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Hornsey 1968: The Art School Revolution Paperback – 22 May 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Frances Lincoln; illustrated edition edition (22 May 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0711228744
  • ISBN-13: 978-0711228740
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 682,442 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A fascinating read for any lover of art. (Angel)

Tickner has succeeded in her aim of furnishing a 'rigorous and useable' account of the event, its prehistory and fallout, providing a valuable and dependable resource fior anyone specially interested in the period, and/or in the politics of art education. (Art Monthly)

This is a serious study of a subject that undoubtedly shook up the system and deserves its own niche in education's on-going story. (Camden New Journal)

A lucid, vivid and sympathetic account of what happened at Hornsey…Tickner brings her formidable research skills to bear on the subject and makes full use of unpublished archives and interviews. (Art Book)

Whilst much has been written on the subject, the book draws on personal experience in a wise and thoughtful way, bringing together much archive material, previously unpublished, to construct a fascinating account of an art school student occupation that was planned to last for 24 hours, but extended into six weeks. This book is a fascinating read and is highly recommended. (International Journal of Art & Design Education)

Undoubtedly, Tickner's book, with its detailed informative endnotes and bibliography, provides a much needed addition to available resources with the benefit of hindsight and with the detached perspective which a highly respected historian can bring to the material - albeit with the post modern problematics of any claim to a single authoritative voice, which Tickner fully acknowledges. (The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture)

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In Tom Stoppard's Rock 'n' Roll, Max complains that the impetus for political change in the 1960s was wasted on sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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I knew Lisa and this situation. Her analysis of the Revolution is excellent.
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By SarahReedMHR on 6 Oct 2014
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As an ex-student at Hornsey during the sit-in I found it a gripping account
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Art Design on 11 May 2014
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Sorry for the late review. This book is as good as I expected. And it's very convenient to buy stuff on Amazon. Thank you.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Scholarly-oriented account of student uprising 5 Dec 2008
By G. Steirer - Published on Amazon.com
If you're a general reader with an interest in art education or the student uprisings of 1968, this small book (102 pages, ignoring the endnotes) will provide a basic history. But you'll likely find it dull. Tickner is historically thorough but piles too many details into too loose a narrative for it to hold your attention. Much better is David Caute's _The Year of the Barricades_.

If you're a scholar or graduate student, however, you'll likely find the same flood of details useful. The book's sources are largely primary or quasi-primary texts: books, pamphlets, and articles from the late 60s and 70s (many of which are extremely hard to find in America). Secondary sources are mostly ignored - you'll find no reference to the copious 1968 scholarship of the last 20 years, little comparison to other student revolts, and few reference to theorists of ideological or cultural change. But this lacuna is to the book's credit: by sticking to primary sources, Tickner avoids covering the same ground that other 1968 historians tread and re-tread; even better, she stays out of the distracting ideological debate that makes up most work of this kind.

So why not 5 stars? The format of the book is quite strange. The endnotes occupy 100 pages and are printed in a 10 pt font (versus the 100 page, 12 pt, one-and-a-half spaced font of the main text). They're dense, difficult to read, and require constant flipping around: back to the main text for their context and forward to the (oddly cramped) bibliography for information about the sources. It's a bizarre way for a scholar to present her research. Other scholars will find it frustrating to work with.
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