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How to Win Friends & Influence People Audio Download – Unabridged

4.6 out of 5 stars 845 customer reviews

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Audio Download, Unabridged, 17 Sep 2004
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Have you ever met someone that immediately made you feel at ease? Have you ever met someone who seems so pleasant and makes you genuinely feel good about yourself? Or someone that makes you feel inspired? Or someone who gives you confidence?
We probably all have at one time or another; and they've probably read this book! The easy-going, anecdotal style enables the reader to quickly understand the principles behind all all aspects of human interaction, and put into operation the principles in the book.
I used to be fairly confrontational and self-centred. If you stick to the principles in the book, you will notice that people become more co-operative, friendly, and you genuinely appreciate you more. And it's really easy to follow these simple rules because they make so much sense.
I didn't read the book to make friends (I've got loads already, honest!), but you do find people genuinely being more friendly towards you and listening to your point of view.
I think everyone should read this book. The title has become a bit of a catch phrase and a cliche, but it hasn't sold 16 million copies for nothing.
Buy it. Read it. And you'll probably end up recommending it to someone else.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dale Carnegie believed that the key to success is a lot less concerned with your professional knowledge in a subject area and a lot more about your abilities to arouse enthusiasm in others, to lead and to express your ideas. How to Win Friends and Influence People does exactly what it says on the tin, it teaches you how to win friends and influence people. One of those really famous books that more people have heard of then have read, if you are serious about becoming successful in life than this is a must read.

That last statement may seem a bit over the top but when you think about it, being successful, no matter what you regard as success, is all about human contact with other people and this book will teach you how to get the most out of every situation you are in. How to Win Friends and Influence People teaches the fundamentals of becoming interested in other people and becoming a good listener, which can make you a more likeable person. Alongside this it also teaches a lot of self-development principles and ways to become a leader.

The book starts off with the ‘Fundamental Techniques in Handling People’. These principles focus on being sincere and honest with people, showing appreciation and not criticising or complaining about others. The next part of the book focuses on ‘Six Ways to Make People Like You’. Some of these principles seem very straight forward such as simply smiling and using the name of the person you are talking to while you are talking to them. Although simple, how many of us do this on a regular basis? It is important for us to constantly renew our knowledge and to practice things that can help us in social situations such as these. He also talks about making others feel important and taking an interest in what the other person is interested in.
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By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 May 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In business, those who are the most "emotionally" intelligent always rise to the top. Why is that?
As a management consultant, I am always asking our clients and potential clients what their major issues are. It almost always boils down to persuading someone else to change. In many situations, the person describes the situation as getting worse rather than better.
As I ask more questions, I soon learn that the person I am talking to is totally thinking about the issue from her or his perspective, not the perspective of the person they want to influence. Carnegie describes a situation where he and his son couldn't get a calf into the barn. They pushed and pulled, and nothing worked. A maid came out, stuck her finger into the calf's mouth to simulate feeding and the calf followed her right into the barn.
As you can tell from that example, Carnegie is a student of the stimulus-response school of human behavior. The book is divided into four sections: Handling People; Getting People to Like You; Getting People to Agree with You; and Being a Leader. Each section is comprised of a few principles, which are each exemplified in a short chapter with a number of examples. Handling people has to do with avoiding the negative and unpleasant, appreciating the other person, and making the other person eager to accomplish some goal of their own.
Each section follows the same format. Basically, it's the same way that you train any living being. You provide positive feedback to the person which makes them feel better, the person responds positively to you making you feel better, you then help the other person to link what you want to share with them with something they want.
Many people will be offended by this idea.
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Format: Paperback
For a number of years I passed on reading Carnegie's work. The primary reason being that having dealt with a few people who did things the 'Carnegie way' I felt very uncomfortable with the kind of people they had become. One could easily argue they would have been those kinds of people with or without a Carnegie course and a paperback, and that's a reasonably sustainable argument. The problem really is though, that this book was clearly written by an American for an American audience (in 1936!); I know that is not the sales line but it is the truth. Henceforth, when the 'techniques' are applied to just about every culture outside of the United States then they have all the uncomfortableness of a brash woman wearing too much make-up, they ring too false and look too ridiculous. Maybe my comments will be seem by some as 'European elitism', but it's not that at all, it's simply a point of appropriation. A good number of what Carnegie talks about would simply laughed off in Europe as utterly banal and superficially repulsive - even if it were said or done with all sincerity. In my experience the over-use of names, the false enquiring of one's health, the formulaic compassion, the absurdity of remembering that your prospect ate chicken for dinner when you last met; and doesn't even remember that himself etc. is just too feigned and fictitious as to become repulsive. Likewise the whole notion that you can ask someone to do something if you simply spin them round, or that you should never berate people is poor psychology indeed. I agree that ONLY beration is unproductive but to motivate and challenge people of substance you need to raise the bar and use BOTH the twin tools of carrot AND the stick.Read more ›
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