Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  
Quantity:1
The Holy Bible has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item is in good working condition. The box or case may have some signs of previous use but is generally in nice shape. We will ship quickly, normally within 24 hours from our UK warehouse. Please email us with any queries either before or after purchase.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£4.29
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Add to Basket
£4.50
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: DVD Overstocks
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.69

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • The Holy Bible
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

The Holy Bible

108 customer reviews

Price: £4.26 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by best_value_entertainment and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
42 new from £2.85 21 used from £0.25
£4.26 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by best_value_entertainment and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Manic Street Preachers Store

Music

Image of album by Manic Street Preachers

Photos

Image of Manic Street Preachers

Videos

James Dean Bradfield on Postcards from a Young Man

Biography

“The secret of life is to have a task, something you devote your entire life to, something you bring everything to, every minute of the day for your whole life. And the most important thing is—it must be something you cannot possibly do.” (Henry Moore)

Most bands don’t get to their tenth album. Mercifully. By then, the youthful brio, the wit, the desire, ... Read more in Amazon's Manic Street Preachers Store

Visit Amazon's Manic Street Preachers Store
for 131 albums, 13 photos, videos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

The Holy Bible + Everything Must Go + Generation Terrorists
Price For All Three: £11.71

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (4 Nov. 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Epic
  • ASIN: B000024J5H
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  Mini-Disc  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (108 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,664 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.

Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

The Holy Bible is the sound of a band plunging into chaos, taking in such joyous subjects as the holocaust ("The Intense Humming Of Evil"), prostitution ("Yes"), anorexia ("4st 7lb") and general despair (everything else). Needless to say, the majority of it was written by guitarist Richey Edwards, just before he was hospitalised for depression. It's not the easiest album in the world to listen to, with James Bradfield often having to cram all the words together to fit them all in, but it's worth the perseverance. The dark, gothic (but never Goth) guitars compliment the black mood of "Yes" and the alternately narcissistic and disgusted "Faster" (which samples the film version of Orwell's masterpiece, 1984), while the gentle, acoustic "This Is Yesterday" often sounds close to breaking. Suffice to say, this is not a party record, but for pure, intelligent hatred, of the self and of others, it is fascinating, and still one of the Manics greatest moments. -- Emma Johnston

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Ms. K. Thavabalasingam on 30 Aug. 2007
Format: Audio CD
I was recommended this album by a friend with care and warning that the lyrics delve so deeply into the flaws and corruption of today's society that all the songs emotionally stay with you forever.
And my was he right.

First listen? I didn't really listen to the lyrics as such but more of how James managed to entwine the lyrics with the music so cleverly.
The more I listened to the album, the more I became intrigued by the lyrics. The most gruesome, heart-wrenching and honest lyrics I've ever heard. But they're so amazing.

So what I did was look deeply into what Richey James Edwards was all about. The more I learnt about him, the more I loved the songs and the more I realised what they all meant.

This is an album to be kept forever. It seriously is a compelling disc full of the many things people are too afraid to admit are happening in our society.

Once you listen to it, you will appreciate the music that the Manics make even more. Trust me. It's definitely worth the buy as it will keep you listening for years to come.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Jun. 2001
Format: Audio CD
Quite truly one of the marvels of British and Welsh music at the end of the twentieth century, The Holy Bible is both harrowing and addictive yet has placed the Manic Street Preachers in a awkward situation; never again would their music and lyrics fuse together into a cohesive fireball of nilhism, rage, and beauty.
The roots of this album start with the over-produced "Gold Against The Soul" and the backlash that befell the band that wanted to be bigger than Guns N' Roses. While the effort was more streamlined than the debut, the result was a Manic Street Preachers album that was too polished, very photogenic, and even polite enough to merge with MOR stadium rock in an effort to gain a larger audience. The acoustic trend in music was acknowledged with hefty doses of fingerpicked intros and hushed Hammond organs while grunge was highlighted with wah-wah pedals and stacatto riffs. They supported this album by playing with Bon Jovi.
Then, things started to happen. Richey Edwards continued his slide into self-hurt, depression, alcoholism, and drug abuse. Musical tastes were changing as bands jumped on the BritPop bandwagon. Pop music was on the way up as moody, introspective rock was on the way out. Their manager, Philip Hall, had passed away from cancer. Kurt Cobain committed suicide. All of these factors combined with an Manic Street Preachers habit of changing gears to keep their musical approach fresh. Hammonds and acoustics were stripped off the songs. Fuzz guitars and bass were added along with flanger and phase effects. The band that had a soundbite for each track on their debut album started defining each track with an opening excerpt from film, text, and music.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. A. Mcculloguh on 2 Jan. 2009
Format: Audio CD
Notoriously seen as some what of Richey's last will and testiment its very hard to say something about this album that hasn't already been said. It's a curious CD produced in the red light district of Cardiff and it shows, everything sounds jaggered and compressed from James vocal performance to the guitars which now holds a razor sharp snarl. The music itself is heavily produced and gothic, some would go as far as metal, but I wouldn't.

The lyrics themselves tend to be a mess of disconnected jargon usually in sharp contrast. Such as the ballad of anorexia 4st 12lbs.

Lose my only remaining home
See my third rib appear
A week later all my flesh disappear
Stretching taut, cling-film on bone
Im getting better

This is far from the name checking protest of Motorcycle emptyness, this is geniune horror in song form. Which is where my review really focuses, mainly against the 2 star reviews on this album. What does this album really say and do the Manic's have a right to say it?

Why people listen to depressing music is a curious question as music tends to focus far more on emulating emotion or influencing it than say a movie. The people out there who declare this album brilliant in its total hopelessness and despair are missing the point and perhaps crazy... This album screams compassion and humanity, not neccasarally in the music, or the lyrics but in the fact it was written by some damaged people at a point where they seemed incapable of making their mark on the world.

Despite the comparisons to Closer by Joy Division or In Utero by Nirvana theres little here to suggest the album should be looked at this way.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ernest on 19 April 2003
Format: Audio CD
Pretentious, political and at times poetic. Accumulating years of studying history and politics onto one disc, it's done so very well. It's gifted with a genuine detestation of political figures and glorifed serial killers which Richey/Nicky vent in their Archives of Pain. It's an education in itself, this album alone inspired hundreds of teenagers who realised that socialism is about more than being a miner from Wigan, to discover culture. Even if you depise the glamourous arrogance of the Manics, amongst the prosaic acerbity of their lyrics is a collections of songs blessed with the uniqueness of J-D Bradfield's vocals, stretched beyond what one would call 'jigsaw fitting' lyrics. It's difficult to express political opinion in sugar-coated melodies, this album is far from universal. It's ego requires tolerance; it's abrasiveness, patience. But it's expressive if not pacifying, its subject matter prevents any kinds of serene state. The album is active, if its heard from the point of view of it being solely a piece of music then its paradoxical beauty is lost. Read every condemnation, every scathing comment, its not fake depression cultivated by nu-metal, it's reality spat in its most real form.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback