Trade in your item
Get a £3.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

House Corrino (Prelude to Dune) Hardcover – 6 Sep 2001


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£112.93 £16.80

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.


Trade In this Item for up to £3.25
Trade in House Corrino (Prelude to Dune) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £3.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton; First Printing edition (6 Sept. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0340751797
  • ISBN-13: 978-0340751794
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 23.8 x 5.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 716,474 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Just simple story-telling done to perfection (Coventry Evening Telegraph)

House Atreides is a terrific prequel, but it's also a first-rate adventure on its own. Frank Herbert would surely be delighted and proud of this continuation of his vision. (Dean Koontz on House Atreides)

The authors have constructed a clever tale, with adequate amounts of conflict, drama and intrigue to ensure it is a compelling addition to this established trilogy (Belfast Newsletter on HOUSE CORRINO)

A clever tale with adequate amounts of conflict, drama and intrigue to ensure it is a compelling addition to this established trilogy (South London Press)

a very welcome return to a fascinating universe (Barry Forshaw Scifi website.)

Those who long to return to the world of desert, spice and sandworms will be amply satisfied. (The Times on House Atreides)

Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson succeed in weaving their own intricate saga. Dune: House Atreides does its predecessors justice. (USA Today on House Atreides)

Succeeds admirably (The New York Times Book review on House Harkonnen)

A must read for all followers of this series,and one that is worthy of reading on its own merit. (taxi globe)

House Harkonnen is compulsive reading. I certainly enjoyed meeting pardot Kynes and Liet, learning more about the Freman, as well as Gurney Halleck, Duncan Idaho and the Lady Jessica. Such vile villains...and such a fascinating description of splendid places. (Anne McCaffrey on House Harkonnen)

Book Description

The third and final volume of Prelude to Dune brings this gripping series to its close, only a few years before the beginning of Frank Herbert's classic science fiction novel Dune.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Sept. 2001
Format: Paperback
Of course, we were sceptical about the merits of Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson in taking on the mantle of Frank Herbert, but we needn't have been.
I didn't think the the last two prequels were absolute classics, but they were extremely entertaining to read. This one is the best out of the bunch, and the one I felt I had to give 5 stars. Not only in commendation of the excellent work both autors put in, but I honestly thought I was reading a book by Frank at some points.
The books feel like one long story, and in a way, they are. But this one was the most action packed and the most un-put downable (is that a word?). The set pieces involving Ajidica are fantastic, and you just know that they are setting the scene for the long-awaited 'Chapterhouse: Dune' follow-up, 'Dune 7'. Even though it is set 5,000 years before the events in that book, you get an idea of just where Frank Herbert was heading. Don't forget, these guys actually found Frank's notes for 'Dune 7' and said they adjusted the story accordingly. Look for the clues, they are there.
The story simply thunders along. For a long portion in the middle, you simply cannot stop reading; the Heighliner accidents and struggle for Ix are great sci-fi. In fact, and this must sound funny in a way, when the parts on Dune itself kept cropping up, they didn't match the imagination of the authors' vision elsewhere. I found this quite refreshing after so many Herbert books set on the dusty planet.
The finale is great, if (obviously) a tad predictable. But the way you GET there is the great high point of this book; even a few surprises and twists crop up. Although he had a bit-part in Dune, the part of Count Fenring has been fleshed out to produce one of the best characters in the whole series.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Jan. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I had a hard time getting through "House Corrino," Book 3 of the "Dune: House Trilogy" by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. On the one hand, the brevity of most of the sections was nice, because I could easily read a section or two or any and all opportunities. But, more importantly, the book has an inherent problem in that the sense of suspense is extremely limited. Is Emperor Shaddam IV going to succeed in his secret program to create a synthetic substitute for melange? No. Will someone succeed in stopping the Lady Jessica from bearing a son for her beloved Duke Leto? No. Is Gurney Halleck going to be stuck forever on a lost highliner? No. The reason I know all these answers is not because I am giving away spoilers to the book but because we know all the answers from having read Frank Hebert's original epic novel "Dune." So the surprises here are few and minor, and there is no real sense of suspense. This may be a problem inherent to most prequels, as George Lucas is certainly proving over and over again on the big screen.
Towards the end, as the various scenarios played out to their conclusions, things did got a bit more interesting. This was where Herbert and Anderson were able to fill in some gaps in the "Dune" backstory; my favorite would probably be the whole bit with the Bene Gesserit breeding program for producing the Kwisatz Haderach and the continuing ecological plan of Leit-Kynes for Arakkis (although less so with the latter than in previous volumes). I was even rethinking the rating I was planning on giving this book, but then Duke Leto announced the middle name for his son Paul and I went directly to my "Give me a break" mantra: how do you think the Lady Jessica would feel about Paul having that middle name?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 April 2002
Format: Paperback
...Review by Matthew Hughes, Sandbach, Cheshire (UK)
This trilogy acts as a prequel to the classic Sci-Fi saga written by Frank Herbert (Brian Herbert's late father).
So what's the verdict? Is this trilogy merely a money-spinning potboiler, designed to fleece the devotees of Herbert senior's amazing invention, or does it have merit in it's own right?
Well - simply - yes it DOES have a great deal of intrinsic worth, and there's certainly a lot more life in the Dune universe yet!
Frank Herbert completed 6 Dune novels before his untimely death in 1986: 'Dune', 'Dune Messiah', 'Children of Dune', 'God Emperor of Dune', 'Heretics of Dune', and 'Chapter House: Dune'. That saga (as anyone who has read them will know) was left incomplete. 'Heretics..' and 'Chapter House..' were the first two parts of a trilogy that was meant to be completed by a book that was, at the time of Herbert's death, still only tentatively titled 'Dune 7'. This book would have answered the question of what it was the terrifying 'Honoured Matres' were running from, and would have revealed the true relationship between the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood and the Matres.
Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson discovered the preliminary notes, not only for 'Dune 7', but also for a proposed 'prequel' trilogy that would have chronicled events surrounding the Butlerian Jihad - the war of Humankind against the machines that took place thousands of years before the first 'Dune' book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback