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How To Raise Emotionally Healthy Children: Meeting The Five Critical Needs of Children...and Parents Too! Updated Edition
 
 

How To Raise Emotionally Healthy Children: Meeting The Five Critical Needs of Children...and Parents Too! Updated Edition [Kindle Edition]

Gerald Newmark
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: £1.87 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Product Description

Product Description

How To Raise Emotionally Healthy Children is a wake-up call to America that we are abandoning our children emotionally. Failure to support our children's emotional health at home and in schools is jeopardizing their future and that of our nation. The book has a compelling and provocative message about parent-child relations. It provides powerful and practical concepts and tools that enable parents, teachers, and childcare providers to interact with children and with each other in emotionally healthy ways. In the process, children learn to interact with each other in the same way. How to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children, shows parents and teachers how to nourish emotional health at home and at school. Failure to meet these emotional needs of our children is one of the most serious and under-recognized problems facing our country. The book enables parents to recognize and satisfy the five critical emotional needs that all children have: to feel respected, important, accepted, included, and secure, and in the process, parents will have their own needs satisfied too. Babies, toddlers, children, teenagers, parents and grandparents all have these same emotional needs. Meeting these needs in childhood provides the foundation for success in school, work, relationships, marriage and life in general.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 230 KB
  • Print Length: 163 pages
  • Publisher: NMI Publishers; Updated Edition edition (6 Jan 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004I8WLSO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #86,607 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Helpful 8 Oct 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I've read a lot of parenting books that go over the same principles again and again. But this ebook brought new principles into the mix and gave me new guidance which is really helpful. Would recommend this book to every parent!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST READ 10 July 2012
Format:Kindle Edition
Emotionally healthy children! Wow! Wouldn't the world be a wonderful place if those children could grow up to be emotionally healthy adults?! Dr Newmark's highly practical and beautifully written book guides parents and all of us working with children telling us how to avoid making dangerous in consequences mistakes and take care of children's five all important emotional needs.
No wonder the book has already been read by hundreds of thousands of parents - it is a MUST READ for every parent and every teacher!
Eva Hoffman
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5.0 out of 5 stars How to raise emotionally healthy children 2 May 2012
By Sue
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book is brilliant, it has been very helpfull giving advice on how to talk to children and what to say in certain circumstances. I would recommend all parents to read this book. I have tried out a few of the techniques and they do work its really amazing.
I am a foster parent and mother and found the book a must have.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  84 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What parents want to know but don't know who to ask 10 Nov 2008
By Rose Marie Thaler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
My husband and I were very young parents with not a clue as how to raise our children. Our lives and our
children's lives would have been so much easier if this book had only been written then. We go to school to
learn the 3 R's, but there is no school for parenting. This book is so insightful, and makes so much sense, it
should be read by every person who has or expects to have children.
Thank you Dr. Newmark. Your book will have a positive effect on all the children and parents who read and use
it.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Short MUST read for ALL Parents... 9 Nov 2008
By Laurie Haessly - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
"How To Raise Emotionally Healthy Children" is a simple, easy-to-follow guide that teaches parents how to communicate respectfully with their children. The book is based on their 5 critical needs: feeling respected, important, accepted, included and secure (don't we all want this?) and how to meet these needs. All I had to do was just shift my thinking a bit to implement the strategies. The strategies make sense and they work - not only communicating with my teenagers (yes, with teenagers) but with my husband and my co-workers, too. The bottom-line: Why didn't I think of this?
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars How to raise children who are not emotionaly scarred, but not actually emotionally healthy 29 July 2013
By Artemus Archer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The absence of emotional illness does not actually mean emotional health just as the absence of disease does not actually mean the presence of health. Perhaps I am not the intended audience for this book which is why I didn't enjoy it. Given all the good reviews on Amazon, I'm glad that there are people who have benefited from the book.

Having said that, here were some of the issues I had with the book:

Newmark appears to be attempting to make amends for his own childrearing mistakes.

Much of the actual good advice in the book seems to be geared toward emotionally unhealthy/abusive adults who are raising children.

If you have common sense and are reflective, then this book may be too elementary for you.

