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How Music Works Hardcover – 13 Sep 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 358 pages
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd (13 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0857862502
  • ISBN-13: 978-0857862501
  • Product Dimensions: 18.6 x 3.6 x 23.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 226,749 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

It was wildly ambitious to try and turn this galaxy of theory into a readable work of scholarship but Byrne has done it, and done it with style. Brian Eno might as well cancel that book deal now Mark Ellen, The Observer

A very involving read - Byrne is good company - he has a gift for a telling analogy that makes complex points easily grasped Keith Bruce The Herald

Incisive and intriguing Nick Curtis, The Evening Standard

As well as being an investigation into the context in which music is made, How Music Works is an accomplished celebration of an ever-evolving art form that can alter how we look at ourselves and the world Fiona Sturges, Independent

How Music Works is a melange of bookish musings on how music is shaped by the places it is played and the technology used to create and disseminate it Danny Eccleston, MOJO

David Byrne deserves great praise for How Music Works. It is as accessible as pop yet able to posit deep and startlingly original thoughts and discoveries in almost every paragraph. Not unlike getting your ears syringed, this book will make you hear music in a different way... Every form of music, from birdsong onwards, is considered and elegantly related to form, debunking romantic conceits about music and presenting a far more beautiful rationality. In the process, Byrne shows not just how music works, but how music publishing should work too Oliver Keens, The Sunday Telegraph

An entertaining and erudite book ... this is a serious, straight-forward account of an art from that also manages to be inspiring Peter Aspden, Financial Times

How Music Works is not just a noticeably handsome book but a beguiling and hugely perceptive one too Jonathan O'Brien, Sunday Business Post

A big beautiful work of art... As you might expect from someone as intelligent and open-minded as Byrne, How Music Works is a far ranging and astute look at all the facets of music Doug Johnstone, The Big Issue

Creators of all stripes will find much to inspire them in Mr Byrne's erudite musings on the biological and mathematical underpinnings of sound... His observations on the nature of pattern and repetition, and on people's neurological response to aesthetic experience, apply to all creative fields The Economist

Given the vastness of the subject, calling a treatise How Music Works seems intellectually arrogant, but it could also be seen as disarmingly frank, a fresh perspective from a down-to-earth mind. David Byrne's book, although a self-conscious art object (backwards pagination, upholstered cover and so on) contains plenty of plain-spoken, sensible observations: a dichotomy typical of the man Guardian

It's a great book to pick up and start at any chapter, a hugely rewarding and enriching read. A fascinating look at music from many angles, I would receommend it to anyone who plays or simply has an interest in the history and evolution of the musical form, the culture of music, both as a well of inspiration and as a simple commodity Irish Times

An ambitious attempt at understanding a phenomenon to which the former Talking Head has dedicated his life's work John Doran, Quietus

By investigating how music works, Byrne shows us how best it can be used. We are all the richer for his effort Yo Zushi, New Statesman

Disarmingly frank, a fresh perspective from a down-to-earth mind Michel Faber, The Guardian

How Music Works is a big, beautiful work of art ... a far-ranging and astute look at all facets of music ... This is a really rather remarkable book The Big Issue --The Big Issue

The finest music book of the year ... Handsomely bound, beautifully printed, wittily illustrated, it would make a beautiful collector's item but there is much more going on between the covers ... bursting with a sense of free-flowing curiosity Neil McCormick, The Daily Telegraph

Fascinating look at music's power to move Alexis Petridis, The Guardian

Unique among a deluge of music biographies and autobiographies coming out this Christmas, this wildly ambitious book breaks the mould Arthur House, The Sunday Telegraph

Byrne is a crisp and enthusiastic guide Rob Fitzpatrick, The Sunday Times

Creators of all stripes will find much to inspire them in Mr Byrne's erudite musings on the biological and mathematical underpinnings of sound, from Plato to Copernicus and from John Cage to Tantric Buddhists. How Music Works should be required reading for all writers and publishers The Economist

As accessible as pop yet able to posit deep and startlingly original thoughts and discoveries in almost every paragraph ... this book will make you hear music in a different way Oliver Keens, The Sunday Telegraph

How Music Works in as entertaining and erudite book ... The chapter on the economics of music should be required reading for all 16-year-olds tinkering with their GarageBand software and dreaming of dollar signs Peter Aspden, Financial Times

[A] wide-ranging tome Geeta Daval, Wired Magazine

Not just a noticeably handsome book ... but a beguiling and hugely perceptive one too Jonathan O'brien Sunday Business Post

A fluid, intelligent analysis' --Patrick Freyne, The Irish Times

Book Description

David Byrne's internationally bestselling magnum opus on the subject of music --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Paperback.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Highly enjoyable, well-informed and fluently written account of how music works on us and through us. Byrne considers the history, reception, and making of music from his perspective as a practicing musician. Whether you like his music or not (and I do), this book will increase your knowledge and awareness of what music does and how it achieves its effects. Byrne is thoughtful and scholarly in his approach without being obscure or needlessly lofty. I listen better now and enjoy music, any kind of music, more thoroughly.
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Format: Hardcover
...the title flatters to deceive. "How Music Works for Me" would have been a more accurate description. This is really no more than a loose collection of David Byrne's musings on the music biz with a little bit of pseudo-science thrown into the mix.

As it is, it is an entertaining, but sometimes loose-knit and rambly selection that could have done with some serious editing. Unfortunately, Byrne draws no distinction between drawing on his own experiences (which is interesting), and drawing on accepted knowledge (which is infuriating). For example, admitting that he has next to no knowledge of Western Classical music does not stop him from comparing its performing tradition unfavourably with his own brand of "music for the people" based purely on the (supposed) demographic of its audience.

I have always enjoyed David Byrne and Talking Heads' recorded music and rate "Stop Making Sense" as one of the very best music films ever made - but he is less than honest about his aims in this book - which makes it a frustrating read. Had he done a bit more research, and relied less on received opinions in some areas, it could have been a much more interesting read.
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By Peter Lee TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 4 Dec. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What exactly is this book trying to be? In places it seems to be an autobiography of David Byrne's recording career both with Talking Heads and as a solo artist, but then it is an analysis of the record industry in general plus an essay on different types of concert venue and the structure of classical music. It is almost always interesting but not being a musician I did struggle with some of the technical bits on musical constructs, and found some sections a little heavy going, but the parts about Talking Heads made me want to watch "Stop Making Sense" again. Did it tell me how music worked? Not really, but it was for the most part an enjoyable read.

Incidentally, a few irritations for Kindle readers: The book is fairly heavily illustrated, but the illustrations (in the text rather than a separate section) often appear a fair way on from their mentions rather than after the paragraph concerned, and there are numerous typos where words run together.
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Format: Paperback
David Byrne’s How Music Works couldn’t be more different to the last music-related book I read, which was Morrissey’s Autobiography…actually, that’s wrong, if that last sentence was true Byrne’s book would have to be an iceberg or a classification system for light aircraft or a herbal treatment for verrucas, whereas it is, like Mozzer’s, largely an account of the late 20th century music business written by the former singer of an original, literate, musically accomplished and critically adored band. But you get my point. Morrissey’s effort (or at least the second half of it) is a hilarious and highly subjective broadside against the massed incompetent and grasping industry forces that he perceives to have been responsible for sabotaging his career and indeed life over the last quarter century. Byrne’s on the other hand is perky, user-friendly and downright educational, consisting as it does of a series of self-contained chapters that each address one aspect of how music is made, appreciated and marketed. You can imagine these units starting life as a lecture series, to be delivered alongside audio-visual material organised via Powerpoint – there are even helpful, referenced, illustrations of the type typical of this sort of presentation included in the book.

Despite its preppy, slightly earnest approach though How Music Works turns out to be an excellent read, putting forward some genuinely revealing and valuable insights into what makes musical performances and recordings really live and hacking efficiently through some of the mysteries and contradictions of record company practices.
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Format: Paperback
I'm a long-time fan of David Byrne and really enjoyed his musings on the creative process whilst in Talking Heads, his solo work, and with his numerous and diverse collaborators. He rarely adopts the same process twice and is always looking for new ways to stimulate and explore his creativity.

Some of this book deals with the history of music: recording techniques, marketing, different types of music etc. I was less interested in some of these sections as I was already familiar with a lot of the information.

The book concludes with a lengthy chapter on the various models by which a working musician or composer can make a living in the modern era. I am not a musician or composer however this chapter is full of interesting information and could be invaluable for anyone seeking to make a career out of music.
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