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High Frontier Paperback – Sep 1982


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Paperback, Sep 1982
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Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Anchor Books; Reprint edition (Sep 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385182325
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385182324
  • Product Dimensions: 20.1 x 13.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,746,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Amazon Review

Rocket man, I think it's going to be a long, long time. When Princeton physicist Gerard K. O'Neill published the first edition of High Frontier back in the mid-70s (just four years after "Rocket Man," to be exact), he just assumed that some of us would be living in orbit by now. Or as the Space Studies Institute's George Friedman puts it in a new essay for this third edition of O'Neill's pioneering work, the L5 society's slogan "L5 in '95!" certainly wasn't referring to 2095.

In High Frontier, O'Neill had mapped out a straightforward, manifestly doable path to putting humans into space permanently and sustainably, using 1970s material and current-day Zubrin-style know-how. But O'Neill died in 1992 seeing humanity no closer to fulfilling his bold vision. Freeman Dyson points out in a new introduction to this edition that in many ways we've actually backslided, that the International Space Station (and the current role of NASA) is "not a step forward on the road to the High Frontier. It's a big step backward, a setback that will take decades to overcome."

But O'Neill's idea of pursuing an inexhaustible energy supply (solar power in space) and endless room to expand remains tantalisingly attractive. The science has only gotten easier, and the moral imperative has only become more pronounced, with the planet's resources ever-steadily squeezed and the recent knowledge that a mass-extinction event on Earth is nearly inevitable. (O'Neill calls the High Frontier the only chance to make human life--perhaps all life in the universe--"unkillable.") The High Frontier is as exciting a read as it ever was, and six new chapters provide context for the advances made in the 25 years since O'Neill's original manifesto. But perhaps the best addition to this printing is the chance to see and hear the soft-spoken physicist himself, in more than an hour of MPEG video included on the CD-ROM. --Paul Hughes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Synopsis

CD-ROM and Book. Man's on-going conquest of the solar system has been much publicised for its miraculous accomplishments. What is generally less publicised are the potential uses of space beyond simply landing men on another planet. 'Flags and foot-prints' is something we can all be proud of, but the true value of near-Earth space lies with the possibilities for manufacturing and colonisation. Processes not possible on Earth, because of atmosphere and gravity, can be employed in space to produce unique and highly desirable commodities. Habitats built in space, occupying the same orbit as the moon and made primarily from lunar raw materials, can be the necessary answer to our desperate, ever-increasing needs for living and agricultural areas. O'Neill is universally recognised as the father of the 'O'Neill colony' concept. Beginning in the 1970s, he took the original concepts and built from them a complete, realistic and attainable plan - a plan to orbit permanent colonies at the L4 and L5 Lagrange points in near-Earth space, where everyday people would live, work and play in comfort and safety in an environmentally satisfying world.

In this 3rd edition of The High Frontier, is O'Neill's original blueprint for the future, accompanied by new chapters presenting the up-to-date technologies and social considerations that impact upon and further justify the plan. This is a vision of a possible hopeful future that could already have come to pass if the human race had committed to it - it is still a source of hope for the future. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By j. on 10 Feb 2011
Format: Paperback
One could think that information in the book is dated. However, it is not the case, except for the unrealistic estimates of the price to operate the Space Shuttle. In short, a life-changing book!
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By Space on 27 Jun 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
First written in the 1970's this still stands up today. Although at the time everyone believed the nasa line/lie that the shuttle system would be flying 50-60 times a year.
I am confident that something like the High Frontier O'Neill talks about will come to pass around 2045-50. Whether it will be america that builds them is open to question however e.g. massive delays and dithering regarding the ISS station and what to do next. They seem to be locked into a' plan it then cancel it' cycle.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of a very few books on the development of massive space habitats capable of accommodating a whole civilization. Outlines an awesome and exciting future. Well written book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a supremely valuable book! Read the vision and expand your mind!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 47 reviews
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
Excellent book on practicality of space colonization 20 Aug 1997
By Brooke P. Anderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
THE HIGH FRONTIER is an excellent book on the practicality andeconomics of the human colonization of space -- very entertaining toread and full of interesting technical information. It is the classic work on the subject -- highly regarded by folks such as Carl Sagan, Isaac Asimov, and Thomas Paine (former administrator of NASA). When this influential book was first published, it changed a lot of minds throughout the world.

Is human colonization of space achievable even with 1970's-1980's technology? Could it be profitable on a global-economic scale? The author thinks so and tells us why and how; and his credentials are impressive.

The author, Dr. Gerard K. O'Neill, was a tenured professor of physics at Princeton and one of the founders of the Geostar Satellite Corporation (a company that worked on implementing GPS satellites). Many of the conclusions in the book are backed up by actual experiment and by numerous studies done both within and without NASA.

This is one of the handful of books that have helped to shape my outlook on the future of mankind -- a strong statement reserved for an excellent and influential work.

-- Brooke P. Anderson
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
Outstanding, a must-have for every reader. 20 April 2001
By J. Strout - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is amazing. This 3rd edition has two parts: the first is the original text by the late Gerard O'Neil, one of the great visionaries of the 20th century. Though things did not develop in the time scale he hoped for, his message is as valid today as it was in 1980 -- or even more so. The second part of the book is a series of chapters by contemporary leaders in the aerospace industry, and provide a fresh, modern perspective on where we've come since O'Neil's day, where we need to go, and how to get there.
The emphasis of this book is more on what we need to do, why we need to do it, and what that would be like, than on the details of "how." Other books cover the "how" in more detail. But because of the focus of this one, it is easily read by anyone; no special technical or math skills are required.
After reading only part of this book, I did some web searches and found that the concept of space solar power (which is central to O'Neil's thesis) is still very much alive today. NASA did a new study on it just a couple years ago, and it has been discussed in Congress increasingly often since then. It is a very real concept, very nearly ready for implementation. Read this book to find out why it's so very important.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Not much new 9 Feb 2002
By Alex - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
O'Niell's writings (the first 12 chapters) are as well written and exciting as ever. His vision of how humanity should enter space is unsurpassed, despite now being some 25 years old.
The additional chapters don't seem to add too much. I was hoping for a good description of where we've got to, and how things have changed. For example, in O'Niell's time, the richness, number and accessibility of Near Earth Asteroids was not known, but there is little in the book on the how these could be used to make O'Niell's original vision easier to fulfill. Likewise, Tether technology could reduce Earth launch costs and bring the vision closer to reality. None of this is covered.
John Lewis has a good section on Space Law, but to see new ideas from him, you have to read "Mining the Sky"
Overall, if you've never read The High Frontier, this book is an excellent buy. If you've already got the previous edition at home, the six chapters don't add too much, and there's better information on the internet.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Sourcebook for a generation of Space enthusiasts 27 Sep 2000
By Barry Haworth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Written in the 1970s, this book details O'Neill's vision of space colonies - huge space stations built from lunar material, selling solar power beamed to earth. Although his timetable of such colonies by the 1990s turned out to be too optimistic, this book is very much worth a look, both for historical reasons, and also to see what will happen once the price of access to space drops.
Packed with technical detail, O'Neill's plan is based on two assumptions - that the price of access to space would drop, and that the price of energy would rise. Neither came true in the early 1980s. The Space Shuttle did not make space flight cheap as promised, and low energy costs did not make space based solar power economical. In the near future though the space frontier may very well develop just as he foresaw.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
dream 28 July 2003
By Michael N. Ryan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
For those who dream of colonising Mars a hundred years from now, and the far stars in the distance, a thousand years from now, this book is a must read. For this is a world among the stars achievalble today. A land oif endless resources and land available for all to live well, and start over.
And should be required reading for all High School science students.
This is not Star Trek or Mobile Suit Gundam, this is for real.
I first came upon the first edition of this book back duirng my high school days in the public library. Everyone needs a good dream every now and then to rest their souls upon should they choose to study a nightmare.
And though I was not able to comprehend the vision, in the beginning, the dream did take root. And I firmly do wish for more books on this subject to be written. COLONIES IN SPACE by T.A. Heppenheimer being the only one I have found so far.
Dr. O'Neill envisions a world of endless resources built from the moon. And it can be achieved.
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