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Hood: Number 1 in series (King Raven Trilogy) Paperback – 5 Jul 2007

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Frequently Bought Together

Hood: Number 1 in series (King Raven Trilogy) + Scarlet: Number 2 in series (King Raven Trilogy) + Tuck: Number 3 in series (King Raven Trilogy)
Price For All Three: £26.97

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Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Atom; New Ed edition (5 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904233716
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904233718
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 2.9 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 392,372 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

An entertaining and evocative addition to the mythology surrounding the outlaw. (Lincolnshire Echo)

A book no fan of historical fiction and fantasy will want to miss. (Newmarket Journal)

Book Description

Stephen Lawhead's first novel for younger readers is an extraordinary retelling of the Robin Hood legend.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Derob Ecnirp on 25 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
A very fine read, Rhi Bran (Robin) is a prince, unfortunately he has his lands stolen by Normans, under whom his people suffer. Rhi Bran flees his land to try and get help from the King, he is turned down and once again runs. He attacks Normans he finds ransacking a house, he is wounded and almost dies...

Read the book to find out the rest :P Don't want to ruin it for you. I enjoyed this book immensely, I noticed that other customers have complained about it not being Robin Hood, personally I prefer this new story line and location. One of the things I found very interesting reading this book is the way Stephen R. Lawhead slowly moulds Rhi Bran into the shape of the old Robin Hood, Rhi Bran begins hardly recognisable to Robin, but slowly, as the story unfolds, he becomes more and more like Robin.

Overall a Very good read and well worth the money, I'm currently reading the next book, Scarlet, which is also a very good read but a very diffrent style and, for me, a four star.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By J. Turner VINE VOICE on 3 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback
Firstly, I have to say that I've long loved Stephen Lawheads books, and I have no problem with Robin Hood being set in Wales - I am surprised it hasn't been done before given 'Hood's' association with the longbow... the stroy begins with a good bit of action... 'great!' I thought... but alas, my expectations of a ripping adventure was not to be... for one thing, the research into welsh myth is sloppy - although the best sequence was the forest wife Angharad telling Bran the story of the King Raven - Lawhead at his poetic best - one section had a salmon chasing an otter, when it's the other way around! It could only have been written by a townie... my other big criticism - all the characters seem to come from the 'writer's big book of stereotypes' - the Normans are brutal, their noble wives are childlike and sickly...so how come they didn't all die out then? I am surprised that Lawhead wrote such a substandard novel when he is capable of so much better... I was disapointed and can't see the point of buying the other books in the series. Overall, the premise was great, but it soon congealed into a sloppy mess and frankly, left me wondering if Mr Lawhead had been ill?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gary Selikow on 16 Feb. 2015
Format: Paperback
I have been a great fan of the Robin Hood legend since I was seven.
Stephen Lawhead breathes new life into the legend with this historical thriller which had me hooked from the start and which I finished in three
Robin Hood (Bran ap Brychan,) is Welsh ands not English and the main action takes place not in Sherwood Forest but the primeval Welsh greenwood. It is also set not during the reign of King John but a century earlier in the reign of William II (Rufus)
Bran , Prince of the Welsh kingdom of Elfael , is turned into a fugitive after his father, the king, is killed and his land seized by the Norman French invaders
His efforts to secure his kingdom are cruelly rebuffed, and Elfael's people are enslaved by the evil Count De Braose, Bran, together with Iwan and a Saxon monk, build a settlement of destitute Welsh refugees, and harry the French commerce in Elfael
Marion is Merian, a stunningly beautiful and intelligent Welsh princess, and is there as Bran's young lover from the beginning. mong Bran's retinue is an ancient sorceress and healer who nurses Bran back to helath when he is wounded and fleeing the French.
Lawhead uses his brilliant penmanship to craft a thrilling, well grounded and smooth flowing story, while keeping the sence of Robin Hood, as the champion of the poor and arch enemy of the Norman elites. robin Hood as the Welsh patriot Bran still retains the sence of what Robin Hood stands for
At one stage on the way to London to petition his case he even humiliates two Norman knights who are harassing two little English girls, and rescues the children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BlackBrigand TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 29 April 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
THE KING RAVEN TRILOGY - HOOD - SCARLET - TUCK

I have been for many years a collector of books and films connected to the Robin Hood legends and so it inevitable that I would eventually read this series although I must admit that I was not particularly fond of Mr. Lawheads previous medieval period novels and the books remained fairly low down my reading list for some time. I was mistaken...this trilogy of novels by Stephen Lawhead is, in my opinion, by far the best of this authors work to date.
The series transposes the idea of the Robin Hood legend into post-Norman Conquest Welsh marches, with the principal characters of Robin, Will Scarlet, Marion, and Friar Tuck,becoming Welsh freedom fighters seeking to purge the marches of the Norman invaders. Certainly not another retelling of the usual Robin Hood legends and tales and featuring none of the traditional stories, these novels have a charm of their own, the writing is easy flowing and the characters pausible, particularly because of their flaws and character failures. The tale is not one of the 'good' forest bandits versus the 'bad' Norman rulers but has a human depth where all of the participants are depicted as sometimes noble and sometimes less so, each somewhat obsessive with their own view of their personal ambitions.
The story line is sound and could have stood alone without the need to borrow the Robin Hood tag...as it is only the character names that have been merged into the story, perhaps this was not Mr Lawheads original intent but an idea from his editor to add marketing value to the trilogy. Never-the-less well worth reading if you are interested in feudal era historical novels particularly as the Marcher wars of the 12th century have been much overlooked in fiction.
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