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Hidden (cache) [DVD]

124 customer reviews

Price: £4.49 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Actors: Daniel Auteuil, Juliette Binoche, Maurice Benichou, Annie Girardot, Bernard le Coq
  • Directors: Michael Haneke
  • Producers: Veit Heiduschka
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 19 Jun. 2006
  • Run Time: 118 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (124 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000EJ9NIW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,501 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Writer/director Michael Haneke delivers a masterpiece of unsettlement. Life seems perfect for Georges (Daniel Auteuil) and Anne (Juliette Binoche), a bourgeois Parisian couple who live in a comfortable home with their adolescent son, Pierrot (Lester Makedonsky). But when an anonymous videotape turns up on their doorstep, showing their house under surveillance from across the street, their calm life begins to spiral out of control. Subsequent videotapes arrive, accompanied by mysterious drawings, and gradually Georges becomes convinced that he's being tormented by a figure from his past. But when he confronts him, the man assures Georges he is innocent. A growing sense of guilt begins to rise in Georges as he recalls his less-than-angelic childhood, yet for some reason he's unable to be completely honest with Anne. Soon, their happy home is an emotional battleground, leading to a climax that is breathtaking in its ferocity and ambiguousness.

From Amazon.co.uk

A tense, taut and unsettling thriller, Hidden is a film that expertly follows television presenter Georges, whose seemingly perfect life is shattered when he receives a videotape. On it is a lengthy stream of surveillance footage of his home, shot from just across the street. And it’s just the first of many. Further tapes, accompanied by strange and disturbing drawings, start to arrive, leaving Georges, his wife and his teenage son unsettled.

The film slowly builds from there, as Georges starts looking to his past to try and find the answer to who is sending the tapes, only to find himself increasingly disturbed by the memories he recalls.

Grounded by excellent performances from Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche, Hidden is a masterclass in slow-burning cinema. It has no easy answers, boasts some quite superb direction, and it’s also distinctly unconventional in how it goes about its business (right from the opening titles). Director Michael Haneke (The Piano Teacher) cleverly works his story across several levels, and while, come the end credits, some may initially find themselves underwhelmed, here’s a film that stays in the brain long after the stop button has been pressed. Granted, it won’t be to all tastes, but those that do find themselves engrossed are likely to agree that this is one of the finest French films in many years.--Jon Foster

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 22 July 2006
Format: DVD
I wasn't prepared for how powerful Caché turned out to be: it's been a long time since I've heard an entire cinema gasp in genuine shock at one sequence and it's almost as shocking second time round on the small screen when you know what's coming. On the surface it's a fairly typical French film, but it's what's under the surface that really counts. That said, it's still a film that many dismiss as empty or dilettante filmmaking, either because it's more concerned with the fallout its mystery provokes than offering a solution or because it's just trendy liberalism. It's certainly not for all tastes.

The central premise is simple enough, as Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche's comfortable bourgeois life is put under increasing strain by a series of videotapes of the their house accompanied by childish drawings of bleeding faces. The tapes show nothing: their menace comes not from their contents but the fact that they exist. Since the drawings have to come from someone who knows the character's past, is it Auteuil's Georges' own conscience that is sending them? Or is it the filmmaker himself to provoke a reaction from his characters? Significantly the tapes are all shot on a fixed camera mounted on a raised tripod in what must be a clearly visible position. The appearance of the second tape blocking a doorway that was clear earlier in the shot offers little else in the way of a possible natural explanation.

But the tapes are really just a Maguffin, a narrative device to push the characters and plot forward.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Jun. 2012
Format: DVD
Like a languid picnic on a hot summers day, the participants may be chasing away the ants and blue bottles whilst mopping the sweat from their flurried brows, as multiple dynamics emanate from a fixed set scenario. Lying under a total amnesiac blanket is the blue bottle in the Chablis.

This coats itself over the baked bread of modernity to probe the flaked scab which lies under the hardened crust. Then it reveals a startling picture of scuttling insects scurrying as they inhabit the brain and memory channels. Each microbe tries to reassemble the past to fit it into the present, and to create a resonating future dream all based on an innate gossamer tissue of lies.

The film focuses on how these hidden emotional undercurrents are rearranged to fit this glossy represented version of composed power point reality. Using the modern technologies of CCTV cameras, mobile phones and TV's he builds a narrative, looking at the middle class lie and the sewer that lies underneath and how the present connects directly to the past.

Our hero, is not what he appears on his TV screen persona, erudite, incisive, surrounded by the attributes of culture. In emotional reality he uses these as props to hide away from himself, and in particular his troubled conscience which each night sits him on a turning spit and then roasts him in his sweated fevered dreams over an open fire of his memories..ouch.

Each sleep mare forces him to shift from his composed daily fiction to inhabit his past life, as he beams back to a time when he set up his friend, a kid already traumatised into an orphanage, due to an inner jealousy. Not just any kid, but one whose parents were killed by the french police when they were protesting against injustice in the 1960's.
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By Philip Mayo VINE VOICE on 30 Sept. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
"Caché", or "Hidden", is about a Parisian married couple for whom life appears ideal. They are professionally successful, he as the producer and host of a TV arts programme, and she in publishing. They have one son about 13 years old, a nice house and a close circle of interesting friends. Life is more or less perfect. Then one day they receive a video tape from an anonymous source. It shows the street where they live, with their front door as the focus. The tape runs for about two hours. In it they see themselves leave their own house on their way to work, their son leaving for school. They see cars pass, pedestrians pass, and a lot of nothing happening at all. A few days later another similar tape arrives. Then another. There is nothing overtly threatening in the tapes, but someone is obviously watching them. Their life has suddenly and eerily changed.

I saw "Caché" on TV about a year ago and found it utterly intriguing, so much so that I recently I bought the DVD so that I could watch it again. The film is written and directed by the Austrian director, Michael Haneke and anyone who is familiar with his work ("Funny Games", "Amour", "The Piano Teacher") will know not to expect the usual formulaic movie style. Haneke deals in harsh realities and non sugar-coated pills. He presents us with life-like complexities and outcomes. Life is full of loose ends and unresolved questions, as are the films of Michael Haneke. But they are so much more powerful for it. The husband and wife are superbly played by Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche. The film is in French so I required the English subtitles which did not take from it in any way.

As is the case with all his work (that I have seen) everyone and everything looks normal.
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