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Hindemith: Kammermusik (2 CDs)
 
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Hindemith: Kammermusik (2 CDs)

7 April 2003 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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1:08
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4:27
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1:56
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1:28
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5:43
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2:28
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4:19
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7:32
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3:18
Disc 2
30
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1:56
30
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5:28
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7:21
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3:16
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2:10
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4:08
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8:11
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3:28
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3:22
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3:49
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6:46
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4:17
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1:23
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3:35
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6:55
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6:35
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 7 April 2003
  • Release Date: 7 April 2003
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2003 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:17:55
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001N05ZBU
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 34,453 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joshua H on 28 Aug. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Written between 1921 and 1927, Hindemith's 'Kammermusik' includes 8 works for chamber groups. The music is harmonically and rhythmically exciting, and superbly performed by Chailly and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. With this recording detail is greatly observed.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
Spikey Early Modernism 20 Mar. 2005
By Christopher Forbes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Poor Paul Hindemith. He began his career as one of music's bad boys, a position guarenteed by his scandalous expressionist opera Sancta Susannah and ended his life as the arch conservative of his era. He created a modern system every bit as rigorous as Schoenberg's and yet within a few years of his death that system was dropped by almost any composer still using it. And he enthusiastically embraced the idea of writing music for practical use, including children's works, and works for student instrumentalists. As a result, most people have the overwhelming impression that the composer was a prolific, well crafted, but not very inspired journeyman musician. However in Hindemith's strongest pieces this impression is exposed as the falsehood that it is. The composer could be capable of music at the highest level of inspiration, and which reached for new sonority in a most uncompromising manner.

The Kammermusik represented on this disc are products of Hindemith's first musical maturity. Written primarily in the 1920s these mini-concerti are chalk full of melodic sparkle and harmonic invention. The varied chamber orchestras in the works are dominated by wind sonorities which can't help but bring out associations with jazz and American popular music. But the beatifully crafted counterpoint harkens to the composer's love and reverence for Bach. The language is tonal, but Hindemith stretches the bonds of tonality in ways that come close to the expressionism of the Viennese school, without the accompanying hysteria and angst. Each of the concerti is characterized by the sound of its solo instrument, but they all share a formal debt to the Bach Brandenburg concerti and to American Dance Bands. The music is often quite dissonant, but at the end of the day the bright melodic material and exhuberant high spirits win over atonal anxiety.

This recording includes all of the Kammermusik concerti, along with the Kleine Kammermusik...really a suite for Wind Quintet. Chailly is magnificent in this repertoire. He does not shy away from the thorny passages but still infuses the works with high spirits and a warmth that is not usually associated with Hindemith. Highly recommended as an introduction into this composer and what makes him truly special.
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Highly virtuoso performing. 14 Nov. 2005
By Paco Yáñez - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I know two recordings of this concerts, this one and the played by the Ensemble Modern (RCA). Both are really outstanding, a bit more classical this one conducted by Chailly (Decca) and more modernist the german one, conducted by Markus Stenz.

Chailly conducting I based on technical perfection, great musicality and the total well-balanced presence of the orchestra, which really sounds like a soloist. The rhythm of every piece is really well chosen by Chailly, with fresh tempi conducting, a really joy for yours ears and one of the most remarkable Chailly's CDs by the critics and reviewers.

The sound is really very good and it's now available in mid price after many years very hard to find.

It's a great complement to have Ensemble Modern's version, because of the very different sound they can produce, much more like chamber music and more modern, apart of being more technical and "german".
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
excellent recording 29 July 2003
By Jeremiah Lawson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The sound quality on this disc is good and the performances are also first rate. The inclusion of Kleine Kammermusik (the woodwind quintet) is unusual but welcome.
If you're not a Hindemith fan then this CD will be too big a dose for you. This is all early material and the influence of Stravinsky on Hindemith's early work really shows in this series, especially in kammermusik 1 where hints of Petrushka can be heard. The most popular works in this series deserve their pride of place, the first work, the wind quintet, and the cello and viola concertos. The piano and violin concertos are too much formal elegance over tunes for my taste, even as a Hindemith fan.
The organ concerto's a bit later and reflects more of the Mathis der Maler era Hindemith.
If you're just looking for the more accessible Hindemith works from this series go for another disk but if you want a solid recording of the whole cycle this is the album you want.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Fine Hindemith set 20 Sept. 2005
By Critic at large - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
First things first, I am a big Hindemith fan. I am also a big fan of chamber music of all eras, so yes, this fits my tastes. Then there is the matter of the peformance and engineering, first rate. Chailly is a fine conductor and the Concertgebouw is a great orchestra. The sound is good.

Now, why would one buy this set of CDs? Answer, because Hindemith is an overlooked, underrated 20th century composer who was NOT merely a technician, or competent teacher, but a fine composer in his own right.

He saw himself in the line of Bach and the compositionally oriented Germans, and as such his music emphasizes compositional technique. But, like the composers from whom he drew inspiration, he was able to take the traditions he inherited and change them into something new and original. His music is frequently /always intellectual, so if you are looking for pure emotional experience, look elsewhere, but if you find beauty in intellect, have a listen to these.

I think part of the problem with Hindemith is that he was truly one who understood a compositional tradition, and is therefore labeled an uninspired technician by some. But what is wrong with being inspired by traditions? Bach was the same, he wrote counterpoint and was aware of the traditions from which he came. At the same time, he was an original. He used the tradition, studied the works of other composers both of his own German tradition and those of Italy and France. Then he composed high art.

Perhaps Hindemith had the misfortune of being active in a time when after more than a century of Austro-Germanic domination, composers were looking elsewhere. Trying to be "new" and "modern", and especially to break tradition. I don't think that this means that Hindemith was automatically suspect, nor should he be to those who want to explore.

My advice, if what I've said interests you, then give this a try and listen closely. If you don't like reviews like this one that draw on analogies and try to convice you to see Hindemith in a different light than the bad rap he frequently gets, so be it. Have a look at the other reveiws too, I don't disagree with any of their major points.

If you want to ease into Hindemith a little and prefer an immediate emotional orientation, then have a look at his requiem or his works for orchestra such as Mathis der Mahler. But before you dismiss Hindemith as a technician alone, please listen to his music. This CD set, along the other works I've mentioned, is one of the best places to start.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Refreshing up to date recording of fantastic music 29 Nov. 2003
By Kenneth A. Martinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I first became aware of this music through an old Amsterdam Concertgebouw recording. I have listened to that old LP several times, and I was very excited to hear of this new up to date version. This new version stacks up very well compared to the old one I had heard. The Kammermusik No. 1 is good here, but I do prefer my old LP more on that one. Kammermusik No. 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 are all equally good on both recordings. The Kammermusik No. 5 (with Kim Kashkashian, viola) blows the other recording by Paul Doktor away. Kashkashian's imagination, tone quality and intonation are impeccable and refreshing. That track is the highlight of this compilation, and make the CD set well worth the purchase.

Kenneth Martinson, professor of Viola at University of Florida
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