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One Hundred Days Paperback – 29 Mar 2012

4.7 out of 5 stars 83 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 576 pages
  • Publisher: HarperPress; Revised edition edition (29 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007436408
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007436408
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 70,098 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

‘One of the most gripping, convincing and realistic accounts of a naval battle ever published.’ John Keegan, Daily Telegraph

‘Perceptive, vivid, engaging.’ Guardian

‘One of the clearest and frankest accounts ever written of modern naval warfare.’ Field Marshal Lord Carver, Sunday Telegraph

From the Back Cover

THE ACCLAIMED BEST-SELLER

With a Foreword by The Rt. Hon. Margaret Thatcher

"The best book about the Royal Navy at war since Monsarrat wrote 'The Cruel Sea' forty years ago"
GORDON MACKENZIE, 'Daily Mail'

"A first-class account of the Falklands War – thrilling as well as lucid in explaining the complicated technology that dictated its tactics; vivid in its description of what it all looked and felt like; magnanimous in its judgement of men. Best of all, it gives a wonderfully penetrating account of 'the interior workings of the mind of a battle commander'… As enlightening as it is enthralling"
RICHARD OLLARD

"One of the clearest and frankest accounts ever written of modern naval warfare"
FIELD MARSHAL LORD CARVER, 'Sunday Telegraph'

"Not since Lord Nelson has any senior naval commander described so frankly the loneliness of high command"
TOM POCOCK, 'The Times'

"One of the most gripping, convincing and realistic accounts of a naval battle ever published"
JOHN KEEGAN, 'Daily Telegraph'

"A compulsive narrative with a strongly human undertone"
GENERAL SIR JOHN HACKETT, 'Spectator'

"Perceptive, vivid and engaging"
GUARDIAN

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Inside This Book

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
One of the most interesting things about the book is the new foreward that Admiral Woodward has written to accompany this new edition. In it he acknowledges the communications problems that beset the British during the war, and the problems that led to with some of his opposite numbers such as Brigadier Thompson and Commander Mike Clapp (who commanded the amphibious group).
Woodward admits that during the fighting, he often wasn't aware that sometimes he had stepped on his counterparts' toes.
A better satellite communications system would certainly have helped cure some of these headaches, it seems.
What comes across is something of the loneliness of command. Wodward says he dealt with it by letting off steam in his diary -- of which there are chunks in the book.
In all a well-written account - for which the Admiral quite properly thanks Patrick Robinson, who wrote most of the book.
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Format: Paperback
This fine naval autobiography takes us behind the scenes of the Falklands sea/air (not ground) war and modern battle management in general. Admiral Woodward didn't exactly know what he was sailing into back in 1982, and makes no attempt to hide his personal sense of vulnerability as Britain's first fighting admiral in high-tech warfare. In fact, the entire book is refreshingly down-to-earth. Woodward is quick to note that he was tapped for the job because he happened to be the navy's closest flotilla commander at the time (in Gibraltar)--and confides that his superiors almost replaced him with a higher-ranking officer even as he led the task force into danger. This is no stuffed-shirt memoir.
Woodward and co-author Patrick Robinson weave accounts of grand strategy and military politics through a genuinely absorbing narrative of men and machines in heavy weather, incessant tactical maneuvering, and flashes of terrifying combat. Along the way, there are plenty of 'what-if's to chew on. We learn that Woodward had to manipulate London to get HMS Conqueror to sink the Argentine cruiser General Belgrano (British subs weren't under his tactical command). He explains why the sinking was both necessary and tragic, and how Conqueror watched but spared Argentine ships coming to Belgrano's aid. He also reveals that his ships almost shot down a Brazilian airliner mistaken for a pesky Argentine recon jet; he personally gave the order to withhold fire. And Woodward's character shines through his account of ordering HMS Alacrity on a potential suicide mission to scout mines--in an exceptionally gracious mea culpa of command, he praises the captain's sterling courage while faulting his own mundane direction.
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Format: Paperback
Of the many books written about the Falklands war, Admiral Woodward's is surely one of the best. His account is remarkable for many reasons, one of which is the way he is able to convey the big picture of the campaign and yet at the same time bring us his own very personal viewpoint, written in a gripping and thoroughly involving manner.

There's a disarming frankness about much of his account, contrasting with some of the other written accounts by servicemen which, while excellent in many respects, can have a certain air of self-justification about them. In contrast, Sandy's self-deprecating manner and tendency to British understatement read very well. For example, he tells us some of the names he was called, both during and after the campaign, including arrogant, incompetent and cowardly - the latter mainly for taking the very obvious precaution of stationing his two aircraft carriers well to the east of the Falklands, out of range of Argentinian aircraft and missiles. He deals with some of these criticisms, in a tolerant and civilised manner, in the preface to this updated 2012 edition; and elsewhere he describes himself simply as "a bloke who found himself in charge".

Of course in reality he was much more than that. His account of his naval training and career reminded me of the excellent book "Highest Duty" by Captain Chesley Sullenberger - the pilot who landed his plane and passengers safely on the Hudson River - in the sense that, with hindsight, it becomes clear that what has gone before was a highly effective preparation for the moment when all of this knowledge and skill are to be tested to the limit, and as a result the bloke in charge is able to deliver the goods.
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Format: Paperback
Not a hero's tale but a factbook offering an inside view of how the situation developed for the Task Force Commander. It is very readable, not only because of the honesty on human errors and technical shortcomings. This, together with healthy self-irony makes it a worthwile read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very well organised and clearly written 500 page account of the Falkands War. Written by the Admiral who managed the whole conflict I found it informative and very moving. His objective assessments of risk and damage to the shipping involved give an insight in to the reality of war.
Sandy Woodward was aged 50 at this time and was a very well qualified and experienced naval officer.
There are sub themes in this book which are conflicts between his concern about individual ships and their crews and the overall purpose of the Task Force. The regular failure of computer systems and missiles is reported and I felt a sense of despair. Here were very expensive systems which were no good. The effect of a few days heavy seas' salt encrustation on missiles working or not should be a warning to those that design these things. To command forces to be in a place where they would be defenceless (probably) required a great sense of duty and determination to get the job done. Other conflicts included the lack of being able to control the submarines available because London wouldn't let go of this, the vagaries of politics, and the lack of clarity over who was in command are all dealt with in a very honest and open way.
This paperback version includes three prefaces, each an update for each edition. The book is very very readable. I now plan to look for the books written by the landing Commander and the Brigadier in charge of land forces.
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