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History of the American People Paperback – 16 Nov 2000


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Product details

  • Paperback: 1142 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix Press; New edition edition (16 Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842124250
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842124253
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 5.4 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,013,365 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Book Description

A magnificent book which reinterprets every aspect of American history

About the Author

Paul Johnson was born in 1928 and educated at Stonyhurst and Magdalen College, Oxford. He has enjoyed a varied career, which includes army service and international journalism. He has contributed to many of the world's most famous newspapers and magazines and has travelled to all five continents to report events, interview presidents and prime ministers for the press and TV, and to lecture to academic and business audiences.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Nov. 2001
Format: Paperback
An interesting and informative book. Johnson broadly defines his subject geographically (the territories now comprising the mainland United States) and chronologically (the post-Columbian period) but his real aim, and his great skill, is to trace the origins and history of the political entity, and the people, now known as the USA. There is little coverage of Indian history, but that, to be fair, is outside Johnson's mandate.
Johnson's style is anecdotal and character-focussed. Perhaps because of this, he is at his most formidable when dealing with the early days of the Union, when great individuals could truly influence the shape of a nation. However his writing remains colourful, yet pertinent and firmly grounded in fact, throughout. Other areas of strength include Johnson's ability to decipher the true founding principles of the American project, and to express them through the eyes of the ordinary American; and to mark out the role of religion as a creative force, especially in the earliest days of settlement.
Johnson's style is enthusiastic and he is not afraid to show that, as a historian and an Englishman, he greatly admires the American nation. His approval, however, is factually backed, and he is not afraid to criticise those who, though devoted to their own concept of the American dream, had their heads in the clouds or their fingers in the till. He has thoroughly mixed opinions of such American luminaries as Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson. Overall his work presents a generally balanced tone though the reader may wish subsequently to explore the work of more adverse Americologists.
If there is one criticism of the book, it is that it becomes thinner in its coverage of issues during the twentieth century.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S W. vanOs on 6 April 2002
Format: Paperback
Simply stated, this has got to be one of the best one volume histories of the USA. The author writes with enthusiasm for his subject and also a lot of love and respect for the whole American enterprise. The book itself is a real page turner and challenged some of my own preconceived notions about certain events in American history. It was a delight to read and was one of those books that I was actually sad about finishing in the end. Just read it and above all, enjoy it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By William Cohen VINE VOICE on 8 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
It took me ten years, and I had to buy three copies of the book, but yesterday 7 June 2008, I finished Paul Johnson's big, fat doorstep of a history. It was very satisfying. My enthusiasm for starting again was kicked off by a visit to New York and Washington earlier this year.

Johnson is a journalist, and his prejudice makes for lively copy. Having read his account of each President I was rushing off to Wikipedia to see if other people agreed with his points of view. I like the way he shows that Prohibition stimulated the culture of organised crime, and helped to strengthen the immigrant communities. So without the Prohibition, no Godfather and no Sopranos.

He hates Clinton, loves Eisenhower. He hates Theodore Roosevelt and the Kennedys, and loves Richard Nixon. Many of his views are typical of a British Conservative in the 1990s. He doesn't seem to impressed by Martin Luther King. He's opposed to welfarism. Still, from his conclusions, he would have seen George W. Bush and the Second Iraq War coming. He refers to the "Jupiter Complex" - the American habit of dropping bombs on recalcitrant states that incur their wrath.

He explains the Americans intermittent love of persecution, and their love of freedom. He covers the differences between the North and the South, the peculiar history of the slave trade, the genius of the Founding Fathers, the grip of religion, and their passion for commerce. Johnson is interested in art and culture, and he has fascinating things to say about architecture, painting, literature and self-help books.

I feel I can go through the rest of my life with an excellent in-depth insight into the history of the greatest nation on earth.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. A. Harris on 20 Jun. 2001
Format: Paperback
If you are interested in the history of the United States, from the first European settlers through to Bill Clinton, and have several hours to spare to study the subject you cannot help but enjoy Paul Johnson's marvellous journey through America old and new. Johnson keeps the reader interested by provided a portrait of the main protagonists through the comments of their contemporaries, as well as their own writings and provides analysis of the thousands of issues that have made the United States what it is today, from settlement to revolution and from civil war to world war, enabling the reader to envisage and understand the trial, torment, tragedy, triumph and resolution that has forged the USA. An absolute must for any scholar of US history, or of US relations with Europe.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Oct. 2000
Format: Paperback
Johnson's work is a worthy achievement and, to counter the earlier reviewer's opinion that there is too much focus on religion in the book, I think more needs to be said on the context religion is presented in and why.
In tracing the evolution of the United States Johnson explores four interweaving threads of historical context; religion, politics, commerce and culture. The US, as much as any country and probably more so, has been shaped by religious concerns. The Puritan founding fathers escaping from religious orthodoxy in Britain, waves of immigrants escaping from religious persecution in Europe and elsewhere, the use of Christian religion to justify or condemn slavery are just a few examples.
The deep moral convictions observed in the American people (however they might manifest) have grown from four centuries of religious, primarily Christian, reformist activity. A great strength of Johnson's work is to paint the 'big picture' of American history but to also track the character and motivation of the people as a whole; the faceless masses with their countless untold personal histories. As he notes in the book, life on the frontier afforded few entertainments and many hardships - the Bible tended to sate both needs.
America was founded on principles of religious tolerance and where Johnson's work succeeds is in showing the American people's continuing efforts to uphold, interpret and occasionally challenge these founding principles against a vibrant ever-shifting tide of political, economic and cultural ideology. Religion plays no more an important part in the history than that.
If I were to level a criticism at the book it would be at the bias shown towards the benefit of laissez-faire government.
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