Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Historical Handbook of Major Biblical Interpreters Hardcover – 31 Jul 1998


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£18.28


Product details

  • Hardcover: 600 pages
  • Publisher: InterVarsity Press (31 July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830814523
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830814527
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,752,385 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Donald K. McKim

Dr. Donald K. McKim is Executive Editor for Theology and Reference for Westminster John Knox Press and Editor for "Being Reformed: Faith Seeking Understanding" for Congregational Ministries Publishing of the Presbyterian Church (USA). He has served as Academic Dean and Professor of Theology at Memphis Theological Seminary (1993-2000) and as Professor of Theology at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary (1981-1988). Dr. McKim has also been Visiting Professor of Theology at Eastern Baptist Seminary in Philadelphia and Columbia Seminary's Center for Theological Studies in Orlando, Florida as well as Adjunct Professor of Theology at Colgate Rochester Divinity School in Rochester, New York and Adjunct Faculty at Rhodes College, Memphis. Dr. McKim is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA). He was Interim Pastor of the Central Presbyterian Church in Downingtown, Pennsylvania and the Trinity Presbyterian Church of Berwyn, Pennsylvania as well as Stated Supply Pastor of Friendship, Parish, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. For two years he was a Visiting Faculty member in the Religion Department of Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and of the Buechner Institute.

Dr. McKim is a 1971 cum laude graduate of Westminster with Honors in Religion and won four prizes at the College in the Religion and Philosophy Department. He graduated from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary with the Master of Divinity degree magna cum laude in 1974. There he was the recipient of the Thomas Jamison Scholarship and the Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship for graduate study and five awards in the areas of biblical studies, church history, and theology. He received the Ph.D. degree in Religion from the University of Pittsburgh in 1980.

Dr. McKim's co-authored book (with Jack B. Rogers), The Authority and Interpretation of the Bible: An Historical Approach (Harper & Row, 1979) was selected "Book of the Year" by Eternity magazine and named one of the five best books in Religion in the American Book Awards for 1980. His other books include Ever a Vision: A Brief History of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1959-2009 (Eerdmans, 2009); Presbyterian Questions, Presbyterian Answers: Exploring Christian Faith (Geneva Press, 2003); Presbyterian Beliefs: A Brief Introduction (Geneva Press, 2003); Introducing the Reformed Faith (Westminster John Knox Press, 2001); Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms (Westminster John Knox, 1996); The Bible in Theology and Preaching (Abingdon, 1994); Theological Turning Points (John Knox, 1988); Ramism in William Perkins' Theology (Peter Lang, 1987); and What Christians Believe About the Bible (Thomas Nelson, 1985). He has also written Kerygma: The Bible and Theology I, II, III, IV (The Kerygma Program, 1993; 1994; 1995; 1996). With Robert Benedetto and Darrell L. Guder he is co-author of the Historical Dictionary of the Reformed Churches (Scarecrow, 1999; 2nd edition with Robert Benedetto, 2009). Dr. McKim has edited Dictionary of Major Biblical Interpreters (InterVarsity, 2007);Calvin and the Bible (Cambridge University Press, 2006); The Cambridge Companion to John Calvin (Cambridge University Press, 2004); The Cambridge Companion to Martin Luther (Cambridge University Press, 2003); The Westminster Handbook to Reformed Theology (Westminster John Knox Press, 2001); Calvin's Institutes: Abridged Edition (Westminster John Knox Press, 2000); Historical Handbook of Major Biblical Interpreters (InterVarsity, 1998); God Never Forgets: Faith, Hope, and Alzheimer's Disease (Westminster John Knox, 1997); the Encyclopedia of the Reformed Faith (Westminster/John Knox and St. Andrews Press, 1992); Major Themes in the Reformed Tradition (Eerdmans, 1992); A Guide to Contemporary Hermeneutics (Eerdmans, 1986); How Karl Barth Changed My Mind (Eerdmans, 1986); Readings in Calvin's Theology (Baker, 1984) and The Authoritative Word: Essays on the Nature of Scripture (Eerdmans, 1983). Dr. McKim has published over sixty articles and four-hundred book reviews.

