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Huckleberry Finn (Magnet classics) Paperback – 31 Dec 1988


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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Methuen Publishing Ltd (31 Dec 1988)
  • ISBN-10: 0416117929
  • ISBN-13: 978-0416117929
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 10.9 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (126 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,229,020 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Amazon Review

A seminal work of American literature that still commands deep praise and elicits controversy, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is essential to the understanding of the American soul. The recent discovery of the first half of Twain's manuscript, long thought to be lost, made front-page news. And this unprecedented edition, which contains for the first time omitted episodes and other variations present in the first half of the handwritten manuscript, as well as facsimile reproductions of thirty manuscript pages, is indispensable to a fuller understanding of the novel. The changes, deletions and additions made in the first half of the manuscript indicate that Mark Twain frequently checked his impulse to write an even darker, more confrontational book than the one he finally published. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn, It's the best book we've had. --Ernest Hemingway

The invention of this language, with all its implications, gave a new dimension to our literature. It is a language capable of poetry. --Robert Penn Warren --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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First Sentence
YOU don't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,1 but that ain't no matter. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 72 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Phillips on 25 Aug 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Back during my school days this was still not a book that was considered to be politically incorrect and so I was supposed to read it. As was far to often the case, I got by on little more than watching the movie version and never bothered to read this masterpiece. A few months ago I picked up a copy to put in my library for my grandson to use when he got old enough to go to school. Unfortunately this has been classified as a children's book and so I had little intention of reading it when I bought it.
After discussing a book about President Grant and Mark Twain with a friend I decided that I should read this book and I soon found out just how much of an adventure I had been missing. Twain's well deserved reputation as a storyteller is on clear display in this book from cover to cover. The reader is drawn into the lives of the characters to the point of being really disturbed when something bad happens to them. Sure, they steal and they lie but you will love them in spite of everything.
The story basically follows the adventures of young Huckleberry Finn and a runaway slave named Jim. Finn is trying to escape has father and the efforts of the townspeople to civilize him while Jim is trying to escape slavery. More to the point, Jim is trying to escape being sold down the river, which was always a worry for slaves in the upper south.
There is a strong moral point to this book as Huck slowly learns to love Jim as a friend and not think of his skin color. Early on Huck is worried about helping a runaway slave and isn't sure what to do. Having been raised in Missouri, Huck has been taught that helping a slave run away is one of the worst sins imaginable and that African-Americans are pretty much worthless except as slaves.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Littrell TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 5 Dec 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn is not only Twain's best work, but is considered by some, one of the greatest novels ever written. Episodic in form (as Twain warns, "persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot"), Huckleberry Finn is clearly, along with Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and Herman Melville's Moby-Dick, one of the three most ambitious and artistically successful novels of America's 19th century.
But what is it about Huckleberry Finn that makes it stand out? Most young people reading it will declare that they thought Tom Sawyer was better, and for them, they would be right. It is a difficult novel to teach. The dialect is actually difficult for some inexperienced readers. The satire and ironies are often lost on some readers, and some minorities are offended by what they think is its racist tone. That, however, is an historical irony if ever there was one. Twain's intent was to belittle and make fun of the racist attitudes of most Americans. The very fact that Jim and Huck were able to achieve a fast friendship and to negotiate together the epic journey down the Mississippi with Jim often showing superior wisdom and a right smart common sense did not sit well with some prejudicial mind sets. Today what offends is the language, in particular the use of the "n" word.
But what makes Huckleberry Finn a great novel is first and foremost the indelible character of the often self-effacing Huck Finn himself and his compelling, lyrical, and ever so beautifully observed narrative. There is only one other novel in American literature that can be considered in the same league as far as first person narratives go, and that is Nabokov's Lolita.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Dec 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
My mum read this to me (aged 8) and my brother (aged 10). We thought it was very funny and all the adventures Huck had were really cool. I liked the part where he said: "Telling the truth is like sitting on a keg of gunpowder and lighting it just to see where you'll go". It made us laugh a lot. We learnt a lot about superstitions, like touching a snakeskin brings bad luck, and a hairy chest makes you rich. But it wasn't funny to find out about how people used to think about slaves.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Feb 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Huckleberry Finn is illustrative of the world, not only in the cosmopolitan characters entering and leaving the story, but also in the way people react to it. One reaction is that it is a racist novel, mentioning the word nigger 121 times. The people who interpret the novel in this way seem only glance at the surface and delve no deeper. They probably do this in all other aspects of their life. The second type of person will look deeper, as though delving into the depths of the Mississippi River setting. They will see past the racism of Huckleberry Finn himself as Huck comments on the definite signs of humanity and equality in Jim. They will see the underlying message, of how he is the product of a terrible system and look into the other messages encountered in the journey of the book. To this type of person no other novel can be so fascinating, yet remain humorous all the while.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Jun 2010
Format: Paperback
I must admit that the first time I read Huck Finn was from the public library whilst still a mere nipper. I thoroughly enjoyed it and when I started secondary school and we did Tom Sawyer I kept thinking why can't we do Huck? We all think of Huck as a children's book these days but I hope to change your thoughts on this. For children this is a boys own adventure and can still captivate a young person's mind, but as we get older we find that this isn't really how we would judge this book.

We know that nowadays we aren't allowed to use the language or have the views set forth here, and Huck only slowly starts to realise that a black slave is still a person, but that isn't the main issue. When we are little we see this as an adventure, indeed many of us have dreamt about going along the Missippi on a raft, but as we get older we begin to realise that ultimately this book is full of humour. Whether we are reading of Jim the slave's superstitions or the exploits of a couple of conmen you start to realise that this book is genuinely funny, and is a comedy classic in its own right. Because of this you never really grow out of this book, it grows with you and that is probably one of its reasons for its sustained popularity. Mark Twain hit upon something here that you can never really tire of, finding new things in it all the time. Also if you want to bond with your son then reading this together can help to some degree.

In this Puffin Classics edition you have an introduction by Darren Shan as well as extras at the back, which include more about Mark Twain, the characters in this book and a glossary, as well as some discussion questions.
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