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Housing in Urban Britain, 1780-1914: Class, Capitalism and Construction (Studies in Economic & Social History) Paperback – 26 Jan 1989


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Product details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; First Edition edition (26 Jan. 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333387082
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333387085
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 13.8 x 0.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,786,335 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

"...Rodger's study is an excellent introduction to the social, economic, and political issues related to urban housing. Students at the undergraduate and graduate level will benefit from reading this introduction and then using both the notes and the updated bibliographical essay for further study." Vladimir Steffel, Historian --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description

The history of housing encapsulates many problems associated with the transition from a rural to an overwhelmingly urban nation. This book is the ideal introduction to a central issue in nineteenth-century history, reviewing the recent arguments and offering a guide to further reading. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Artsreadings on 1 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is written by one of the national specialists in urban history and urban development. It is richly documented and well written.

It is very much a text book on the subject matter.

1. Introduction: an urban framework

2. Urban expansion and the pattern of demand
(i) Population, migration and the cities
(ii) Wages, emloyment and the structure of demand

3. Supply influences
(i) Landownership, estate development and housing
(ii) The building industry
(iii) The containing context: building regulations

4. House types: terraces and tenements
(i) Residential segregation and mobility
(ii) Evolution of the terraced house
(iii) The housing hierarchy

5. The suburbs: villas and values

6. The containment of "the housing problem" 1850-1880

7. A late-Victorian and Ewardian housing crisis
(i) Market intervention
(ii) Property politics: tension and crisis 1880-1914

8. Comfort and housing amenity
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Useful Text 20 July 2009
By David Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is really written for the professional historian, not the casual reader, but as a research document, it is quite good. Surveying the general state of housing in the United Kingdom with a primary focus on poor and middle-class dwellings, the book is complete and thorough, despite its relative brevity. If you want a handle on what terrace housing was like, and the conditions of the poor throughout the late Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian eras, the text will be useful to you.
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