Dr. McKim is married to Dr. LindaJo McKim. They have two grown sons. Their address is: 7969 Burntwood Cove Germantown, TN 38138-6033. Phone: 901-752-0770; Fax: 901-759-0788. Email: donmckim@comcast.net.
1


Product Description

Synopsis

This is an informative introduction to the l ife and work of more than a hundred biblical interpreters fr om the second century to the present. ' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The history of Christian theology, and thus the history of Christianity, is inextricably linked with the history of the way that Christian have read the Bible. This has not been consistent over the course of the last few millennia, and having a grasp on this history of Biblical interpretation is essential for anyone who wants to keep up with or make sense of the rapid pace of change in the field of biblical interpretation today.
Perhaps at no other period in history has the number of ways the Bible can be read, interpreted, and used been as varied as it is today. This can be easily seen by a simple examination of the table of contents of Donald McKim's 'Historical Handbook of Major Biblical Interpreters'. The number of major interpreters from just the nineteenth and twentieth centuries outnumbers the interpreters from the preceeding 18 centuries.
A word on the word interpretation -- this has become a dirty word of sorts by some denominations, who pride themselves on not interpreting the Bible, but taking it literally. However, as one can see by examining the history of biblical exegesis, taking the scripture literally is in fact an interpretation. McKim doesn't (nor do I) discount the historicity or validity of literal interpretation as an expression of biblical interpretation.
Christianity has been interpreting scriptures since the very beginning; even Jesus interpreted the Hebrew scriptures for disciples and others. As the canon of the Bible came to be solidified in form, the work of interpreting this centuries-to-millennia-old texts for the emerging Christendom took on major importance, and was seen for the longest time as the primary (and sometimed exclusive) responsibility of the church.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Who thought what, when, where, and why... 17 Jun 2003
By FrKurt Messick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The history of Christian theology, and thus the history of Christianity, is inextricably linked with the history of the way that Christian have read the Bible. This has not been consistent over the course of the last few millennia, and having a grasp on this history of Biblical interpretation is essential for anyone who wants to keep up with or make sense of the rapid pace of change in the field of biblical interpretation today.
Perhaps at no other period in history has the number of ways the Bible can be read, interpreted, and used been as varied as it is today. This can be easily seen by a simple examination of the table of contents of Donald McKim's 'Historical Handbook of Major Biblical Interpreters'. The number of major interpreters from just the nineteenth and twentieth centuries outnumbers the interpreters from the preceeding 18 centuries.
A word on the word interpretation -- this has become a dirty word of sorts by some denominations, who pride themselves on not interpreting the Bible, but taking it literally. However, as one can see by examining the history of biblical exegesis, taking the scripture literally is in fact an interpretation. McKim doesn't (nor do I) discount the historicity or validity of literal interpretation as an expression of biblical interpretation.
Christianity has been interpreting scriptures since the very beginning; even Jesus interpreted the Hebrew scriptures for disciples and others. As the canon of the Bible came to be solidified in form, the work of interpreting this centuries-to-millennia-old texts for the emerging Christendom took on major importance, and was seen for the longest time as the primary (and sometimed exclusive) responsibility of the church.
However, there has always been a give and take between academic and formally-trained interpretation and more personal avenues of interpretation. 'The practice of biblical exegesis takes place at a host of levels by a wide array of people. Indeed, whenever anyone reads the Bible and explicates its meaning, biblical interpretation is taking place.'
McKim's volume focusses on the most significant interpreters, as defined by those who have had impact on others following and the raising of important issues. Alas, as McKim comments in the preface, there are many other interpreters who might be included, but for space considerations. As it is, this is a lengthy, 630+ page reference volume with relatively small print, presented in a double-column format.
The sections are arranged in chronological order, so that for the 'sit-down-and-read-it-straight-through' reader, the development over time of biblical interpretation will be seen easily (however, it is not a strict chronology -- the individual articles in the sections are arranged alphabetically by interpreter). Attached to each article is a bibliography, broken into two parts: Works of the interpreter being highlighted, and Studies which focus on or analyse the work of the interpreter. The book is also cross-referenced for easy use to see developmental strands that do not occur in direct chronological succession.
Nearly 100 contributors, major scholars in the study of the language, historical period, or person being highlighted, have been included in this work. Interpreters are divided into the following broad categories:
Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church
Biblical Interpretation in the Middle Ages
Biblical Interpretation in the 16th and 17th Centuries
Biblical Interpretation in the 18th and 19th Centuries
Biblical Interpretation in 20th Century Europe
Biblical Interpretation in 20th Century North America
From Athanasius (an early church father in Alexandria) to contemporary interpreters such as Walter Brueggemann and Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, essays on interpreters includes a short biography, and proceeds to give critical descriptions of the major aspects of their work.
This is not only a valuable reference for students and scholars, but an ideal volume for the arm-chair theologian, or really anyone who is interested in learning more about the Bible and how it has been viewed through time.
With such a large number of contributors, it is difficult to find a 'representative' example of writing to illustrate. However, McKim is no stranger to the editing of major reference works, having been editor also of the Westminster Dictionary of Theological Terms and the Encyclopedia of the Reformed Faith, both of which are highly regarded for their authority, comprehensiveness and clarity.
McKim does address the need for further volumes which expand beyond the scope of this work. 'Studies of women interpreters are underrepresented, as are studies of those who are not Western, white males. This volume is clearly oriented toward those who have produced significant work in the Western branch of the Christian church and whose writings have, on the whole, emerged from Europe or North America. This is where predominant writings have been produced since the Middle Ages. Further books should one day be created to highlight the contributions of those not represented in this volume.'
Despite this limitation, this is nonetheless a necessary volume for the understanding of biblical interpretation issues, and can serve both as a handy reference or a narrative study.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
A mammoth enterprise. 30 Nov 1999
By Rick Aguirre - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This work is huge. It is double-columned and covers the major biblical interpreters of the church' history. If you need a comprehensive reference work this is it. From Athanasius to G.E Wright. It is easily one of my top five favorite books I had the pleasure of reading in 99.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
It's big, expensive, and worth every penny 18 Feb 2008
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the standard texts of biblical interpretation.

