How To Read Derrida and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more

Buy New

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Buy Used
Used - Good See details
Price: 2.81

or
 
   
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading How To Read Derrida on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

How to Read Derrida [Paperback]

Penelope Deutscher
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 6.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 24 Aug.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 3.60  
Paperback 6.99  

Book Description

3 Oct 2005 How to Read
An idiosyncratic and highly controversial French philosopher, Jacques Derrida inspired profound changes in disciplines as diverse as law, anthropology, literature and architecture. In Derrida's view, texts and contexts are woven with inconsistencies and blindspots, which provide us with a chance to think in new ways about, among other things, language, community, identity and forgiveness. Derrida's suggestions for "how to read" lead to a new vision of ethics and a new concept of responsibility. Penelope Deutscher discusses extracts from the full range of Derrida's work, including. Of Grammatology, Dissemination, Limited Inc, The Other Heading: Reflections on Europe, Monolinguism of the Other, Given Time, and Force of Law.

Frequently Bought Together

How to Read Derrida + How to Read Wittgenstein
Buy the selected items together
  • How to Read Wittgenstein 5.24


Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Books (3 Oct 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1862077681
  • ISBN-13: 978-1862077683
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 257,954 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Deconstruction is not neutral. It intervenes' Jacques Derrida

About the Author

Penelope Deutscher is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Northwestern University. Her books include Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy, and A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The purity of the inside can only be restored if the charges are brought home against exteriority as a supplement, inessential yet harmful to the essence, a surplus that ought never to have come to be added to the untouched plenitude of the inside. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best guide to Derrida available 30 Jan 2006
Format:Paperback
The very idea of writing an introduction to Derrida, inevitably, always, leads to the practice of its impossibility.

One is never quite satisfied with what one reads, because like all supplements introductions tantalize us with the possibility of plenitude. YES! This is it: I have DERRIDA! However, in practice we are always left feeling empty - sometimes emptier than we began.

Derrida is somehow always ahead of us: an elusive, ghostly figure like David Bowie in Labyrinth.

However, this effort by Penelope Deutscher is much better than most other attempts: it is clearly written, with many well chosen examples to illustrate important Derridean insights. It also has the bonus ('supplement' if you will) of addressing some of Derrida's later concerns(such as 'Mourning' 'Hospitality' and 'Forgiveness'), which are suspiciously absent in most other introductions; although, admittedly, the ideas in these latter chapters are not as clearly delineated as the first few chapters on Derrida's early work. However, this is perhaps more due to the complexity of these later insights, rather than problems with Deutscher's elucidations.

All in all, this is the best recent introduction to Derrida that I know of (and I've read a fair few). In fact, I cannot think of a better place to begin (other than (there is always an other than, isn't there?) actually reading the works of the Derrida himself).
Was this review helpful to you?
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lucid, Powerful Writing -- yet "Unfinished" 28 Mar 2006
Format:Paperback
A reader is not the same as an introduction or a beginner's guide. It selects key passages from an author, and "brings the reader face-to-face with the writing itself in the company of an expert guide". Thus Penelope Deutscher explains -- or perhaps one should say explicates -- key passages of Derrida. This she does very well -- and while it is not easy reading, it is not inscrutable if one is prepared to concentrate.
In the main, Deutscher would seem to have chosen crucial extracts of Derrida. They are passages which should be read and understood. She takes little for granted, and explains all that needs to be explained to the reader -- lucidly and intelligently. In fact she effectively communicates the de(con)structive power of his work. She further draws comparisons between Derrida's early and late work, and highlights a few of the issues that were problematic to Derrida himself.
There were two things that I missed in this book. Firstly, I would have welcomed a more thorough comparison between Derrida's post-structuralism and the structuralism or (more broadly) modernism that went before. Secondly, Derrida's ideas were highly controversial, and there was little hint of this in the commentary. For what it is worth, however, this book is well written, and does much to deepen one's insight into Derrida.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must, if you start reading Derrida! 10 Jun 2011
By BigMan
Format:Paperback
Don't even START to read Derrida before you have read this... You will get so much more out of his books if you do. Delivered quickly and correctly.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
8 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A marvel of sorts! 28 Oct 2007
Format:Paperback
On a first reading this text has all the appetencies of a broadly conceptualising coda inserted keenly into the key debates. Yet One should perhaps reread it in the light of Arthur Travick's particularly astute demolition of Himmelthweit's notion of the delirious apostate, which might also usefully be overlain with some of the better known procrastinations of Jacqueline Rose in the matter of the deciduous vaginal effluvia, notoriously dissected in Martha Kronstadt's exegesis of the "Tom Thumb" myth. As for Derrida, one hates to dispute the grandeur of the Master Father, to suggest that His dehistoricised desire is a fortuitously designed and in fact concretely designated meta-discourse, but One is impelled to that conclusion by the issue of intertextual facilitation. The issue here is beyond the narrational, it touches on the structural. As for Jackie Rose, One thinks it maybe pertinent, that when once asked in Canterbury whether Cartesian aspectuality might be inserted into Hegelian praxis, (or the other way round?) she launched into a volley of amendments. Meanwhile, the answer posed in the title of this book, how to read Derrida, may best be couched as a determination never, ever, to read Derrida. Rather leave him - as it were, (un)read, and to thereby un-say and therefore to unseat him. Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful 23 April 2006
By Rev. Thomas Scarborough - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A reader is not entirely the same as an introduction or a beginner's guide. It selects key passages from an author, and "brings the reader face-to-face with the writing itself in the company of an expert guide". Thus Penelope Deutscher explains -- or perhaps one should say explicates -- key passages of Derrida. This she does very well -- and while it is not easy reading, it is not inscrutable if one is prepared to concentrate.

