Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
Holst: Orchestral Works, Vol. 2
 
See larger image
 

Holst: Orchestral Works, Vol. 2

1 Feb 2011 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 14.39 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:08
30
2
3:54
30
3
6:56
30
4
2:38
30
5
1:53
30
6
1:46
30
7
0:43
30
8
2:47
30
9
1:53
30
10
7:14
30
11
8:04
30
12
3:59
30
13
8:28
30
14
8:24
30
15
6:05
30
16
7:24


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Feb 2011
  • Label: Chandos
  • Copyright: (C) 2011 Chandos
  • Total Length: 1:18:16
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004KM008Q
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 138,427 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. John Manning on 5 Feb 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Little needs to be added to Amazon's CD description of the music recorded here; it is a great shame that Richard Hickox's sad demise prevented him from conducting a new recording of Holst's best known work, The Planets, but Volume 1 on Chandos (also Elgar's symphonies - more fine SACD recordings) are a fitting testimonial to his talent.
Sir Andrew Davis has no need of gimmicks but obtains a well-played, 'middle of the road' interpretation of these works. I didn't find any significant new insights, but neither did I find anything to complain about.
The Planets - a 'suite for large orchestra' - is a challenge for the recording engineer, utilising a range of percussion (all clearly recorded) and an organ which is not only used for bass underpinning but has a startling glissando in Uranus. Chandos have opted for a natural-sounding recording which sets the orchestra in a good acoustic environment with a realistic frequency and dynamic range. In this case there is a noticeable distancing which creates somewhat more blurring than in a multi-miked recording, but is arguably a more accurate representation of a live concert hall sound. Rear speakers add reverberation which reinforces the impression of naturalness.
In common with Gardiner's SACD on DG, I find that I need more amplification than usual to produce the 'airy' result that I enjoy; climaxes here are then gloriously unrestrained. As a matter of personal taste I prefer Davis's faster tempo in Mars, but Gardiner's organ glissando is more impressive. I find much to enjoy in both discs.
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By S. D. Nunn on 27 April 2011
Format: Audio CD
Well, my review is going to add to a very mixed response to this SACD. Frankly I think Chandos would be wise to withdraw this SACD and go back to the mix ... which in its current form is truly grim.

The problem is, at least with the 5.1 layer, that the orchestra is simply swamped by ambience. There is so mcuh reverberation of the reverberation that I can only assume microphones were poorly positioned. The outcome is a peculiar recording wherein you feel like you're listening against the music in order to hear ... the music.

Add to this the extremely dynamic character of the pieces on offer - where quiet is really quiet and loud is extremely LOUD - and you end up with a disc that has to be played at very high volume with remote in hand, pre-empting the peaks.

As for the music, here The Planets isn't presented in a particularly energetic way, but it's certainly an engaging performance that, I think, focuses upon the psychodrama - the internal drama - rather than the obvious epic character. The other two pieces have been, I think, unfairly criticised for not being somehow authentically oriental. That's a crazy judgment - if you're going to take that view you'll have to start with The Mikado and be ready to crucify Scheherazade ... such works are inevitably, in part, products of their age.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. S. Bower on 6 Feb 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The SACD recording of the Planets we have been waiting for. I won't be parting with my beloved MoFi of the Susskind recording, but this one, too, is extraordinary - and at a tenth the price of that rarity.

One thing I should say immediately. This is one of those recordings that HAS to be played damn loud. I raised my preamp volume by 6 dB (OK, two notches, guys...). then the sound snapped into place - and so did the performance.

You are then rewarded by palpably state-of-the-art DSD sound, smooth, airy, transparent, timbrally accurate and with fearsome dynamic range. This Chandos is not like the older, more-distanced breed that you expect from this label; but it definitely rocks. I really can't find much to criticise about the sound - unusual for me.

On first hearing, I thought the performance was good but not great - four stars. When I upped the volume, however, the extra all-round impact made it much more like 4.5. For including fine readings of the neglected Beni-Mora and Japanese suites, however, I am inclined to go the whole hog and plump for five stars, too.

Outstanding AND cheap. What more do you want?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again