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Honest to God - 50th anniversary edition Paperback – Special Edition, 4 Sep 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 130 pages
  • Publisher: SCM Press; 50th Anniversary edition edition (4 Sept. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0334047331
  • ISBN-13: 978-0334047339
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.4 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 323,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Honest to God not only got people talking about their beliefs, it helped a whole generation relocate and rediscover God in some of their deepest experiences. Whatever theological reservations there might be about its theological framework, it proved hugely pastorally helpful-and could do so again today. --Richard Holloway

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. P. Jay on 22 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
I first read this book as a teenager when it was serialised in The Sunday Mirror. I was aged twelve and that was the only Sunday paper we had in my family. Can you imagine a national newspaper doing that today? How things have moved on. Apart from little articles by the likes of Giles Fraser in The Guardian, there is little serious discussion in the media, merely soundbites. Working class people are still able to read thought-provoking stuff if it is in everyday language it's been my lifelong career to introduce their children to it ass a schoolmaster) but today's press short-changes and patronises them.

It was written in the momentous year of 1963, the year which also saw John F. Kennedy was assassinated, The Beatles released their first record, the Profumo scandal, the `I have a dream' speech, Pope John 23rd died and the great train robbery

I encountered it again when it was a set text in my first year as an undergraduate in Philosophy of religion.

Just like S. Ignatius of Loyola was laid up in hospital with time for reflection, which led to his popular Spiritual Exercises, so Robinson was in hospital with time to catch up on his reading and to produce this book.

Although there is little that is original in this book, it did introduce us, in a popular way, to people that I and many others later went on to read: Tillich, Bultmann and Bonhoeffer. There were other writers, who Robinson didn't mention. There was the `Death of God theology' of the likes of Thomas Altizer. This was later taken up by Don Cupitt and in the later works of John (Jack) Spong and Richard Holloway.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. Holmes on 27 July 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm not religious, certainly not a Christian, but I'm always dumbfounded by the language atheists use to ridicule Christian beliefs, as above, especially on Cif as it happens.

This is a very thought provoking and interesting book. Didn't bring me ant closer to being spiritual, but it did reinforce my belief that religion has lost it's way in spreading the message.

Atheists arguments based on men on clouds etc, now sound dumber than ever.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cjbevan on 10 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
A more disingenuous title can hardly be imagined . So far, by page 46, God hardly seems to figure, him being so obsolete and all, and honesty only seems to mean that he admits to being bewildered by Christianity; yet he refuses to simply resign his job as bishop as an honest man would do. Anglicanism seems to consist for him as something without Christianity. Pictures of him, brow furrowed over his clerical collar, show that early-to-mid 20th century intellectual churchman; one of those who had not yet owned up to their theological bankruptcy. I started to read this book because of an article on the BBC website written by an apostate priest whose brother I once knew .

The most interesting aspect of the book (hence two stars not one) is Robinson's realisation of the gap between Christianity and European culture; the gap gleefully described by Stuart Murray as the end of Christendom . That gap is also described by Hans Rookmaaker in the context of art . Robinson correctly identifies the fallacy of the god of the gaps, but does not rise to the philosophical challenge of then understanding just who god is beyond the gaps. He can understand the god of superstition, but not the god of faith. He can see mythological function, but not mythological truth. In this he is an extraordinarily naïve and pedestrian thinker. For Robinson, the lack of consensus within European culture means that Christianity itself, Christ himself, must be lacking; he mistakes cultural perceptions for epistemological absolutes. For this liberal theologian, the fact that many do not believe means that the belief must be wrong, that a new belief must be found that is palatable to the many. This is the tail wagging the dog.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Donne on 31 July 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good to read again after 50 years.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful By john h. on 25 Oct. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
LACKED SUBSTANCE AND SCHOLARSHIP. EMPTY AND UNCONVINCING. The quality of writing was appalling and there was a total lack of logic.
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