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Hundred Days: The Campaign That Ended World War I [Hardcover]

Nick Lloyd
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 350 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books (AZ) (28 Jan 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465074928
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465074921
  • Product Dimensions: 24.2 x 16.4 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 987,965 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Nick Lloyd, BA (Hons), PhD, is Senior Lecturer in Defence Studies at King's College London based at the Joint Services Command & Staff College in Shrivenham, Wiltshire. He specialises in British military and imperial history in the era of the Great War.

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By Jill Meyer TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
"Did anyone really care whether Alsace-Lorraine was French or German?" Using those words, British history professor Nick Lloyd summed up German thoughts at the end of the "Great War" as the German government considered surrendering to the Allied forces in Fall, 1918, in his new book, "Hundred Days".

August 1914 - young men from Britain to Austro-Hungary marched gaily off to war. They'd be home by Christmas, these fearless young men told themselves - and each other. But as the years went by with battles gaining literally inches and men living - and dying - in hideous trenches in France and Belgium, by summer of 1918, the war was finally creaking to an end. The American entry into the war in 1917 on the Allied side had given the French, British, and Dominion troops an added boost to those armies who had been fighting for three years, often to a standoff with the Germans on the Western Front, in a war of attrition.

Nick LLoyd, a senior lecturer of Defense Studies, at Kings College, London, lost a great-uncle at the French village of Gouzeaucourt, just six weeks or so before the Armistice. Lloyd has written an amazingly readable book about those last hundred days of WW1. He looks at the war from British, German, French, and American sides and examines both the military battles at the Front and the political battles behind the scenes. He includes maps at the front of the book which detail the battles fought and military lines that had to be crossed by the advancing Allies and defended by the Germans.

One of the most interesting parts of the book deals with the political situation in Germany as the war caused the collapse of the Kaiser's government. Lloyd looks at the cries of "betrayal by the Communists/Bolshevics/Jews/Defeatists" that lasted well into the 1920's and '30's. Nick LLoyd has done a wonderful job looking at a smallish slice of time in a much larger conflict. Great book for WW1 history readers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  40 reviews
38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Did anyone really care whether Alsace-Lorraine was..." 28 Jan 2014
By Jill Meyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
"Did anyone really care whether Alsace-Lorraine was French or German?" Using those words, British history professor Nick Lloyd summed up German thoughts at the end of the "Great War" as the German government considered surrendering to the Allied forces in Fall, 1918, in his new book, "Hundred Days".

August 1914 - young men from Britain to Austro-Hungary marched gaily off to war. They'd be home by Christmas, these fearless young men told themselves - and each other. But as the years went by with battles gaining literally inches and men living - and dying - in hideous trenches in France and Belgium, by summer of 1918, the war was finally creaking to an end. The American entry into the war in 1917 on the Allied side had given the French, British, and Dominion troops an added boost to those armies who had been fighting for three years, often to a standoff with the Germans on the Western Front, in a war of attrition.

Nick LLoyd, a senior lecturer of Defense Studies, at Kings College, London, lost a great-uncle at the French village of Gouzeaucourt, just six weeks or so before the Armistice. Lloyd has written an amazingly readable book about those last hundred days of WW1. He looks at the war from British, German, French, and American sides and examines both the military battles at the Front and the political battles behind the scenes. He includes maps at the front of the book which detail the battles fought and military lines that had to be crossed by the advancing Allies and defended by the Germans.

One of the most interesting parts of the book deals with the political situation in Germany as the war caused the collapse of the Kaiser's government. Lloyd looks at the cries of "betrayal by the Communists/Bolshevics/Jews/Defeatists" that lasted well into the 1920's and '30's. Nick LLoyd has done a wonderful job looking at a smallish slice of time in a much larger conflict. Great book for WW1 history readers.
38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A BOOK THAT FILLS A LARGE GAP! 28 Jan 2014
By the GreatReads! - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Hundred Days: The Campaign That Ended World War I by Nick Lloyd is a commendable work that sheds much light on a campaign that brings a devastating war to an end. And with it Nick Lloyd enters an exclusive club of Great War historians, which is an achievement as difficult as ending World War I. Lloyd’s account of the war’s final campaign which he described as “an incredible story of shot and shell, of battles on a scale almost unimaginable to modern generations” is insightful, and a timely reminder of the tide that turned the course of the war.

The “Hundred Days” covers the period from August 8 to November 11, 1918, during which a series of well-organized Allied attacks were launched that pushed the Germans out of France and resulted in the German government to ultimately seek peace. What comes as a surprise is the dearth of books on the end of WWI while the market has been literally flooded with hundreds of books about its origins. Nick Lloyd’s book filled the large vacuum in the history of the war.

Unlike other books on an important chapter in the annals of history which tend to be lengthy and voluminous, this book is tight with less than 400 pages, containing fifteen chapters, a prologue, preface, epilogue, selected bibliography, reference list, glossary, map section, illustrations and acknowledgements. Hundred Days: The Campaign That Ended World War is a job well-done and should be in the hands of all historians and researchers.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars an important book! 17 Mar 2014
By Jonathan Porath - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
As a long-time history buff and fan, in particular, of the First World War, this book filled a very important gap in the popular literature of the War. It picks up in July, 1918, with the failure of the German attacks on the Western Front, and shows, battle by battle, the progress of the Allied counter-attack. It is especially valuable in quoting German documents, diaries, etc. which demonstrate the increasing precarious situation they found them selves in. The maps, while adequate, could have been more detailed. Well worth the read!
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars if you read about 1914, you should read about 1918 31 Mar 2014
By Brad M. Martisius - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
The author's thesis is that the beginning of WWI has been covered far more extensively by historians than the finale. This book is intended to begin redressing that imbalance. I thought it struck a fair balance between narrative and operational history, thus making the book a most engaging read.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Able Account of the End of World War I on the Battlefield 3 April 2014
By Michael B. Crutcher - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Nick Lloyd has written a straightforward and compelling account of the final battles of World War I.

The author observes that their are many books on the origins and events of the beginning of the war, but few on the end. In particular, there is an inadequate understanding of the impact of American participation on the battlefield. Mr. Lloyd remedies that by providing a clear and readable history of the battles of the final days. He has vivid portraits of the leading allied generals: Foch, Pershing, Haig and Petain. He personalizes the story with battlefield accounts by the soldiers themselves, including an account of a relative who died in the war's closing days. Despite all the tragedy and horror we have witnessed in the intervening years, there is still nothing quite as desperate and heart-rending as the story of foot soldiers in the mud, gas and barbed wire of WWI.

Lloyd makes it clear how the German war machine had effectively lost its bearings and was grinding to a halt. Field Marshal Ludendorff had become irrational, despondent one minute and full of bravado the next. After the Kaiser sacked him, the army was probably better off, but it had lost cohesion. The Kaiser remained in a state of delusion himself, confident that the people and Army stood behind him. He was soon to learn better.

Congratulations to Mr. Lloyd for illuminating the end of the conflict in this well-written and helpful account.
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