Before every era, there is a short chapter describing the major themes that were debated during that time period. For example, in the earliest era, the chapter compares Origen and Augustine's ideas. Then there is a list of the major interpreters listed in alphabetical order, with a short biography of their main arguments and an even shorter biography of the man discussed.

It covers the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and then jumps to the 18th and 19th centuries.

Those looking for the newest themes in biblical interpretation will be disappointed, however. In the 20th century the biographies seem to stop with about 1970. Other than that, this is invaluable.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Amazing Work of Incredible Magnitude 1 Oct 2000
By Karen E. Hunt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This wonderful work is a selection of well-written contributions about the life and work of many Biblical scholars who are legend to any student of scripture.
Especially of note is Dr. L. D. Hurst's contribution about G. B. Caird. Dr. Hurst description of "New Testament Theology" which describes the work beautifully and accurately.
All in all, it is a work to treasure.
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Amazing Work of Incredible Magnitude 1 Oct 2000
By Karen E. Hunt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This wonderful work is a selection of well-written contributions about the life and work of many Biblical scholars who are legend to any student of scripture.
Especially of note is Dr. L. D. Hurst's contribution about G. B. Caird. Dr. Hurst description of "New Testament Theology" which describes the work beautifully and accurately.
All in all, it is a work to treasure.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback