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24 Hour Party People

4.1 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Andy Serkis, Steve Coogan, Paddy Considine, Shirley Henderson, John Thomson
  • Directors: Michael Winterbottom
  • Format: PAL, Widescreen, Colour
  • Language: Italian, English
  • Subtitles: Italian
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Officine UBU
  • Run Time: 114.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0041KX39K
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 509,524 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Manchester 1976. Il presentatore televisivo Tony Wilson è a un concerto dei Sex Pistols. Ispirato da questo momento cruciale nella storia della musica, decide insieme ai suoi amici, di fondare un'etichetta discografica, la Factory Records.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The story of Factory Records & the Hacienda is a long and complex one, full of urban myths and legends, humour, tragedy and some of the best music ever made.
Inevitably, the film struggles to contain its vast subject matter and was apparently edited down from 3 hours. In the end, Michael Winterbottom has made a film which reflects the myth and the truth of Factory in equal measures. The film leaps wildly from hyper-realism (The Hacienda interior is re-created down to the last brick, even inviting back the original punters to re-create the atmosphere for one last time) to pure fantasy (Happy Mondays trip to Barbados is re-created as a scene from Robinson Crusoe).
The film features so many enigmatic characters, and several who deserve a bio-pic of their own. Shaun Ryder and the late Rob Gretton, Ian Curtis and Martin Hannett.
To narrow the scope, the film is “seen” through the eyes of Tony Wilson, although on the DVD commentary, Wilson points out that he has fought tooth and nail to have some scenes left out which he insists are entirely untrue. Bizarrely, Wilson still holds down a job as a respected newsreader on Granada TV despite the film depicting him romping with prostitutes and taking copious amounts of drugs. The film itself makes some playful contrasts between Wilson’s life as TV presenter, and that as director of a chaotic, anarchic record label and nightclub. We cut from Wilson living it up on the tour bus with Happy Mondays, to Wilson conducting a banal interview with a pensioner for local TV news.
Like Factory, the film is messy, inconsistent and bloody-minded. But like Factory, it looks great and the music is good. Coogan is great, if a little Partridge-esque as Wilson.
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Format: DVD
This tells the story of Factory records, the record label started in the late 1970's by the enterprising Tony Wilson, whose death has recently reverberated through the music business. In this film, Tony is played by Steve Coogan, who manages to capture some of Wilson's Cambridge arrogance, yet also much of his childlike enthusiasm for music and less than perfect money-management skills.

Wanting to put Manchester on the musical map seemed to be Tony Wilson's main motivation right from the off, and shortly after the formation of factory records, signing various bands. Some of them aren't so well recognised today, such as 'A Certain Ratio', but some of them, such as 'Joy Division', went on to become one of the most influential bands of the post-punk era. A lot of this was down to the eccentric producer Martin Hannett, who worked in such a fearlessly authentic way that Joy Division's debut 'Unknown Pleasures', went on to become one of the most unique, distinctive and authentic records of all time. Which is just as well considering how difficult to please Hannett was - even going so far as to make Joy Division drummer Stephen Morris do his drumming on the roof.

The premise of Factory Records was simple: it was all about art, rather than profits. In this sense, Tony Wilson was a spectacularly inept businessman, but his commitment to music, nurturing new talent, and focusing on artistic output was unwavering.

After the tragic suicide of Ian Curtis in 1980, Wilson's next venture was 'The Hacienda', an ultra-modern nightclub in which Wilson got a whole host of musical acts from all corner of the music business to perform. These included The Smiths, Happy Mondays and various others.
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Format: DVD
24 Hour Party People is directed by Michael Winterbottom and written by Frank Cottrell Boyce. It stars Steve Coogan, Paddy Considine, Shirley Henderson and Andy Serkis.

Film charts the rise and fall of Tony Wilson's (Coogan) impact on the Manchester music scene from 1976-1992. Musically it encompasses the Punk Rock explosion, Post Punk, Madchester, the birth of Factory Records and The Haçienda Nightclub. Main bands featured as narrative threads are Joy Division and The Happy Mondays.

Print the legend.

There's nothing like it, in music based movies that is, 24 Hour Party People is a collage of styles and genres, part biography, part comedy drama, part rock mockumentary, part tragedy and part fantasy, with the latter a little galling to those in the know since the film often plays fast and loose with the truth. But this almost chaotic approach by Winterbottom is perfect for this most important and influential era of music. There is a bustling energy throughout the picture, a chic coolness coming out of the hand held digital camera, the music is excellence unbound, while it more often than not is great fun, even as dark passages flit in and out-making thumping emotional beats-there's a causticism involved. Wilson was a colourful impresario, and well worth the time afforded him here. The performances vary from good to great, with Coogan at the centre a pure delight as he not only acts out the part of Wilson, but also narrates and breaks the fourth wall to ensure viewers are in the know about the players and situations. While it's fun to play spot the cameo star as well.

Martin Hannett: Too Big For Death.
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