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How to Beat 1 d4 Paperback – 23 Sep 2005

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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Gambit Publications Ltd (23 Sept. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904600336
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904600336
  • Product Dimensions: 24.9 x 17.4 x 1.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,374,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Synopsis

Presents a reliable repertoire for Black against one of White's principal ways to open the game Aimed at club, tournament, internet and correspondence players From the author of the feted Understanding Your Chess The Queen's Gambit Accepted (QGA) is a popular opening amongst players at all levels as it gives Black free development and counter-punching potential, especially if White rises to the challenge. The QGA's soundness is demonstrated by the number of top-class grandmasters who have used it in critical games - it was key factor in Short's victory over Karpov, and has even been used by Kasparov at world-play level. Rizzitano recommends reliable main lines of the QGA, and throughout emphasizes how Black can create winning chances and White's typical ways to go wrong.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "julian20051001" on 2 Oct. 2005
Format: Paperback
'How To Beat 1 d4' is a world-class opening repertoire book! The opening coverage is divided into two sections: Part 1 (roughly two-thirds of the book) features the Queen's Gambit Accepted and Part 2 (roughly one-third of the book) features Queen's Pawn Games (White plays without c4). These openings include the Hodgson Attack (1 d4 d5 2 Bg5), Veresov Opening (1 d5 d5 2 Nc3), London System (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Bf4), King's Fianchetto (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 g3), Torre Attack (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Bg5), Colle System (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 e3), Stonewall Attack (1 d4 d5 2 e3 Nf6 3 Bd3 c5 4 c3 Nc6 5 f4), and the always-controversial Blackmar-Diemer Gambit (1 d4 d5 2 e4 dxe4 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 f3) - I should point out that this opening absorbs a tremendous beating from Rizzitano's analysis and will send its fans scurrying back to the drawing board.
'How to Beat 1 d4' offers the first comprehensive, authoritative coverage of several of these Queen's Pawn Games by a well-respected titled player - James Rizzitano earned the World Chess Federation International Master title back in the early 1980's. The idea is somewhat similar to an earlier Gambit offering for King's Pawn players - John Emms' excellent 'Play the Open Games as Black'. The difference is that here Rizzitano also covers the Queen's Gambit Accepted as Black versus 1 d4 - Emms' book was directed toward White's attempts to avoid the Ruy Lopez (1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5). The layout of the book is excellent - Gambit has gone with the larger book format and included plentiful diagrams - I think this trend was begun with the earlier Gambit book 'The English Attack' by Tapani Sammalvuo.
Rizzitano is an excellent writer; his earlier Gambit book 'Understanding Your Chess' is very highly-regarded.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Scp on 18 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am finding this book very useful. The author presents the analysis well, not just saying Black wins in every case, as some opening books. So you can trust the analysis. I find the second half - other then 2.c4 useful. There are a few lines where the database I use ( Chessbase light ) would suggest some alternatives to the text may be preferable, but I would think this probably inevitable. Definitely recommended if you are taking up the QGA.

One comment I have, which is not aimed soley at this book. When a book is written for Black , why are all the diagrams shown from the white side ? Might be convention, but it irritates me a little.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mauro Marchisotti on 26 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
I'm an ICCF Master Class player and I recently bought Rizzitano's book "How to beat 1.d4". I ever had problem with black vs 1.d4 and I read with great interest Rizzitano's book. The book was clear, extremely interesting, up to date, with all strategic ideas behind the opening well analysed and explained.
I recently tried the QGA in an ICCF Master Class tournament (EM-M-307) and the result was : +2 =0 -0 that is 100% for the first 2 QGA I ever played!!!!
Compliments to the author: the good result I get in the tournament is fully due to his book!!!
Dr.Mauro Marchisotti, Torino, Italy
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
World-Class Opening Repertoire Book! 10 Nov. 2005
A Kid's Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
'How To Beat 1 d4' is a world-class opening repertoire book! The opening coverage is divided into two sections: Part 1 (roughly two-thirds of the book) features the Queen's Gambit Accepted and Part 2 (roughly one-third of the book) features Queen's Pawn Games (White plays without c4). These openings include the Hodgson Attack (1 d4 d5 2 Bg5), Veresov Opening (1 d5 d5 2 Nc3), London System (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Bf4), King's Fianchetto (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 g3), Torre Attack (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Bg5), Colle System (1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 e3), Stonewall Attack (1 d4 d5 2 e3 Nf6 3 Bd3 c5 4 c3 Nc6 5 f4), and the always-controversial Blackmar-Diemer Gambit (1 d4 d5 2 e4 dxe4 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 f3) - I should point out that this opening absorbs a tremendous beating from Rizzitano's analysis and will send its fans scurrying back to the drawing board.

