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Hollow Crown Hardcover – 6 Sep 1971


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: H.Hamilton; 1st History Book Club Edition edition (6 Sep 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 024101915X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241019153
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 14 x 1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 553,916 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson on 8 Jun 2004
Format: Hardcover
In 1962, John Barton wrote a stage play for the Royal Shakespeare Company. The play was composed of various readings, songs, speeches and poetry written by or about the Kings and Queens of England from William the Conqueror to Queen Victoria. Carried forward by a collection of some of the finest stage actors in British history, the play was a success. In 1971, John Barton organized and expanded the content of the play into a book, which included many black and white images, and a few color ones. This is that book.
While John Barton's play strikes the viewer as a playful romp through British history, the book fails to generate the same enthusiasm. While the play uses different voices when moving from part to part, the book simply has text that the reader needs to read to the end to see who it was that actually said it. Also, while the play seems colorful and irreverent, the book often struck me as boring and irrelevant. I found Queen Elizabeth I's poetry interesting, but I found Queen Victoria's journal entries quite boring.
Therefore, I would say that this book is a mixed bag, with the overall quality being below what I would have wanted. If you are interested in reading various bits by and about the Royals, then this book might be for you. But, if you want a book that has a theme or conveys a message, then you might want to give this one a skip.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
Foibles at the fireside 24 July 2003
By Diane O'Toole - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
You'd need to be a history buff to come to this book "cold" - but I searched for it after seeing a Royal Shakespeare Company production of the piece and regard it as a treasure. It evokes memories of truly flawless theatre which brought the writings to life, and it's in that context that this piece is written.
The glimpses of centuries of royal life in England are drawn from a range of contemporary sources. In the beautiful edition I have, these are illustrated with contemporary carvings, etchings, drawings and paintings, subtle and restrained. I'm anticipating with great pleasure many a fireside evening dipping into the book.
A mixed bag, but overall not too good 26 Feb 2014
By Kurt A. Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
In 1962, John Barton wrote a stage play for the Royal Shakespeare Company. The play was composed of various readings, songs, speeches and poetry written by or about the Kings and Queens of England from William the Conqueror to Queen Victoria. Carried forward by a collection of some of the finest stage actors in British history, the play was a success. In 1971, John Barton organized and expanded the content of the play into a book, which included many black and white images, and a few color ones. This is that book.

While John Barton’s play strikes the viewer as a playful romp through British history, the book fails to generate the same enthusiasm. While the play uses different voices when moving from part to part, the book simply has text that the reader needs to read to the end to see who it was that actually said it. Also, while the play seems colorful and irreverent, the book often struck me as boring and irrelevant. I found Queen Elizabeth I’s poetry interesting, but I found Queen Victoria’s journal entries quite boring.

Therefore, I would say that this book is a mixed bag, with the overall quality being below what I would have wanted. If you are interested in reading various bits by and about the Royals, then this book might be for you. But, if you want a book that has a theme or conveys a message, then you might want to give this one a skip.
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