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Home is Where We Start from: Essays by a Psychoanalyst Paperback – 29 Nov 1990


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Home is Where We Start from: Essays by a Psychoanalyst + The Child, the Family, and the Outside World (Penguin Psychology) + Playing and Reality (Routledge Classics)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New Ed edition (29 Nov 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140135634
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140135633
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 149,097 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

D.W. Winnicott (1896-1971) was the first paediatrician in Britain to train as a psychoanalyst. In over forty years of clinical practice at the Paddington Green Children's Hospital, he brought unprecedented skill to the relatively new discipline of the psychoanalysis of children. His work is increasingly being regarded as one of the most influential contributions to psychoanalysis since Freud. His wife, Clare, was a renowned social worker.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Lucinda Stern on 6 Mar 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is one of the essentials for those studying counselling and psychotherapy. It is best read after an introduction to Winnicott - I particularly like Adam Phillips's 'Winnicott' and Gomez's 'Object Relations' for this. The book is formed out of a series of lectures given by Winnicott.

Sadly it does not include such gems as 'Hate in the counter-transference', or parts of his work with 'the Piggle'. It does however contain work around the 'false self' and the initial formation of the infant ego, and the 'value of depression', and I found these chapters helpful in my studies and in my work.

I have only read the chapter immediately relevent to me. Whilst Winnicot writes well, I do find reading him slightly soporific. This book is best read with a pencil to hand to highlight the salient points.

As well as containing some of Winncott's psychoanalytical thought this volume also contains a section on society, which looks at, amonsgt other things feminism and democracy. The work also contains some of Winncotts' work on delinquency.
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By JJ Rose on 29 Jun 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great help, just what i needed to get started, had great results in exams
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By JOHNATHAN on 28 Sep 2014
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very good
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
88 of 89 people found the following review helpful
Papers of a great humane thinker 4 Aug 2000
By Eileen G. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
These essays were collected and published posthumously, by Winnicott's widow, Clare, and colleagues. British pediatrician, humanitarian, and ground-breaking psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott died in 1971, having made a nearly immeasurable contribution to the fields of psychoanalysis and child psychology. In this volume, as with his other writings, his ideas are deep, reverential and respectful, and often somewhat complex, and at the same time, his presentation is utterly simple and straightforward. The reader is fully engaged, as a result of Winnicott's incredible knack for connecting with his audience.
The lively and interesting papers comprising this utterly accessible collection were written over a wide span of time - three decades or more. The selections are varied, and have been separated for readerly convenience into several sections: "Health and Illness," "The Family," and, finally, "Reflections on Society." Some were written in order to be presented at meetings of the medical and/or psychoanalytic community; others, to various civic, political, and other groups (The Progressive League, The Liberal Magazine, The Borstal Assistant Governors' Conference, etc.)
The collection is various and interesting for its content but also for - not in spite of - its grab-bag feel. Winnicott was comfortable with his listeners, and never afraid to speak simply, clearly, and with his trademark empathy intact. In fact, that empathy was at the core of his work. There's a great variety in it, too. "The Price of Disregarding Psychoanalytic Research," a talk given in 1965, details the importance of his philosophy. ("The link between poetic truth and scientific truth is surely in the person, in you and me.") Essays such as the 1963 "The Value of Depression" ("Always, depression implies ego strength...") and the 1967 "Delinquency as a Sign of Hope" ("the antisocial tendency is linked inherently with deprivation" ) show Winnicott at his very best. And the playful and kind 1969 "The Pill and the Moon" - written for an address to the Progressive League in the 1960's - is wonderful.
Some of these hopeful and kindhearted essays show their age, but in a welcome and lovely way, and therefore each is well worth reading and thinking about.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Brilliant 17 Feb 2014
By Myles Ludwig - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A simple, yet superb compliment to psychodynamic therapy, and very helpful in understanding oneself. It is certainly an important work.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Winnicott is really good 4 Mar 2014
By john copeland - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are a group of psychoanalysts that I recommend: WInnicott: Fromm: Horney. This Psychoanalyst really stands out as readable with good ideas.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Good 15 Aug 2013
By sandra - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Need the book for college and got it cheaper than at the bookstore. Was also very quick at my house
3 of 28 people found the following review helpful
a bit on the strange side 4 Oct 2009
By vera - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i am not so sure that winnicott would have published the transcripts and texts included in the book - at least not in that form... probably a man with charisma, his lectures must have been very attractive but when you read the printed text, obviously unrevised - hmmm
and gee, i'm not a fan of feminists, but the allegations he makes on the poor women. it's funny at times but, let's face it, weather we like them or not, women can vote thanks to feminists...
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