What really bothered me about the book was the anecdotes Newmark uses -- they don't sound real. For example on page 30-31, Newmark talks about a family meeting in which 11 year old Robert tells his mother that she is "being 'miscellaneoused' to death." I highly doubt that those words actually came from a real 11 year old boy. In another anecdote on page 55, a mother is impatiently trying to change the diaper of her 4-month-old. Her father says nothing but decides to call her on the phone later on and "tactfully" critiqued her and made a suggestion on how to handle the baby so that there was less fussing. Supposedly the very next day, mom calls her dad to thank him for his advice. First of all, most people don't take criticism very well no matter how tactful it is; so I have a hard time believing someone so insensitive to their baby today would be calling her father to thank him the very next day. Second, I find it hard to believe that someone who had been so insensitive to her baby's need for gentleness during diaper changing time would be able to completely change the habit in one day. It just seemed far-fetched.

The advice is too general to be helpful, and when there are specifics, it seems inappropriate. For example, on page 59, Newmark remarks that "including the child in decision-making enhances her sense of importance." This is true, but in this context, the child had been having sleepovers with an older man (her boyfriend). Children should be included in making certain decisions as appropriate, and I believed in this case it was inappropriate for the child to be allowed to make this decision.

There are many examples of teenagers and older children in the book behaving disrespectfully, and Newmark's advice is to "give the child the benefit of the doubt," "let them make decisions," etc. In many of these scenarios, if the child has gotten to that age and is behaving that way, it's an indication of earlier parenting mistakes which means that the child hasn't shown the maturity to be making decisions or given the benefit of the doubt.

In another example, a child was caught shoplifting by his mother. Rather than actually disciplining him, she made him give the toy back and apologize. This doesn't actually teach the child that stealing is wrong nor does it teach the child that the consequence was negative. The child ended up exactly where he started -- without the toy; and forcing a child to apologize does not actually mean that he is sorry for what he did. I have students who plagiarize papers and the consequence to plagiarism is an F on the assignment. Many of my students seem to think that the "punishment" for plagiarizing should be that they have to write the paper -- which is exactly what they should have done in the first place.

A much better book with good practical advice are the books in the Love and Logic Magic series. Here they give real, practical advice for how to handle misbehaviors from children in a way that actually teaches them consequences, good decision making and without compromising their emotional health.

I also like the work of Gordon Neufield and Gabor Mate who wrote "Hold On To Your Kids"
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Common Sense Parenting 19 Nov 2008
By kathy Bauer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
How To Raise Emotionally Healthy Children: Meeting The Five Critical Needs of Children...And Parents Too! Updated Edition
Parenting is the toughest job we can ever love. Yet in these challenging times many parents find they need help to cope. This book offers practical ideas to create the families we want - families that respect one another, where all feel secure, accepted, important and included. This is the framework that helps parents examine how they treat family members and themselves. Filled with examples from toddlers to teens, parents will find this book easy and enjoyable to read.
As a parent and a parent educator, my favorite chapter is chapter 4: "Becoming a Professional Parent: Child rearing is too important to leave to chance." In this chapter, Dr. Newmark discusses practical ideas to apply strategies used by professionals to the art of parenting. For example, parents need to develop a game plan and make conscious choices of how they use their time. This means having priorities straight and developing a plan to create the home and family life that is important to them. And professionals monitor their own progress and are willing to adjust plans and to get creative to meet goals. Parents are encouraged to keep a journal to note progress and challenges.
We have used the book as the basis of reading groups and parents report how helpful it is because it gives parents a way to make decisions about which strategy is best for their children and the emotional health of each family member.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent 24 Nov 2012
By Janelle Hoxie - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I was pleasantly surprised by this well thought out book on showing respect to children. You know the author knows what he's talking about when you are nodding your head in agreement for practically the entire book. We definitely command and scold far too often. We need to create a positive environment. My husband always says that we can't be permissive parents, but being a positive parent is NOT being a permissive parent. You can be positive and still have boundaries for your kids. When we focus too much on discipline and training, we forget their very critical emotional needs.
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Popular Highlights

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&quote;
We need to avoid sarcasm, belittling, yelling; we need to keep anger and impatience to a minimum; we need to avoid lying; we need to listen more and talk less; we need to command less and suggest and request more; we need to learn how to say “please,” “thank you,” “excuse me” “I'm sorry”—yes, even to children. &quote;
Highlighted by 52 Kindle users
&quote;
These are the need to feel respected, important, accepted, included, and secure. &quote;
Highlighted by 42 Kindle users
&quote;
Parents don't always have to do something about a child's hurt feelings. Just being there and listening may be enough to comfort the child. &quote;
Highlighted by 27 Kindle users

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