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Human Traffic Remixed [DVD] [1999]

John Simm    Suitable for 18 years and over   DVD
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (114 customer reviews)
Price: £3.50 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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Reviews

Product Description

A re-cut version of the 1999 debut feature from writer/director Justin Kerrigan which focuses on one wild weekend in Cardiff. A group of five friends escape the drab mundanity of daily existence and sample a hedonistic cocktail of drugs, clubs and sex. Jip (John Simm) is a twenty-something shop worker, Lulu (Lorraine Pilkington) is a full-on clubber, Moff (Danny Dyer) is a chilled-out dope dealer who also happens to be the son of a policeman, whilst Koop (Shaun Parkes) works in a record shop and gets increasingly paranoid that someone will steal his girlfriend Nina (Nicola Reynolds). Together, the five friends move from nightclubs to parties, getting more and more stoned as the night progresses. The soundtrack features club favourites by Fat Boy Slim, Underworld and Primal Scream.

From Amazon.co.uk

Five best friends, 48 hours and a bucketload of ecstasy pills make for an enjoyably lightweight slice of pop-cultural ephemera from debut director Justin Kerrigan. Cardiff is the city, and hardcore partying, clubbing and pubbing is on the menu as Jip (John Simm) and his renegade band of McJobbers clock off and head out for a weekend of debauchery. Among Jip's hedonistic posse are the cheeky cockney drug-dealer Moff (Danny Dyer), the terminally jealous boyfriend Koop (Shaun Parkes) and the bad-boy magnet Lulu (Lorraine Pilkington).

And that's pretty much it. Our heroes meet in a pub, get drunk, take drugs, go to a club, then to a party, then home and then meet up in another pub, just in time for the closing credits. Along the way there's a shamefully lethargic attempt to establish character back-story: Jip is temporarily sexually impotent because his mother's a prostitute; Koop's father is institutionalised; Lulu has nasty boyfriends; and Moff has conservative parents. But generally Human Traffic is happier at the heart of the party, celebrating the intoxication of club culture--which it does in style. Kerrigan pulls out all the formal stops with an energetic melange of jump cuts, slo-mo, and speeded-up "smudge" motion camerawork. There's also direct addresses to camera, fantasy sequences and some self-conscious cameos from DJ Carl Cox and former-drug dealer Howard Marks, author of Mr Nice. Wall-to-wall music from the likes of Fatboy Slim, William Orbit and even Primal Scream help paste over the occasional cracks in the veneer, which include some particularly duff lines ("We're gonna get more spaced than Neil Armstrong ever did!") and a drawn analysis of drug references in Star Wars, a nod to the films of Kevin Smith, such as Clerks, Mallrats and Chasing Amy. And if the whole project already feels dated and empty, well that's because it perfectly captures an essentially 1990s moment, and one gloriously empty weekend. --Kevin Maher

Review

Five best friends, 48 hours and a bucketload of ecstasy pills make for an enjoyably lightweight slice of pop-cultural ephemera from debut director Justin Kerrigan. Cardiff is the city, and hardcore partying, clubbing and pubbing is on the menu as Jip (John Simm) and his renegade band of McJobbers clock off and head out for a weekend of debauchery. Among Jip's hedonistic posse are the cheeky cockney drug-dealer Moff (Danny Dyer), the terminally jealous boyfriend Koop (Shaun Parkes) and the bad-boy magnet Lulu (Lorraine Pilkington). And that's pretty much it. Our heroes meet in a pub, get drunk, take drugs, go to a club, then to a party, then home and then meet up in another pub, just in time for the closing credits. Along the way there's a shamefully lethargic attempt to establish character back-story: Jip is temporarily sexually impotent because his mother's a prostitute; Koop's father is institutionalised; Lulu has nasty boyfriends; and Moff has conservative parents. But generally Human Traffic is happier at the heart of the party, celebrating the intoxication of club culture--which it does in style. Kerrigan pulls out all the formal stops with an energetic melange of jump cuts, slo-mo, and speeded-up "smudge" motion camerawork. There's also direct addresses to camera, fantasy sequences and some self-conscious cameos from DJ Carl Cox and former-drug dealer Howard Marks, author of Mr Nice. Wall-to-wall music from the likes of Fatboy Slim, William Orbit and even Primal Scream help paste over the occasional cracks in the veneer, which include some particularly duff lines ("We're gonna get more spaced than Neil Armstrong ever did!") and a drawn analysis of drug references in Star Wars, a nod to the films of Kevin Smith, such as Clerks, Mallrats and Chasing Amy. And if the whole project already feels dated and empty, well that's because it perfectly captures an essentially 1990s moment, and one gloriously empty weekend. -- --Kevin Maher

From the Back Cover

The weekend has changed forever. Totally re-cut with new scenes, new CGI effects and new tracks, Human Traffic Remixed is the definitive version of the ultimate movie for the chemical generation.

Revolving around a single drug-addled night out in Cardiff, Human Traffic Remixed follows the fortunes of Jip (John Simm), Lulu (Lorraine Pilkington), Koop (Shaun Parkes), Moff (Danny Dyer) and Nina (Nicola Reynolds). Together they set out to escape their mundane McJobs and create their largest weekend yet.

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