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Hurley [12" VINYL] Single


Price: £19.22 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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£19.22 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 5 left in stock. Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
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This item is delivered in an easy-to-open recyclable box and is free of excess packaging materials. Learn more or visit the Amazon Frustration-Free Packaging Store.

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Frequently Bought Together

Hurley [12" VINYL] + Raditude + Make Believe
Price For All Three: £31.37

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Product Features

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Product details

  • Vinyl (17 Aug. 2009)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Single
  • Label: Epitaph
  • ASIN: B003ZBTEJO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 331,356 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Memories
2. Ruling Me
3. Trainwrecks
4. Unspoken
5. Where's My Sex?
6. Run Away
7. Hang On
8. Smart Girls
9. Brave New World
10. Time Flies
Disc: 2
1. Memories
2. Ruling Me
3. Trainwrecks
4. Unspoken
5. Where's My Sex?
6. Run Away
7. Hang On
8. Smart Girls
9. Brave New World
10. Time Flies

Product Description

BBC Review

Weezer are undoubtedly massive heroes. Some 16 years after their breakout single Buddy Holly pretty much invented geek rock, the loveably effete quartet can still crank out brilliant melodies when the mood suits.

Eight albums in, though, and what more can they say? Unfortunately, not a great deal. Guys are inevitably idiots most of the time and girls can be complicated. We get it. So the best songs on Hurley are immediately familiar, like an old lover’s phone number you can’t forget. This is great, but obviously not that great. Everybody should move on after a while.

Uncertain love song Ruling Me includes the fabulous line, "You shove me out but it turns me on," but ultimately it’s just not as good as its most obvious comparison, early rarity Jamie. Elsewhere, the crunching slacker anthem Trainwrecks will remind any sentient beings of Weezer's own Beverly Hills (one of the best singles of 2005) and, rather perversely, Feargal Sharkey’s A Good Heart.

Frontman Rivers Cuomo is as contradictorily charismatic and slight here as he is on every release, but this can be a hindrance. His vocals have the same old yearning and direct energy, but at times it’s hard to care. Time Flies might have been a brilliant Graham Coxon acoustic tear-up; instead it just drifts by lazily like a packed bus during rush hour. Deliberately scuzzy acoustic guitars and distortion are great, but where’s the tune? Cuomo and occasional Weezer collaborator Shawn Everett were behind the desk on this song but they would’ve fared better with Rick Rubin, who was a great influence on the band’s early work and a vital contributor to their red self-titled album of 2008, which yielded songs as weirdly excellent but still naggingly melodic as Pork and Beans.

Describing a Weezer album as disappointing is a bit like watching an Olympic medal winner smoke crack: a sad reminder that everyone is fallible, no matter how talented they are. Check out their Reading Festival performance on YouTube or an earlier album to get a proper idea of what the band can do.

--Lou Thomas

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul Mc on 27 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When critics discuss Weezer, they tend to refer to two classic albums and a host of disappointments. I am inclined to agree with this view, though my two classics are Pinkerton and the unspeakably magnificent Green Album (the Blue album isn't quite at that level for me, they were still learning their trade). Following the Green Album, though, the fayre we have been treated to has been the disappointing `Maladroit,' the downright awful `Make Believe' and the overly poppy `Raditude.' Only the Red Album (in patches) has done anything to arrest this trend.

However, with a new record label and some big-name assistance with the songwriting, with `Hurley' I am pleased to say Rivers and Co are showing signs of getting back on the right track.

In style, this is probably most similar to `Green,' ten short-but sweet pop-rock blasts with no unnecessary frills or experimentation. In particular, `memories,' `Ruling Me' and the quirky closer `Time Flies' stand out.

Possibly due to the jump to an Indie label (Epitaph) there is a freedom an unfettered feel to the songwriting (no contrived hit singles a la `Beverly Hills' or rap collaborations here) and Rivers certainly sounds like he's having fun. There is still the grating `teen angst' air to the lyrics, difficult to reconcile with a man who, last I heard, was happily married...but that is what you get from Weezer and maybe we shouldn't expect anything else.

It is arguable that Weezer will never reach the level of their first three albums (unless Rivers goes through a messy divorce, which we wouldn't wish on him). But for the moment, this will more than do the trick.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By M. Young on 20 Sept. 2010
Format: Audio CD
Although the British media has failed to pick up on it as prominently as its American counterpart (perhaps because weezer aren't as relevant in Europe as in the states), it's clear that over the past decade weezer have become something of a joke. The band themselves haven't helped tackle this, given their last (woeful) album was called "Raditude" and had a flying dog on the cover (in fact, the cover of this album doesn't help matters either). Gradually losing a lot of the goodwill - garnered in response to the indisputably classic Blue Album and Pinkerton - with 5 albums worth of tracks ranging from merely above average power pop to dreadful embarrassments (most recently Beverly Hills, Can't Stop Partying, I'm Your Daddy, Cold Dark World etc...) the band hit a low point when Pitchfork media - the Mecca of the US indie music press - gave 2005's Make Believe 0.4 stars out of ten while claiming it was not only "just plain awful" but also retroactively ruined any enjoyment of even the bands first 2 brilliant albums.

While these comments were unfair, Make Beleive confirmed what the Green Album and Maladroit - almost entirely consisting of 2 1/2 minute songs with cookie cutter lyrics and power pop hooks - had suggested: that weezer was creatively defunct. Nothing about that album, and very little of Green and Maladroit, stood out as the product of an experienced band who had once defined a genre and inspired countless copy-cat acts (indeed, they barely managed to outdo the output of these very same copy-cats).

While Hurley isn't a return to form (as the band had, perhaps unfairly, hinted while publicising the album) it is successful at wiping the slate clean for fans.
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Format: Audio CD
The last time Weezer were "essential" in my musical life was 2000's Green Album. Perhaps through no fault of their own, with that album finding itself as the peerless soundtrack to my summer that year, my interest in them, whilst never waning, could never quite reach those levels again. Whilst I dutifully trot out to the record store upon the arrival of the latest Weezer album the buzz never really hits the heights it once did. They've certainly had their moments since then but the fact that my MP3 player has their first three albums in full but only selected highlights from anything since says it all. If anything they'd make perfect fodder for a Christmas "Greatest Hits" collection but instead we get Hurley, a quick-ish follow up to the disappointing Raditude.
It pretty much follows the pattern of the last few albums; some good, some indifferent and the occasional out and out stinker. Those fans, like me, who have stuck with them this far will find more than enough to enjoy; the likes of Memories, Brave New World and Time Flies all showcase the band's knack for catchy pop melodies and they'll make quality additions to that homemade playlist you'll make of their best songs. Others, not least the fairly pointless cover version of Coldplay's Viva La Vida, will be largely forgotten in time to come and aren't the songs you will remember when you're next discussing how good Weezer are with your friends. If it's enough that a band that have been releasing albums for nearly two decades have delivered an album which adds a handful of new tracks to your on-going list of Weezer favourites then this is a fine effort. Those wishing they could somehow recapture the all-encompassing brilliance of the Blue Album, Pinkerton or the Green Album might ultimately be disappointed by this, even if you will lose that in the delight of those new tracks which do deliver the goods.
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