingsway Recorders studio between July and September 1976, and the tapes were then transferred to Rockfield Studios in Wales for mixing. Gillan however became displeased with the final mixes and delayed the release of the album, taking it back to Kingsway for a remix job before finally releasing it in April 1977, on Island Records. “Before The Turbulence” also features two bonus tracks recorded live in Hiroshima during the Ian Gillan Band’s September 1977 tour of Japan, as well as an interview with guitarist Ray Fenwick.

Line-up changes occurred, more albums were released throughout the years, the name was shortened to simply “Gillan” until at the end of 1982, Ian broke up his band, announcing that he had to rest his vocal cords on doctor's orders. In May 1983, he surprised just about everyone by joining Black Sabbath for the recording of their album “Born Again” and toured with the band from August to March 1984, until, on March 10, 1984, the 1969–1973 line-up of Deep Purple reunited to cut “Perfect Strangers” another million-selling album.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Ian Gillan is one of the foremost vocalists of the classic hard rock style of music that first emerged in the 1970s. Though he also piloted bands named after himself, and even fronted Black Sabbath for a while, he earned his greatest renown as a member of Deep Purple, a band he still fronts today.

Together with bass player Roger Glover, Gillan was invited to join Deep Purple in 1969, just prior to the group entering its most popular period. He was featured on a slew of successful Deep Purple recordings, such as: “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” (1970), “Deep Purple in Rock” (1970), “Fireball” (1971, “Machine Head” (1972), “Made in Japan” (1973) and “Who Do We Think We Are”, before embarking on a solo career.

By 1971 the heavy recording schedule, along with incessant worldwide touring, had taken its toll on Gillan, who was hospitalized for exhaustion in October of that year, and subsequently voiced his intention to leave the band. At first he was persuaded to stay in the fold, but ultimately he did give Deep Purple final notice on June 29, 1973, at the end of another triumphant tour of Japan.

After a few false starts Gillan formed the Ian Gillan Band with guitarist Ray Fenwick, bassist John Gustafson, keyboardist Mike Moran, and drummer Mark Nauseef in 1975. Their debut album, “Child in Time”, released on Oyster Records, entered the British charts in July 1976 and the U.S. hit parade a month later.

Though the Deep Purple influence was never wiped clean, Gillan did make an effort to introduce a broader dimension to his music, and he was at his most adventurous on the follow-up album: “Clear Air Turbulence”. Displaying great musicianship, a superb production and clever arrangements of a more eclectic style of music, the album even features no less than five horn players. Some of the material features jazz fusion-influences, and overall the album turned out much more experimental than Gillan’s previous work with Deep Purple.

In essence “Before The Turbulence” contains the original mixes of the “Clear Air Turbulence” record. The album was recorded at Gillan’s own Kingsway Recorders studio between July and September 1976, and the tapes were then transferred to Rockfield Studios in Wales for mixing. Gillan however became displeased with the final mixes and delayed the release of the album, taking it back to Kingsway for a remix job before finally releasing it in April 1977, on Island Records. “Before The Turbulence” also features two bonus tracks recorded live in Hiroshima during the Ian Gillan Band’s September 1977 tour of Japan, as well as an interview with guitarist Ray Fenwick.

Line-up changes occurred, more albums were released throughout the years, the name was shortened to simply “Gillan” until at the end of 1982, Ian broke up his band, announcing that he had to rest his vocal cords on doctor's orders. In May 1983, he surprised just about everyone by joining Black Sabbath for the recording of their album “Born Again” and toured with the band from August to March 1984, until, on March 10, 1984, the 1969–1973 line-up of Deep Purple reunited to cut “Perfect Strangers” another million-selling album.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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