'How to Beat 1 d4' offers the first comprehensive, authoritative coverage of several of these Queen's Pawn Games by a well-respected titled player - James Rizzitano earned the World Chess Federation International Master title back in the early 1980's. The idea is somewhat similar to an earlier Gambit offering for King's Pawn players - John Emms' excellent 'Play the Open Games as Black'. The difference is that here Rizzitano also covers the Queen's Gambit Accepted as Black versus 1 d4 - Emms' book was directed toward White's attempts to avoid the Ruy Lopez (1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5). The layout of the book is excellent - Gambit has gone with the larger book format and included plentiful diagrams - I think this trend was begun with the earlier Gambit book 'The English Attack' by Tapani Sammalvuo.

Rizzitano is an excellent writer; his earlier Gambit book 'Understanding Your Chess' is very highly-regarded. After reading a few pages of this book it was apparent that this guy is all business - the bibliography is among the most comprehensive I have ever seen in an opening book, and there is also a complete Index of Variations at the end of the book to make it easy to locate a specific line. Rizzitano is not afraid to take on anybody and he backs up his evaluations with variations and good explanations. I also like the fact that he appears to go out of his way to give credit to earlier opening book authors for their ideas. Another nice feature is that there are a lot of correspondence games quoted in this book - this is a big weakness in many other opening books, so it is nice to see that Rizzitano used one of the major electronic correspondence chess databases as one of his game sources.

I think this is one of the best opening books of the young 21st century and I am looking forward to more books by this author. Congratulations to James Rizzitano and Gambit Publications on another excellent book!
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
An Exemplar of Chess Opening Books 25 Mar. 2006
By T. Bronzin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Rizzitano's "How to Beat 1 d4" is an example of how opening repetoire books should be written. The reader can tell how meticulously the author approached this work- all the relevant analysis, along with many suggested improvements from the author himself. The book presents the Queen's Gambit Accepted as the centerpiece of the repetoire, and also offers lines against all of White's second-move alternatives. A welcome bonus is analysis of 3 e3 e5 in the QGA, which allows Black to play alternatives such as 4...Bg4 in the main line after 3 Nf3 Nf6 4 e3. A great work.
25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Won my first two QGA games after reading this book 26 Mar. 2006
By Mauro Marchisotti - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'm an ICCF Master Class player and I recently bought Rizzitano's book "How to beat 1.d4". I ever had problem with black vs 1.d4 and I read with great interest Rizzitano's book. The book was clear, extremely interesting, up to date, with all strategic ideas behind the opening well analysed and explained.

I recently tried the QGA in an ICCF Master Class tournament (EM-M-307) and the result was : +2 =0 -0 that is 100% for the first 2 QGA I ever played!!!!

Compliments to the author: the good result I get in the tournament is fully due to his book!!!

Dr.Mauro Marchisotti, Torino, Italy
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Great Book 10 May 2007
By Alex Steger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an amazing book, extremely detailed and thorough. It is a totally complete repertoire against 1.d4. I don't know what the last reviewer is talking about. Contrarily, this one of the most complete and thorough opening repertoire books I've ever seen.

This is your road map when white plays 1.d4. Keep in mind that it's a repertoire book, not an instructional manual on how to play every single move in every single position. (But it comes close!) One thing the book lacks is an "Illustrative Games" section. If this is your only reference, then you will need to either find a supplemental book, well annotated QGA games, or a coach to help you work through the positions once the analysis stops.

The good news is that he basically quotes his sources on every book, game fragment, and annotator. If you want to see more, just pull the game up on your computer and have at it. This is a window into a titled player's opening preparation, so be prepared to do some work to digest the material.

I think this is good for players rated 1800+, because it can be an overwhelming amount of material at some points. It is definitely *not* the "Easy Guide" to the QGA.

I am looking forward to seeing more from the meticulously thorough Rizzitano.
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
An average repertoire book 4 Jun. 2007
By Chess amateur - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is divided into three parts. Part 1 consists of queen gambit accepted lines which not include the classical variation, part 2 handles the classical variation and part 3 handles openings where white do not follow up with c4 (Colle, London, Veresov, etc.)

Rizzitano handles the 3 parts very differently. While the classical variation is very deeply explained (as for 2300 players), Rizzitano handles for instance the Torre Attack more lightly (as for 1700 players).

So this book is not for ordinary club players. In many positions where white has more than just one alternative, Rizzitano often just describe just one alternative. The other alternatives may be less attractive, but for an ordinary club player who plays black, it is not easy to understand why. This book is full of variations and variations. Rizzitano surely knows how to use a chess database. But I miss some informative text, and not just variations after words like: Alternatives:, then:, now:, White has some alternatives here:, Let's examine: When someone write "Let's examine" I want some explanation text, not just variations. I believe it may be difficult for a normal chess player to benefit 100% from this book, without doing his one opening description from this book.

So I will not recommend this book for players rated below 2000.

What I also miss in this book is a more specific description of strategically ideas about each variant and some complete games showing when these strategically ideas are successful.
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