Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

History of Soviet Russia: The Bolshevik Revolution, 1917-23 Pt.1 (A history of Soviet Russia) [Paperback]

Edward Hallett Carr
1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback --  
Paperback, July 1966 --  
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

July 1966 A history of Soviet Russia
1917-23 covers the period up to Lenin's first withdrawal from the political scene in the Spring of 1923.


Product details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (July 1966)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014020749X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140207491
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 10.7 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 980,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1.0 out of 5 stars
1.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars THE BEES IN HIS BONNET 7 Jun 2011
Format:Paperback
This is a dreadful book: it is boring and at the same time deeply prejudiced; but (as Jonathan Haslam points out in `The Vices of Integrity'), it was highly praised when it was first published in the early 1950s.

In `What is History'(1962), E.H.Carr warned students against the idea that there was such a thing as totally objective history, and that they should always listen out for the bees buzzing in the historian's bonnet. When writing about the Soviet Union, Carr had two very large bees: he was a great admirer of Lenin and he believed that the USSR was here to stay.

We forget how dominant the USSR seemed between 1945 and its collapse in 1991. It did seem that it had proved itself by its defeat of Nazi Germany, and that some form of communism was likely to prevail in a large part of the world, for the foreseeable future. Carr gave these views respectability, by writing what appeared to be an objective and well-documented history of the original Bolshevik Revolution. As A.L. Rowse pointed out in `Historians I Have Known', the book was one long excuse for communism, and therefore for tyranny. It was also a variation on the theme that, while Stalin was a 'bad guy', Lenin was a good one. Therefore, the system he created could be saved. Communism did not necessarily mean dictatorship.

Carr seemed to think that the victory of communism was inevitable, because it has so far proved successful. Therefore there was no point in condemning it. Within ten years of his death, the whole system collapsed under its own weight. We already knew that the system created by Lenin was a tyranny. Now we learned that it had developed feet of clay. Almost no-one regretted its death; and almost no-one now believes in the idea that Lenin was really one of the good guys.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent 13 Nov 2002
By "alphaq80" - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is the definitive source for an unbiased account of the Russian Revolution. Volume one of a three volume series, it covers the origins of the Bolshevik party to and through the taking of power in 1917. The most immediately apparent attribute to this work is its even handedness; this is the place to go if you want an account of what really happened, not the traditional right-wing or left-wing spin.
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant introduction to the revolution that stopped World War One 12 Aug 2010
By William Podmore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is the first volume in Carr's monumental, 10-volume History of Soviet Russia. This brilliant introduction looks at the main lines of future development.

Carr mentions `the bloodless victory of the revolution in October 1917'.

Lenin defined the rule for party membership: "A member of the party is one who accepts its programme, and supports it both materially and by personal participation in one of its organisations." As Plekhanov wrote sensibly, "When we are told that social-democracy ought to guarantee full freedom of opinion to its members, it is forgotten that a political party is not an academy of science. ... Freedom of opinion in the party can and should be limited precisely because a party is a freely constituted union of men of like mind. Once identity of opinion vanishes, dissolution becomes inevitable." Carr sums up, "party members retained their freedom of action until, though only until, the party decision had been taken."

Carr cites a revolutionary who said, "In the struggle which was necessary many guilty persons fell without the forms of trial, and, with them, some innocent. These I deplore as much as anybody and shall deplore some of them to the day of my death. But I deplore them as I should have done had they fallen in battle. It was necessary to use the arm of the people, a machine not quite so blind as balls and bombs, but blind to a certain degree." Who said this? Lenin? Che? No, the great American democrat Thomas Jefferson.

When the Menshevik authorities fired on a workers' gathering, in 1918, Lenin commented, "When we use shootings they turn Tolstoyans and shed crocodile tears over our harshness. They have forgotten how they helped Kerensky to drive the workers to the slaughter, keeping the secret treaties hidden in their pockets."

As Carr notes of the Social-Revolutionaries' attempted coup in May 1918, "the open revolt of the last considerable independent party had driven the regime a long step further on the road to the one-party state."

The separation of powers is only relative in class society. The idea reflected the brief period of triple power in early 17th-century Britain, when the king wielded executive power, the aristocracy ran the House of Lords and the bourgeoisie ran the House of Commons. But with the Commonwealth, the state became unitary. The legislature, the executive and the judiciary were different tools doing the same job, keeping the ruling class in power. This is true of bourgeois as of working class dictatorship. The notion of a separate and independent judiciary is a myth; the Lord Chancellor has legislative, executive and judicial powers; law is always an instrument of state power. (See J.A.G. Griffiths, The politics of the judiciary.)

Carr argues, "The very notion of a constitutional act implied in western thought a law to which the state itself was subject; this conception was incompatible with a doctrine which regarded law as a creation of the state." But this is undialectical: who makes the law? The people create both the state and the law. The people can apply to the state the laws they create.

Carr points out that the phrase `dictatorship of the proletariat' specifies which class rules; it is neutral on the form of government. The dictatorship of the bourgeoisie is often wielded through a representative parliament. Dictatorship, in `dictatorship of the proletariat', does not necessarily mean the rule of one or a few.
6 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars THE BEES IN HIS BONNET 7 Jun 2011
By Stephen Cooper - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a dreadful book: it is boring and at the same time deeply prejudiced; but (as Jonathan Haslam points out in `The Vices of Integrity'), it was highly praised when it was first published in the early 1950s.

In `What is History'(1962), E.H.Carr warned students against the idea that there was such a thing as totally objective history, and that they should always listen out for the bees buzzing in the historian's bonnet. When writing about the Soviet Union, Carr had two very large bees: he was a great admirer of Lenin and he believed that the USSR was here to stay.

We forget how dominant the USSR seemed between 1945 and its collapse in 1991. It did seem that it had proved itself by its defeat of Nazi Germany, and that some form of communism was likely to prevail in a large part of the world, for the foreseeable future. Carr gave these views respectability, by writing what appeared to be an objective and well-documented history of the original Bolshevik Revolution. As A.L. Rowse pointed out in `Historians I Have Known', the book was one long excuse for communism, and therefore for tyranny. It also argued that, while Stalin might have perverted the system, Lenin's creation was essentially benign.

Carr seemed to think that the victory of communism was inevitable, because it has so far proved successful. Therefore there was no point in condemning it. Within ten years of his death, the whole system collapsed under its own weight. We already knew how tyrannical the monster was. Now we learned that it had developed feet of clay. There were very few who regretted its passing; and there are very few historians who would argue that Soviet communism was anything other than Lenin's creation.

There is no longer a place for a book like this in the modern world. As Marx might have said, it ought to be relegated to the dustbin of history.

Stephen Cooper
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xa65df474)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback