Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£7.19
  • RRP: £8.99
  • You Save: £1.80 (20%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Trade in your item
Get a £0.29
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 11 Jun 2009


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.19
£3.59 £4.25

Frequently Bought Together

The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia (Oxford World's Classics) + Robinson Crusoe (Wordsworth Classics)
Price For Both: £9.18

Buy the selected items together


Earn a Free Kindle Book
Earn a Free Kindle Book
Buy a book between now and 31 March and receive a promotional code good for one free Kindle book. Terms and conditions apply. Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; Reprint edition (11 Jun 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019922997X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199229970
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 1.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 43,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"The globalization of literary studies has produced fascinating insights into the cultural interactions between Europe and the East, and Europe and the Americas during the eighteenth century. Jessica Richard's enterprising edition of Johnson's Rasselas brings out the global interests of this popular tale by placing it firmly in the context of enlightenment Orientalism. It highlights Johnson's cosmopolitan universalism, for while embracing cultural difference he reverses the Oriental gaze, and uses the conventions of the Oriental tale to historicize his exploration of human desire and happiness. This new Broadview edition offers an excellent introduction to Johnson's global status."--Greg Clingham --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Thomas Keymer is the editor of three outstanding editions for OWC: Fielding Joseph Andrews and Shamela, Richardson, Pamela, and Defoe, Robinson Crusoe. He has co-edited The Cambridge Companion to English Literature from 1740 to 1830 with Jon Mee (2004), and is the editor of the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to Laurence Sterne.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Paul Anthony on 3 Sep 2014
Format: Paperback
Excellent edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Edwin Underhill on 22 Dec 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well worth reading even though few, sadly, will consider it today yet it is completely up to date in the story.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Melicious on 13 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In my opinion, there is just too much nothing going on in this book; the story is not very interesting and it doesn't have much action.
I have recently decided never to not recommend a book ever again because, quite frankly, what I may dislike might be a book you would thoroughly enjoy and viceversa. So, take a chance on it if you think you might enjoy the topic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Richard Hodges on 15 May 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book was the one I wanted, but whilst I knew it was used , I was not aware that it's condition was at best poor . The pages are scruffy with whole sections of the book underlined in biro . Very dissappointing , I regret I would not recommend .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A prince's search for happiness 17 Dec 2010
By Jeffrey Van Wagoner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I finally got around to reading something from the great Samuel Johnson, who had such a significant impact in the 18th century. This is a relatively short novel about a prince that is effectively imprisoned in "happy valley" along with the emperor's other sons and daughters to protect them from the vicissitudes of life. The price grows weary of the place and escapes along with his sister and a poet.

The story involves their search for happiness and the type of life that they should lead. They explore the lives of the rich and powerful, the poor, scientists, farmers, and many other life styles. There is much philosophical discussion that I found interesting, but I'm not sure that this style of writing would appeal to most modern readers. Even with all of the dialogue, it is still a relatively short book. Subjects that were explored included whether it is better to be married or single, rich or poor, powerful or a subject, educated or ignorant.

I would recommend this book to those interested in philosophy and what was in the 18th century one of the most popular of books. For those looking for an adventure novel, this is not the place to look.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
alright 29 Mar 2014
By A. Meyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Although this was an interesting book I did have many times where I simply drifted into other pursuits and left the book just sitting there. The story is about a prince and his companions who are determined to find out the way of life and what is the best for them. In the beginning the prince pines to know the outside world and all its woes because he was stuck in a world where pleasure was the only thing he knew. Once they are on their way they discover time and time again that no matter what, whether it was the philosopher, or the hermit, or the isolated scientist, it didn't matter, they all felt that their life was pursued pointlessly and wished for something else.
This is something perhaps all young people should read (if they can keep their attention on it long enough), since it does hammer home the old saying the grass is always greener on the other side, and that sayings futility. One must learn to balance life with purpose and knowledge that when you grasp for one thing you inevitably end up losing another which you had. It is much like choosing paths, once chosen the others close up and regret is perhaps all you may have left after that unless you are given to a higher purpose.
A classic, perhaps some lessons for millenials and younger. 20 Sep 2014
By John L. Miller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This classic work is more than 250 years old, but is easily accessible and readable today.

It's a philosophical work, a discourse between a prince, a princess, a wise teacher, and people representing the various segments of society. Rasselas seeks happiness and fulfillment. All he discovers is that each person is discontent with their own life, and wishes they took a different path. Rasselas is arguably in the best position of any of them, and yet does not appreciate it.

Consider it a series of short essays, each where a thief, a farmer, a rich merchant, a king, and so on expounds upon what they hoped to get from their life, and why it isn't ideal.

It's as entertaining to read as a collection of essays (not my cup of tea), and for me with decades of adult life under my belt, held little in the way of surprises and insight. Read it as a necessary work of earlier light philosophy, perhaps, but I don't believe there'll be answers or surprises here for anyone over 30.
"Look Inside" is misleading 5 Dec 2014
By J. Michael - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Johnson's Rasselas is a psychologically acute tale of the search for happiness, as relevant today as it was when first published. But the purpose of my post is to register my objection to the "Look Inside" feature on this page. If one attempts to look inside this book, one is taken to the Oxford edition instead. This renders the feature useless for those of us comparing editions for the purpose of classroom adoption.
An excellent read, as one would expect from Dr 8 July 2014
By Thomas Byrne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
An excellent read, as one would expect from Dr. Johnson. A profoundly intellectual book, but within the grasp on any educated and experienced adult reader.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback