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Hush Money Paperback – 2 May 2006


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: No Exit Press; Exclusive to Waterstones edition (2 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842431978
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842431979
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 380,902 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert B. Parker (1932-2010) has long been acknowledged as the dean of American crime fiction. His novel featuring the wise-cracking, street-smart Boston private-eye Spenser earned him a devoted following and reams of critical acclaim, typified by R.W.B. Lewis' comment, "We are witnessing one of the great series in the history of the American detective story" (The New York Times Book Review). In June and October of 2005, Parker had national bestsellers with APPALOOSA and SCHOOL DAYS, and continued his winning streak in February of 2006 with his latest Jesse Stone novel, SEA CHANGE.

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Parker attended Colby College in Maine, served with the Army in Korea, and then completed a Ph.D. in English at Boston University. He married his wife Joan in 1956; they raised two sons, David and Daniel. Together the Parkers founded Pearl Productions, a Boston-based independent film company named after their short-haired pointer, Pearl, who has also been featured in many of Parker's novels.

Parker began writing his Spenser novels in 1971 while teaching at Boston's Northeastern University. Little did he suspect then that his witty, literate prose and psychological insights would make him keeper-of-the-flame of America's rich tradition of detective fiction. Parker's fictional Spenser inspired the ABC-TV series Spenser: For Hire. In February 2005, CBS-TV broadcast its highly-rated adaptation of the Jesse Stone novel Stone Cold, which featured Tom Selleck in the lead role as Parker's small-town police chief. The second CBS movie, Night Passage, also scored high ratings, and the third, Death in Paradise, aired on April 30, 2006.

Parker was named Grand Master of the 2002 Edgar Awards by the Mystery Writers of America, an honor shared with earlier masters such as Alfred Hitchcock and Ellery Queen.

Parker died on January 19, 2010, at the age of 77.

Product Description

Book Description

A morally complex tale that pits the burly Boston private investigator, Spenser, and his redoubtable cohort, Hawk, against local intellectual heavyweights. When Robinson Nevins, the son of Hawk's boyhood mentor, is denied tenure at the university, Hawk asks Spenser to investigate. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Robert B. Parker is the bestselling author of more than forty-one books. He lives in Boston. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Outside my window a mixture of rain and snow was settling into slush on Berkeley Street. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 May 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Robert Parker has introduced a new element in this fine novel. He has Spenser carrying on two investigations at the same time. One is for a friend of Susan's, the other for a friend of Hawk's. Both are nonpaying jobs, and both are demanding. So you get the equivalent of two novels in one.
Better than that, the two story lines involve different ends of the Spenser spectrum. We get lots of female, sexual and romantic issues in the case involving Susan's friend, and lots of political, sexual and racial issues in the other case. Seeing them all together provides a fuller picture of Spenser's personal ethic, Robert Parker's favorite theme. Parker does a good job of designing the challenges to Spenser a way that he comes up against his moral limits quite often, which helps to flesh out his character is a very satisfying way.
Beyond that benefit, the book is also improved by providing new insights into Susan and Hawk that have not been revealed before.
As a result, the story line keeps moving much better than in most Spenser novels. That asset is further improved by a plot that has more reversals in it than in any other Spenser novel I can remember. The irony is chin deep before long.
The only thing I didn't like about the book was Parker's insistence on having Susan and Spenser feed Pearl, the wonder dog, all kinds of unhealthy food like doughnuts at every possible occasion in the story. What's the point?
If you have ever enjoyed another Spenser novel, read this book immediately! It will probably turn out to be one of your favorites among the books in the series. Have a great read!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sam Tyler on 24 Mar 2009
Format: Paperback
The Private Eye genre is perhaps one of the most oversubscribed around and Robert B Parker one of its most prolific authors. With countless novels to his name it's amazing to see that the quality is usually of a decent standard and in some cases great. `Hush Money' is another in the Spenser series and follows battered PI Spenser around as he investigates a stalking case and a University Professor not getting tenure. Neither concept should be overly interesting, but Parker makes them exciting and funny cases.

It's the humour in `Hush Money' that makes it a joy to read. Spenser and his friend Hawk in particular have a cynical and amusing look out on life and this comes across on the page. The story itself is also good with a decent pace and interesting conclusion. The only real misgiving I have with this book is the slightly chauvinistic feel that it has. This is all done in a tongue and cheek manner, but with storylines surrounding sexuality and race it skates a slightly uncomfortable line. Overall, I really enjoyed this light and breezy book as it was a genuinely amusing crime fiction novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 9 April 1999
Format: Hardcover
This time Spenser takes on two cases for the price of one, which is zero. He even mentions in passing another case he had that he didn't get paid for. When was the last time he made any money? I don't think he is independently wealthy, so I guess he just makes money off the boring cases that we don't read about. Or maybe Susan is supporting him? That aside, this was a good story with lots of twists and surprises. I would like to have seen a bit more of a confrontation with the guys who threaten to kill Spenser and Hawk. They do get theirs in the end, but that is largely offstage. The strength of this book, as always, is the interplay among the characters. The resolution of the stalking subplot was really good, we get to see an unexpected side of Susan. I enjoyed this book, but I still wonder if Parker would keep writing them if his financial arrangements were the same as Spenser's.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lmhh VINE VOICE on 30 July 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the first Spenser novel I have read, and it is entirely carried by the wise cracking dialogue, and the interesting relationships between Spenser (the detective), Susan (his girlfriend) and Hawk (Spenser's friend) as the key characters. Assuming these themes recur in the other Spenser novels, I will certainly give more Robert B Parker creations a read. The spare style is reminiscent of the best 40s detective novels. And it would be nice to think that you could behave in the way Spenser and Hawk do, with complete disregard for the "normal" rules of conduct, and still put the bad guys away and ride off into the sunset!

Not a book that will change your life, but one that will provide several hours of enjoyment and entertainment.
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Format: Paperback
"Hush Money" begins with Hawk brining Spenser a client; Robinson Nevins, the son of Hawk's boyhood mentor, has been denied tenure at the University because of rumors that he was the lover of Prentice Lamont, a student and gay activist who committed suicide. Of course, as we have long come to expect with Robert B. Parker's novels in this series, no one will talk to our hero who eventually finds out the case is more and more complicated. There is also a secondary case involving a "friend" of Susan's, K. C. Roth, the victim of a stalker who finds our hero the proverbial white knight come to rescue her from any and all evils. This case gives Spenser something to do while the main case moves slowly along. The resolution of the main plot line is perhaps the most over the top resolution since the James Bondian climax of "A Catskill Eagle." I have spent the winter reading all of the Spenser novels in order and this has to be the most convoluted and complex case in the bunch and one of the few times Parker has really stretched credulity with me. Perhaps because I am defrocked college professor I have enjoyed Spenser's encounters over the years with various professors and administrators in their academic bastions (after all, this is where we started in "The Godwulf Manuscript"), but I have also appreciated the fact that such characters are drawn by Parker in lighter and darker shades of gray. "Hush Money" provides his best encounters which such intellectual denizens.
"Hush Money" is a slightly better than average Spenser story. The high points of this novel are when Hawk finally reveals some details about his life before meeting Spenser and when Susan decks someone (she also warns them they will "be sleeping with the fishes").
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