Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £3.49

Save £4.50 (56%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Hey Nostradamus! Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£3.49

Length: 258 pages
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £3.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Audible Narration: Ready

Get a Free Kindle Book
Between now and 26 February 2016 you can earn a free Kindle Book by simply downloading and registering the free Kindle reading app, buying a Kindle Book, or buying a book. Learn more
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle ebook from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle ebooks) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at on Friday, 26 February, 2016. Terms and conditions apply

Product Description

Amazon.co.uk Review

Readers of Douglas Coupland's more recent fictions have become accustomed to encountering characters touched by tragedy, whether it be falling into comas, surviving plane crashes or becoming infected with the AIDS virus after bizarre shooting incidents. Hey Nostradamus! is no exception: a novel in four voices. The opening narrator, Cheryl Anway, is the 17-year-old victim of a Columbine-style high-school massacre. Just before she was murdered in 1988, Cheryl had secretly married her high-school sweetheart Jason Klaasen and was expecting their child. The couple were part of a zealously evangelical Christian group, Youth Alive! whose members, immediately after the slaying, falsely accused Jason of masterminding the incident.

Eleven years later, Jason is still coming to terms with Cheryl's death. He is, as he admits to his faithful dog Joyce, a "social blank with a liver like the Hindenburg… embarrassed by how damaged he is and by how mediocre he turned out". (He fits bathrooms for a living.) Jason is also scarred by his relationship with his father Reg, a religious pedant so unyielding that he drove his wife into alcoholism and who genuinely believes that one of his identical twin grandsons cannot possess a soul.

Coupland persistently dissects notions of morality, faith, belief, forgiveness and devotion here. Even Reg, who leads the very final section of the story, is a multifaceted figure whose religiosity is handled with a surprising degree of compassion. Loss, however, is the main theme, exemplified by the fact that its two main characters are absent presences. Cheryl is dead throughout and by the time Heather, Jason's new partner, takes up the narrative, Klaasen has himself disappeared. His vanishing act forces her to engage Allison, the book's dubious Nostradamus; she is a fake psychic intent on ripping Heather off, yet mysteriously in possession of cannily specific "messages" from Jason.

The book's structure, epistolatory in parts, can make the story appear unfocused; some sections certainly err toward the frenetic, incident-wise, but Coupland's tremendous wit, humanity and moral force carry it along. As ever, splutters of dates and pop trivia mingle with profound reflections on life and death; surely, only Coupland nowadays could mark the time of day with a reference to McDonalds breakfasts and pull it off. That said, there's a very slight harking back to Life After God--the cartoon characters that Heather and Jason invent do seem rather similar to Doggles, the Dog who wore Goggles, and Squirrelly the Squirrel. Nonetheless, where those stories were about the "first generation raised without religion" this moving, prescient novel takes a long hard look at those who choose God, or have God thrust upon them. --Travis Elborough

Amazon Review

Readers of Douglas Coupland's more recent fictions have become accustomed to encountering characters touched by tragedy, whether it be falling into comas, surviving plane crashes or becoming infected with the AIDS virus after bizarre shooting incidents. Hey Nostradamus! is no exception: a novel in four voices. The opening narrator, Cheryl Anway, is the 17-year-old victim of a Columbine-style high-school massacre. Just before she was murdered in 1988, Cheryl had secretly married her high-school sweetheart Jason Klaasen and was expecting their child. The couple were part of a zealously evangelical Christian group, Youth Alive! whose members, immediately after the slaying, falsely accused Jason of masterminding the incident.

Eleven years later, Jason is still coming to terms with Cheryl's death. He is, as he admits to his faithful dog Joyce, a "social blank with a liver like the Hindenburg… embarrassed by how damaged he is and by how mediocre he turned out". (He fits bathrooms for a living.) Jason is also scarred by his relationship with his father Reg, a religious pedant so unyielding that he drove his wife into alcoholism and who genuinely believes that one of his identical twin grandsons cannot possess a soul.

Coupland persistently dissects notions of morality, faith, belief, forgiveness and devotion here. Even Reg, who leads the very final section of the story, is a multifaceted figure whose religiosity is handled with a surprising degree of compassion. Loss, however, is the main theme, exemplified by the fact that its two main characters are absent presences. Cheryl is dead throughout and by the time Heather, Jason's new partner, takes up the narrative, Klaasen has himself disappeared. His vanishing act forces her to engage Allison, the book's dubious Nostradamus; she is a fake psychic intent on ripping Heather off, yet mysteriously in possession of cannily specific "messages" from Jason.