In the main, Deutscher would seem to have chosen crucial extracts of Derrida. These are passages which should be read and understood. She takes little for granted, and explains all that needs to be explained to the reader -- lucidly and intelligently. In fact she effectively communicates the striking de(con)structive power of his work. She further draws comparisons between Derrida's early and late work, and highlights a few issues that were problematic to Derrida himself.

There were two things that I missed in this book. Firstly, I would have welcomed a more thorough comparison between Derrida's post-structuralism and the structuralism or (more broadly) modernism that went before. Secondly, Derrida's ideas were highly controversial, and there was little hint of this in Deutscher's commentary. However, for what it is worth, this is a book well written, and it does much to deepen one's insight into Derrida.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction to Derrida 1 May 2006
By Thomas McDonald - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Even though I've a good grasp of other difficult continental philosophers (important influences on Derrida) such as Hegel and Heidegger, I still felt a barrier to 'getting' deconstruction. This book helps to clarify the gist of textual deconstruction and Derrida's implicit political motives. I've come to the conclusion that much of the 'barrier' to understanding Derrida has to do with problems in his (anti-)philosophy, which come to light, for instance, by comparing his work with that of Deleuze who also develops a "philosophy of difference," yet without avoiding the question of substance which contemporary thought must address anew. I had read other 'introducing..' type books, but most of them simplify the material too much. For the dillegent, focused reader, this book yields a good middle way to comprehension between Derrida's daunting original texts and other introductory books.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good introduction. 27 Sep 2007
By A. Brooke - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book is a great introduction into Derrida's work. It combines his actual writings with easy to read explanations. I am sure to get more of the "How to Read" series.
5.0 out of 5 stars Exquisite clarity of Derrida's profound abstraction 15 Jan 2013
By Wayne - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Penelope Deutscher is one of the few masters of Derrida, and yet she packs into 100 pages for beginning readers, lucid insight into the notoriously abstract Continental philosopher (aren't they all), Jacques Derrida.

Deutscher begins by describing deconstruction in chapter one. Ultimately, deconstruction is a process of taking on one-sided arguments which argue in favor of a privileged "ideal" perspective (whether in philosophy, religion, public policy, genetics, etc.) breaking down the privileged term or approach, taking it apart and exposing its weakness in order to reveal a more realistic, complex, integrated and comprehensive position (i.e., not the false accusations of nihilism or just negation).

The second chapter "Reading as Intervention" outlines four outcomes of reading deconstructively:

1. Identification of contradictions, inconsistencies

2. Changing a text by making it more foreign, enabling a change of understanding what we have believed in the past

3. New ways of conceiving the onus of responsibility, new implication of ethics

4. New possibilities for transformation through their relationship with 'impossibility' (a favored term by Derrida)

And on she goes through chapters on Differance, Undecidables, Culture, Context of Communication, Mourning and Hospitality, Giving and Forgiving, Justice and the Law, Perfectibility.

Enjoy.
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction to the pluralistic ideology of deconstruction 17 Mar 2007
By Jason - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a very clearly written and confident exposition of Derrida's main ideas. Written by a true believer in deconstruction, so it does avoid tackling inconsistencies in Derrida's thought, and is sometimes gushing in its praise. I found his notion of the 'impossibility' of interpersonal acts such as gift-giving and forgiveness to be especially weak, since these concepts are assumed to imply some kind of Platonic 'purity' of meaning that is then self-cancelling. This exposes the dependence of deconstruction on the very metaphysical certainties it claims to counter. For example, in concepts such as 'democracy-to-come' the myth of some 'original' truth is simply replaced with a 'barely possible' utopian ideal which is then forever delayed.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback