Buy Used
£2.77
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

How Low Can You Go? Round Europe for 1p Return (+ Tax) Paperback – 3 May 2007


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£0.30 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton; Reprint edition (3 May 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340937858
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340937853
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 21.5 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 634,355 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Tom Chesshyre was born in London in 1971. He studied politics at Bristol University and newspaper journalism at City University, after which he worked at the Coventry Evening Telegraph, the Cambridge Evening News, Sporting Life, Sky Sports, The Daily Telegraph and The Independent before joining the The Times in 1997. He helped research two non-fiction books: W. G. by Robert Low, a biography of W. G. Grace, and Carlos: Portrait of a Terrorist by Colin Smith. He is the author of five travel books: How Low Can You Go? Round Europe for 1p Each Way (Plus Tax), 2007; To Hull and Back: On Holiday in Unsung Britain, 2010; Tales from the Fast Trains: Europe at 186mph, 2011; A Tourist in the Arab Spring, 2013; and Gatecrashing Paradise: Misadventures in the Real Maldives, just published - a description of a 600-mile journey around the edge of paradise, touching on its (often ignored) darker side while island hopping round some of the most beautiful, remote spots on the planet. He lives in London. His website is www.tomchesshyre.co.uk


Product Description

Review

Offers a passenger-eye view of this amazing revolution. Fasten your seatbelts, it's a wonderful ride. (Mail on Sunday)

Highly readable Bill-Bryson-esque travel writing... Chesshyre asks some timely questions, among them the ethics of flying and the cultural, not to say racial, damage inflicted by the dreaded stag-party outing (Telegraph)

If it's unspellable and unpronounceable, Chesshyre has been there, travelling steerage. (The Times)

While never lacking in humour - even in darkest Szczecin, Poland (where he goes for 1p) - Tom also makes a valid environmental point. (Mirror)

The resulting book is a larky yet thoughtful tour of New Europe, during which Chesshyre braves local tipples, leaps into icepools and joins some very British stag nights. (Daily Mail)

Book Description

Funny, up-to-the-minute travel writing that explores the furthest reaches of no-frill, high-thrills Europe

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Half Man, Half Book on 21 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback
Following the advent of low cost airline, Tom Chesshyre decides to take off round Europe on them and to see where it gets him and for how much money.

His lowest prices seat is 1p, hence the title of the book, and he spends an average of £48 per flight. These are 2006/2007 prices though. He manages to go to some obscure parts of Europe, reom Finland, his furthest northerly point, down to Croatia and the Czech republic. Most of the time he enjoys where he visits, and find the locals amenable to him and his fellow travellers, but there is the odd place where I don't think that he will be returning to.

He also meets with the chairman of easyJet and the director of Friends of the Earth to look at the business and environmental aspects. They have, as you would expect, widely differing perspectives of the effects of cheap air travel on the environment. I think this adds a good balance to the book, rather than just making it a series of weekend jollies.

A good travel book, now outdated. Glad I read it though.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. W. Lawson on 1 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
When Ryanair first released their penny flights, I was highly sceptical of where they'd go. Thankfully - my mum and I got to Krakow and back, a beautiful city.

It was fascinating reading about Mr. Chessyre's adventures, particularly those in Szczecin and Poprad.

Well worth reading to open your eyes on unseen Europe.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By An Historian on 25 Jun. 2007
Format: Paperback
I laughed like a drain reading this description of some dozen cities

behind the old Iron Curtain. Not the usual tourist haunts of Amsterdam, Pargue and Paris but new destinations with wonderfully unpronouncable places in Slovakia, Slovenia, Estonia and the rest, all accessible thanks to cheap flights.

Mr Chesshyre writes sympathetically about each. Only one place stands out as grim and unfriendly (I will not spoil the surprise and tell you which). As for the others, each has a gem or two that are worth seeing

and makes the flight really worthwhile. If you like Bill Bryson, you will like this, especially as Mr Chesshyre goes one step further than Mr Bryson and interviews the locals. This is a book which is great to read

on a flight or waiting at the airport. It will make a great Xmas stocking filler. I could have done without the chapter on the anti-airplane eco-warrior, a self-righteous and rather dull figure who reveals that he actually flies six times a year; it is there to provide balance with a super chapter on Stelios who gives a great account as to why it is morally right to fly and to fly often. Morally right and great, great fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By D. Robson on 15 May 2007
Format: Paperback
How to explain, to those too timid to have tried it, the joy of buying a preposterously cheap flight to somewhere you have never heard of, then pitching up there on spec? I have bought 0.01p flights myself, to places as diverse as Leipzig and Montpellier, so I know where Tom Chesshyre is coming from. How Low Can You Go?, his wryly readable account of "doing" Eastern Europe by low-cost airline, prepared to go literally anywhere, however unpronounceable, provided only the fare is 0.01p, is a true hymn to the Easyjet age. Some of the places he visits, like Brno in the Czech Republic, sound comically awful, but then doesn't masochism, a gluttony for punishment, lie at the heart of most good travel writing? The book can't replace conventional travel guides: there is not enough detail on individual cities. But it captures something of the zeitgesit of the Europe of the early 21st century. In ten years, we will all be far too eco-conscious to do this sort of thing. So savour the craziness with Chesshyre while it lasts.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book and it inspired to me to want to visit several places in the book. Although some of the routes are no longer in operation, Tom Chesshyre makes you think about visiting forgotten places in Europe. His style is engaging and witty. I found the book well-written and I swiftly finished it. I would recommend this book for those looking for something light but inspiring. Get out there and explore Europe!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback