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How To Be a Woman [Paperback]

Caitlin Moran
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (725 customer reviews)
RRP: 8.99
Price: 3.86 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Book Description

1 Mar 2012

It's a good time to be a woman: we have the vote and the Pill, and we haven't been burnt as witches since 1727. However, a few nagging questions do remain...

Why are we supposed to get Brazilians? Should we use Botox? Do men secretly hate us? And why does everyone ask you when you're going to have a baby?

Part memoir, part rant, Caitlin answers the questions that every modern woman is asking.


Frequently Bought Together

How To Be a Woman + Moranthology + How to Build a Girl
Price For All Three: 18.15

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  • Moranthology 6.29
  • How to Build a Girl 8.00


Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (1 Mar 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091940745
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091940744
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (725 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"I adore, admire and - more - am addicted to Caitin Moran's writing" (Nigella Lawson)

"I have been waiting for this book my whole life" (Claudia Winkleman)

"This might just be the funniest intelligent book ever written .. Moran's work packs a feminist punch in a way that Germaine Greer and an entire army of female eunuchs could never do, because she writes about things we've all done, thought, and said - but not quite so eloquently...the book everyone will be talking about" (Stylist)

"Moran's writing sparkles with wit and warmth. Like the confidences of your smartest friend" (Simon Pegg)

"It would almost be unkind to call this an important book, because what it mostly is is engaging, brave and consistently, cleverly naughtily funny, but actually it is important that we talk about this stuff" (Katy Guest Independent on Sunday)

Book Description

A new way to look at feminism from Caitlin Moran, one of our funniest writers

Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
283 of 299 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A must-read for women under 30 14 Aug 2011
Format:Paperback
...which I'm not, you understand. I've a decade on Caitin and grew up with the feminist debate raging about mine ears. For a while now I've been sighing heavily at how it seemed to have fallen off the cultural radar - no one seemed to be talking about it any more, let alone calling themselves a feminist. And now here's Ms Moran, putting the debate about what it means to be a woman in the 21st century not just back on the agenda, but in the non-fiction top 10. Hoo-blooming-ray! Look, there's heaps about this book that's annoying. The incessant CAPITAL LETTERS. The surfeit of screamers. Initially I felt like I was being shouted at, that the jokes weren't all funny, and this was a memoir masquerading as polemic. But unlike other reviewers who thought it petered out, I warmed to How to Be a Woman hugely. The writing seemed to calm down, become less personal, more thoughtful. So by the end I was converted. I've just been to buy a copy for my teenage goddaughter. She told me her ambition was to 'get married and go to parties' (presumably not in that order). So I hiked her by her beautiful long hair to the nearest bookshop and thrust a copy into her perfectly manicured hand. 'Read this,' I said. 'It's funny'. She may not agree with all or even any of it. But I think she's much more likely to actually read it than Germaine Greer or Simone de Beauvoir, and if it makes her think - just a bit - then I'll be pleased. And if she gains just a smidge more ambition, I'll be cockahoop. So if you've never read a book on feminism, read this one. And if you've read a few, read it too. It's contemporary, strident and wise. You'll also have a laugh, and crikey, there are a lot worse ways to spend your time.
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474 of 518 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Started well................... 30 July 2011
By Al
Format:Paperback
I'm giving this book 3 stars as an average based on the fact that at the beginning I thought I would be giving it 5 but by the end I wanted to give it just 1.

My girlfriend has been asking me to read this book for a while (for the record I am male but like to think I am as liberal as they come). Eventually I acquiesced and started reading with few expectations (I had never heard of Caitlin Moran before I picked this up). I thought the prologue was great. It was genuinely funny (even made me laugh out loud a couple of times which almost never happens), well written, and engaging. The next few chapters were just good, though I felt like it could have done with some ruthless editing of the bits that weren't quite so funny or poignant to make it great. But towards the middle of the book things started to go downhill, pretty steeply.

One of the problems with the book is that the author talks as if everything is black or white, gloriously righteous or disgustingly evil. In the beginning when she is talking about obvious things (woman should have the same opportunities as men, etc..) this is fine. It's when she gets into more debatable arguments (strip clubs= evil, burlesque shows + pole dancing lessons= fantastic), even about things that I agree on (e.g. pro-choice, aethiesm) that this starts to grate. She treats the idea that any opinion other than her own could have any validity with contempt and doesn't really put forward any cogent arguments for her reasoning (but basically devolves into semi-coherent rants over and over again- and this is coming from someone who actually agrees with the broad points she is making!!).

She talks in sweeping generalizations and sometimes contradicts herself.
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358 of 405 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Banal and unoriginal 29 July 2011
Format:Paperback
I bought this book on a whim, having read a couple of rather mixed reviews. In that context, I was anticipating something entertaining and mildly stimulating. I was not expecting Isiah Berlin. But even against those less-than-demanding criteria, this book disappoints hugely.

Caitlin Moran entered journalism as a teenager, after winning competitions in national broadsheets including The Observer and The Times. Tellingly, these are omitted from this largely autobiographical book, which instead has her entering journalism at 16 when she went to work for Melody Maker. No doubt this version of history is more consistent with the edgy rise from working class obscurity she seeks to portray. I'm three years younger than Moran, and used to read her columns in my parents' copy of the Times, until I left home at 18, switched my allegiance to The Guardian, and lost track of her. So it was a strange experience to pick up this book and discover that, in terms of her attitudes and prose style, she seems to have become frozen in time as that precocious 16 year old - a kind of journalistic Dorian Gray. But what was endearing in a teenager is utterly infuriating - and oddly jarring- in a mature woman. The language is relentlessly mannered, with copious use of capitals and outdated slang from the 90s. This I could forgive if the book contained a single original idea, but the content is as banal, derivative and vacuous as the prose.

Take the chapter where she bemoans the lack of suitable female role models, and bizarrely juxtaposes Philip Roth with Demi Moore, Kim Cattrall and Madonna. This is simply baffling- comparing not so much apples and oranges as apples and donkeys.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Honest, funny and easy to identify with
I hadn't heard of Caitlin Moran before. Amazing I know, considering I live in the UK. I really enjoyed this book. It's a very easy read and would make a good holiday read. Read more
Published 1 day ago by Mel J Crowe
5.0 out of 5 stars Made me laugh and cry which not many books have ...
Made me laugh and cry which not many books have done over the years.
I am confused by how she has the same rock idols as me despite being 20 years younger
Published 2 days ago by Mrs Jenny Taggart
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book
great stuff, fresh thinking on an old issue. Bravo
Published 4 days ago by Roger James Elsgood
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Fabulous!
Published 4 days ago by Ruth Dodridge
3.0 out of 5 stars Overrated (in my opinion)
A bit overrated I think, but a good read, particularly for younger women who don't really 'get' feminism. Some parts very funny.
Published 4 days ago by Country Chick
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow
I was a bit apprehensive of picking up this book as I wasn't really into feminism and was recommended it by a friend. Turns out I am a feminist. Who knew? Thanks Caitlin.
Published 6 days ago by Anon
3.0 out of 5 stars Didn, tlike the language in this book, and ...
Didn,tlike the language in this book, and couldn,t get on with it
Published 9 days ago by House Fairy
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Excellent
Published 10 days ago by Chrissie
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh out Loud in Public!
An absolutely outstanding read - laughed out loud in public several times. Will make you laugh, cry and feel better about just about everything. A must read for all women!
Published 11 days ago by Ms Book Nerd
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book
She's a great author, really eye opening and funny. Well written, provocative and just a must for all women out there
Published 11 days ago by Zed
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