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How Ireland Really Went Bust
 
 

How Ireland Really Went Bust [Kindle Edition]

Matt Cooper
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Review

Superbly readable and insightful ... a must-have (Irish Mail on Sunday on Who Really Runs Ireland? )

Highly accessible and akin to a good thriller ... fascinating ... compelling' (Sunday Tribune on Who Really Runs Ireland? )

Hugely entertaining as well as instructive (Irish Independent on Who Really Runs Ireland? )

Impressive and eminently readable (Irish Times on Who Really Runs Ireland? )

Product Description

From the night when the Irish government guaranteed the debts of Irish banks in September 2008, to November 2010 when heavy hitters from the IMF and the ECB arrived in government buildings , Ireland was on a one-way road to ruin.



In How Ireland Really Went Bust Matt Cooper, journalist, broadcaster and No 1 bestselling author of Who Really Runs Ireland?, describes the tumultuous events of that period and he assesses the fall-out and what it means for Ireland's future.



Drilling deep into the economic collapse and the unprecedented political upheaval that characterised the time after the bank bailout and led to a game-changing general election, Cooper gets to the heart of what really happened. He investigates the background of the key decisions and reveals why they were taken, and by whom, to throw new light on a period that has changed Ireland forever.



Finally, Cooper sees signs that all is not lost - though we may have sunk to our lowest ebb as an economic entity, he sees glimmers of promise in a new breed of business leaders and political activists who see this as a time when Ireland can change for the better.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 720 KB
  • Print Length: 468 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1844881687
  • Publisher: Penguin (13 Oct 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005HHSXUK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #319,482 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Uncritical in any meangingful fashion 14 Jun 2012
Format:Paperback
Matt Coopers take on the crisis as a narrative of events is useful enough, but as you'd expect from one of Ireland's top journalists it's entirely uncritical in any meaningful fashion. One of the final chapters 'taking the pain' is an unthoughtful account of why the only possible solution to the crisis is cuts in working class pay and services, in effect the redistribution of wealth from working class people to pay off the debts of the financial elite. This conclusion is interesting in that even after tracing in great detail the entire banking and property collapse he still can't see beyond the very narrow political and economic blinders in Irish journalism. For journalists such as Cooper markets (even in failure) are not to be questioned but represent the only possible reality. He has nothing to say about even minor reforms. He certainly has nothing to say on neo-liberal economics, power or ideology, nor on the fact that private markets may not be the best way to supply essential needs such as housing, education or health.
However as a narrative record of what happened and when, it is a useful account.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Celtic Tiger collapse did not happen by chance. 23 Aug 2013
Format:Paperback
The fattening up of the Celtic Tiger and its subsequent demise was no accident.It was driven by a greedy and under-regulated entrepreneurial elite who were well served by a compliant government. Cooper tells their story well.

But his account lacks balance. The Celtic Tiger years did end emigration and brought many home from abroad. There was full employment and the welfare state expanded though real reform in education and the health service was not addressed. A number of important infrastructural improvements took place. Many, but not all, never had it so good with the trade union movement playing a major role in ensuring that working people had at least some share of this new wealth.

The collapse of the Celtic Tiger was not some aberration as Cooper seems to argue. It was intrinsic to its philosophy and success. The market was king, queen and ultimately knave. The greed driven, buccaneering approach to doing business and regulation which was facilitated by government was at the very heart of the Celtic Tiger.

There is no prosperous free market equilibrium. Boom and bust are part of the system. Only good governance and government on based on the principle of promoting the common good offers a credible alternative.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Uncritical in any meangingful fashion 14 Jun 2012
By peter neil - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Matt Coopers take on the crisis as a narrative of events is useful enough, but as you'd expect from one of Ireland's top journalists it's entirely uncritical in any meaningful fashion. One of the final chapters 'taking the pain' is an unthoughtful account of why the only possible solution to the crisis is cuts in working class pay and services, in effect the redistribution of wealth from working class people to pay off the debts of the financial elite. This conclusion is interesting in that even after tracing in great detail the entire banking and property collapse he still can't see beyond the very narrow political and economic blinders in Irish journalism. For journalists such as Cooper markets (even in failure) are not to be questioned but represent the only possible reality. He has nothing to say about even minor reforms. He certainly has nothing to say on neo-liberal economics, power or ideology, nor on the fact that private markets may not be the best way to supply essential needs such as housing, education or health.
However as a narrative record of what happened and when, it is a useful account.
5.0 out of 5 stars How Ireland really went bust 25 Sep 2012
By Tim - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
the book is an excellent account of what happened to Ireland in recent years. both from the perspective of politics and economics. I found that it wasn't to biased. great read, even for people who may not be to aware of Irsh politics or econmics
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