The book's structure, epistolatory in parts, can make the story appear unfocused; some sections certainly err toward the frenetic, incident-wise, but Coupland's tremendous wit, humanity and moral force carry it along. As ever, splutters of dates and pop trivia mingle with profound reflections on life and death; surely, only Coupland nowadays could mark the time of day with a reference to McDonalds breakfasts and pull it off. That said, there's a very slight harking back to Life After God--the cartoon characters that Heather and Jason invent do seem rather similar to Doggles, the Dog who wore Goggles, and Squirrelly the Squirrel. Nonetheless, where those stories were about the "first generation raised without religion" this moving, prescient novel takes a long hard look at those who choose God, or have God thrust upon them. --Travis Elborough


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 327 KB
  • Print Length: 258 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1582344159
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate (24 Jun. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0046A9MMM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #122,966 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Having recently read and revelled in Hey Nostradamus!, I have the mad-eyed messianic urge to convert about me. Well it is a novel about (among other things) religious belief...
For some reason I have managed to get this far in my reading life without ever opening a Douglas Coupland novel, possibly because I thought he would be glib and modish and too clever by half (that's Amis's job, heheh). And indeed they do say that Hey Nostradamus! is quite a change in direction for him, so maybe he was like that ... but this is a real treat: a sweet, moving, surprising and positively edible yarn about faith and love and life and death - without ever seeming forced or portentous. It was like splashing through and guzzling a delicious new brightly coloured drink and I absolutely adored it.
It concerns the long-term aftermath of a Columbine-style high school shooting, only this one took place in Vancouver in 1988. Cheryl Anway was the last one to be shot, in the school canteen, before one of the three gunmen ("gunboys, really") gets shot by one of the others, then Cheryl's secret 17-year-old husband and schoolfriend Jason bops one of the others with a rock, and the third gets crushed under a table by angry adrenaline-fuelled survivors. Just before she dies she has been writing on her school folder GOD IS NOWHERE / GOD IS NOW HERE / GOD IS NOWHERE / GOD IS NOW HERE. And so in turn we hear from Cheryl - from beyond the grave - Jason, Jason's second wife Heather and Jason's tyrannical father Reg, the sort of man who puts the mental into fundamentalist.
Read more ›
Comment 21 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Hey Nostradamus was quite different from all of Douglas Coupland's other book that I had previously read. If you're looking for another Generation X, Microserfs, etc then leave this book for the time being but do go back to it when you're in the mood for a more thoughtful and reflective Coupland.

Inspired (perhaps that's not the most appropriate word), by the events at Colombine High and more specifically, the case of one victim who reportedly refused to deny her Faith when asked by the killers to reject God, this is an interesting look at what that young girl's life might have been like leading up to the shootings.

In the aftermath of the shootings, the media, and to a similar extent the US nation, sought to make a martyr out of this girl, perhaps as a need to make sense or salvage some good from the event. The more sceptical questioned the initial accounts of the incident, resulting in considerable doubt on how the conversation between the killers and their victim actually transpired.

Coupland seems to take up this idea and writes the story of an ordinary Vancouver schoolgirl who just happens to be present in the cafeteria when a school shooting unfolds. How the event is interpreted by those in the community questions the real life incidents at Colombine and battles against the alleged media-created martyrdom. My take on it is that Coupland challenges the idea that there is often more value in the idea of how something than how it actually happened. Richard III and Boris Gudunov were probably not the evil prince-killers that Shakespeare and Pushkin portrayed them to be but we have accepted that in their cases, the myth is more valuable than historic truth. Hey Nostradamus suggests that Coupland disagrees.

Good stuff.
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I haven't read any Douglas Coupland apart from this novel, but rest assured that the minute I press "submit" on this review I'll be going down to the library to check out the rest of them!
"Hey Nostradamus" is a story told from the viewpoint of four very different people: Cheryl, the wistful teenager cut down in her prime; Jason, her guiltstricken, psychologically scarred husband; Heather, his loving girlfriend; and Reg, his religious and ultimately crushed father. After a gun massacre in the school cafeteria, the lives of all four characters are changed irrevocably.
Coupland's characters are delightfully believable and human. You find yourself caring for all of them, even the most unlikeable ones. He has a clever "Chinese box style" narrative of placing stories within stories, and using letters, etc. as a way of communicating the feelings of other, minor characters. The intricacy of the book's structure makes it a joy to read, as well as the breath-takingly intense plot.
Enjoy.
Comment 6 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Up until Girlfriend in a Coma, Coupland couldn't do any wrong for me. Miss Wyoming and All Families are Pyschotic were averag-ish, camped up, and what I imagine Carl Hiaasen would be like if I ever read him. There comes a point when I don't find it particularly novel or informative to have the names of corporate franchises inserted as generic locations - or enjoy a pulp fiction derivative script, played out by human signposts that seem as plastic as their environments.
In short, I was pretty disillusioned, and I came to Hey Nostrodamus thinking it would be where I'd finally had enough of Coupland. And that would have been a real shame for me, because I'd loved his first three novels.
But...... Hey Nostrodamus is brilliant. It manages to pull off what Girlfriend in a Coma didn't. It explores issues of faith in a secular world. Okay, so it isn't Dostoyevsky, but it manages to create characters that are fully engaging, and it's very moving. I couldn't stop reading it, which is probably the highest complimemt I could pay a book.
There is one daftish, pulp fiction bit remaining as a plot device (ie the walk in the woods with yorgo), which I won't elaborate because it might spoil the story, but that's forgivable, bearing in mind the extent to which he's managed to make the central characters live and breathe. By the end of the book they seem like real people.
I think that the essence of the story is it's good heartedness. It was a joy to read, and a real return to form. I'd put it up there with his best - which is saying a lot.
Comment 5 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions