Ian Botham: The Power and the Glory and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Ian Botham: The Power and... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Ian Botham: The Power and the Glory Paperback – 15 Mar 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£0.01 £0.01
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Ian Botham: The Power and the Glory + Head On - Ian Botham: The Autobiography
Price For Both: £17.98

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd; Reprint edition (15 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847397980
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847397980
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 13.3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 334,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'A staggering story, extremely well told by author Simon Wilde' --Independent

'Simon Wilde, in this perfectly paced and exhaustively researched biography, recalls the magic of that astonishing summer' --Guardian

'Wilde's exhaustively researched book is a thoroughly enjoyable, well-paced read. Truth really is stranger than fiction' --Daily Telegraph

'Simon Wilde's sensitive and sympathetic biography is a book that takes Botham as a whole, and allows us to marvel at him a little once again... even-handed, beautifully written' --The Cricketer

'Revealing and candid' --Book of the Month, All Out Cricket

About the Author

Simon Wilde is a journalist and author. He has written for The Times and Sunday Times since 1998, and is currently the latter's cricket correspondent. Three of his books have been shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year award: Ranji: A Genius Rich and Strange, Letting Rip: The Fast Bowling Threat from Lillee to Waqar and Shane Warne: Portrait of a Flawed Genius. He also wrote Ian Botham: The Power and the Glory, published by Simon & Schuster. He lives in Hampshire.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. S. Stanier on 18 Sept. 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the single best book there is about Ian Botham.
Simon Wilde has done serious research, especially in terms of his range of interviewees, and this is a complete picture of a champion, who gradually fell into ineffectiveness as a Test cricketer, but remains a national treasure.
To give an example of the quality of research on show, there are four pages on how Botham famously claims to have run out Geoff Boycott in a Test against New Zealand as the team were fed up with his slow scoring. Wilde has interviewed Boycott himself about it, as well England team mates Bob Taylor, John Lever, Clive Radley and Bob Willis about it, and even Ewen Chatfield from New Zealand. Basically, Wilde concludes it wasn't deliberate, but the run-out became deliberate over the course of the telling of the anecdoate in later years: all part of the iconoclastic, anti-establishment character Botham wanted to portray.
There is similar diligent delving into other famous controversies: the 'punch-up' with Ian Chappell (which never was), the libel case with Imran Khan (Botham was very unlucky, feel the lawyers), and the non-signing up to the tours with South Africa (financially, not morally, driven).
He is also scrupulously fair in his judgements: contrary to usual report Botham did succeed once against the West Indies (at least to some degree), in the 1984 home series, when unburdened by the captaincy; he also points up Botham's performance against the full strength Aussies in 1979-80 to point out that Botham's early success wasn't just down to the lack of Packer players.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Bob Sherunkle VINE VOICE on 17 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
This book is a refreshing compromise between the opposing views of Botham as Marvel (though not Captain Marvel) and a boorish idiot. Rather like "the little book of George W Bushisms", a lot of what has been written about Botham is tosh, but a lot of it is not. For example, Simon Wilde skilfully analyses several of the best-known quotes attributed to Botham, showing which appear to be voluntary soundbites and which (like "facing Lillee with a stick of rhubarb") were staged by the media.

Another strong feature is the description of Botham's main mentors. The best-known of these relationships, of course, was with Brearley, but Wilde moves away from the simplistic man-management interpretation, demonstrating how Brearley used reverse psychology to fire up Botham; Wilde also tells us how Botham's famous 5-1 spell at Edgbaston in 1981 was possible only because Brearley had forced a very reluctant Botham to change into his bowling boots! By contrast, Wilde develops a case that Close, while a fan of Botham the player, never rated him as a captain. The third, a little surprisingly, is Cartwright, a very different type of person and bowler from Botham, who nevertheless was probably the biggest single influence on disciplining Botham's bowling technique.

Wilde gives several illustrations of how Botham's naivety often let him down. One is the fiasco of the Tim Hudson saga (but, I wonder, would Botham have gone for, and achieved, his record number of sixes in a season without the motivation of that circus?) Another is his inability to forget friendships and club loyalties at Test level, e.g. when playing against Viv Richards.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By ShabadooGMan on 29 April 2011
Format: Hardcover
Tirelessly researched, brilliantly written, this is not just a fantastic sports book, but a brilliant biography.

It's not shameless sycophancy, either, but an honest account of one of England's most famous sportsmen.

It's warts and all stuff and, for all his faults, I came away liking Beefy that much more.

I really can't recommend it enough.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By lbeeswax on 22 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I give this item 5 stars because the book is not sycophantic, I feel it tells Beefy's story truthfully, warts and all. I'm fortunate to remember Sir Ian's glory days....
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback