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Hex (Or Printing In The Infernal Method) Import


Price: £8.97 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Hex (Or Printing In The Infernal Method) + Bees Made Honey in the Lion's Skull + Hibernaculum [CD + DVD]
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Product details

  • Audio CD (26 Sep 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Southern Lord
  • ASIN: B000AA4LSM
  • Other Editions: Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,302 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Mirage 1:45£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Land of Some Other Order 7:18Album Only
Listen  3. The Dire and Ever Circling Wolves 7:34Album Only
Listen  4. Left in the Desert 1:13£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Lens of Unrectified Night 7:56Album Only
Listen  6. An Inquest Concerning Teeth 5:16Album Only
Listen  7. Raiford (The Felon Wind) 7:21Album Only
Listen  8. The Dry Lake 3:21£0.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Tethered to the Polestar 4:42£0.79  Buy MP3 

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mr. R. K. Jones on 12 Jan 2006
Format: Audio CD
Appropriately released on Stephen O'Malley's [of Sunn 00)))] Southern Lord label, Hex marks the very welcome return of one of the most intense and immersive bands of the last 15 years or so. Mightily overlooked by the Nirvana kids, even though their beloved Cobain provided vocals to some early demos, Earth's output has been as sparse as this album since then... but what a return this is.
Hex is such a surprising album, the heaviosity of previous releases is almost lost, with the whole album consisting of slow brooding guitar chords. With each slow note played to almost minimal drumming and effects, you quite simply do not realise just how intense this album is, each note hanging in the air waiting for the next to come along... its almost a fragile beast. Each track merges into one and other, with, quite simply, nothing much happening at all.
And then it hits you. One simple chord played with such devestation it demolishes everything, literally everything in its path and there is no looking back. It makes the previous six [yes six] tracks undeniably worth it.
From there the album almost changes, subtely there is something mroe to the music... even a guitar solo. Yup, this is an evolution. Earth have changed once again. if you came looking for the heaviness of before, your in the wrong place thats for sure. Don't get me wrong, this album is heavy... its on Southern Lord...what did you expect? But its not the same as before. And for me, this album has pushed the boundaries of experimental metal with such a success its wonderful. Just for that one defining moment... you will know it when you feel it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amplified Man on 31 Aug 2006
Format: Audio CD
Earth, aka Dylan Carlson, basically invented the genre we know and love as `Drone'. Earth's second album, simply titled `2' was heavy, hypnotic, calming, soothing and intense all in the same contradictory sentence. It was quite unique, it has had an incredible yet subtle influence on the rock, metal and electronic music genres, evident by the Earth tribute album that came out this year.

Earth went through several phases after Earth 2. Thrones and Dominions was experimental yet lacked what made 2 so special. Pentastar was more or less a rock record, featuring a full rhythm section and vocals. 10 years after we come to Hex: Or Printing In The Infernal Method. It has been described as the soundtrack to a spaghetti western gone wrong, and that itsn't half accurate. It's a calm, mellow record yet it has undertones of despair and sorrow. You can imagine an American dustbowl with tumbleweeds and a lone mule trudging off towards the sunset with it's master slung across it's back.

The first thing you notice it the lack of distortion. I don't think I heard even a hint of distortion throughout this record. It's meat is shimmering clean guitars and ghostlike elaborate melodies, no drones, lots of sustain. Adrienne Davies, full time Earth drummer, provides the rhythms to these funereal dirgey, dreamlike soundscapes. I also noticed there is not much bass guitar here either, the mid-deeper tones are usually filled out by a baritone guitar which provides some really nice textures and tones. After all, this is what Earth is about really; texture, tone and ambience.

Hex, is a very odd record, considerably so when it's coming from a band like Earth. The western soundtrack comparison is apt, it does feel like a soundtrack as the whole thing flows really well.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Floyd Pinkinson on 2 Oct 2005
Format: Audio CD
If Jonah Hex were to bash John Wayne's head open with a rock after shooting him in the neck and then slowly drag the body across the desert this would be the soundtrack heard within the harsh sandstorms and echoing across jagged red rocky valleys.
Ennio Morricone has become a heroin addict. Merle Haggard slits his wrists in the back of a pick-up truck while White2 tears apart the speakers.
Horses hang their heads so low their necks snap. Tumbleweeds turn into dust. Cacti needles invert and blood flows...
1. Mirage
The album opens with blowing wind and minimalist reverbed clean guitar strumming setting the tone for what's to come. A short and ominous introduction.
2. Land of Some Other Order
This track begins with more clean guitars but now accompanied with slow drums and what seems to sound like a droning bass guitar or possibly the baritone guitar. Trombone is actually used in this song also. The various tones melt into each other and slide along smoothly and perfectly. Picture an outlaw on horseback approaching a ghost town up on the horizen. You'd hear this.
3. The Dire and Ever Circling Wolves
Tubular bells create the sound of wind chimes here. More plodding clean guitars and drums.There's a, dare I say, distinct country-western aura within this track and throughout most of the album. Imagine every score you've ever heard in a television or movie scene involving cowboys served a large dose of darkness and compacted into about eight minutes. It has been done here.
4. Left in the Desert
More wind and wind chimes with guitar ambience creeping in the background. A very short "intro in the middle of the album" type of track.
5. Lens of Unrectified Night
Yes, clean guitars again. Slow twanging over slow drumming.
Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
for Astro Zombie dot com-munication... 22 Sep 2005
By Floyd Pinkinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
If Jonah Hex were to bash John Wayne's head open with a rock after shooting him in the neck and then slowly drag the body across the desert this would be the soundtrack heard within the harsh sandstorms and echoing across jagged red rocky valleys.

Ennio Morricone has become a heroin addict. Merle Haggard slits his wrists in the back of a pick-up truck while White2 tears apart the speakers.

Horses hang their heads so low their necks snap. Tumbleweeds turn into dust. Cacti needles invert and blood flows...

1. Mirage

The album opens with blowing wind and minimalist reverbed clean guitar strumming setting the tone for what's to come. A short and ominous introduction.

2. Land of Some Other Order

This track begins with more clean guitars but now accompanied with slow drums and what seems to sound like a droning bass guitar or possibly the baritone guitar. Trombone is actually used in this song also. The various tones melt into each other and slide along smoothly and perfectly. Picture an outlaw on horseback approaching a ghost town up on the horizen. You'd hear this.

3. The Dire and Ever Circling Wolves

Tubular bells create the sound of wind chimes here. More plodding clean guitars and drums.There's a, dare I say, distinct country-western aura within this track and throughout most of the album. Imagine every score you've ever heard in a television or movie scene involving cowboys served a large dose of darkness and compacted into about eight minutes. It has been done here.

4. Left in the Desert

More wind and wind chimes with guitar ambience creeping in the background. A very short "intro in the middle of the album" type of track.

5. Lens of Unrectified Night

Yes, clean guitars again. Slow twanging over slow drumming. The difference between this track and the others is that seems to let a little "hope" creep it's way into the notes. But when I say a little, I mean it.

6. An Inquest Concerning Teeth

This song features banjo from what I can hear. It's rather hard to tell which of the various instruments are being used at certain points because they are sort of drenched in a clean, harmonial feedback.It's kind of amazing after listened to numerous times.

7. Raiford (The Felon Wind)

It sounds like there's going to be a standoff in front of the old saloon or some such place. Cymbals are used to create the sound of spurs over slow war drums. There's banjo and trombone with clean and distorted guitar coming up with a wild atmosphere up front while producing another layer of atmosphere with feedback below everything.

8. The Dry Lake

If you've ever heard the wind instrument used in Buddhist temples when reciting the Mahakala Tantra you'd recognize the sound the trombone carries over from Raiford.Underneath this sound is something reminiscent of the avant-jazz scores to films like The Salton Sea or Naked Lunch. Also includes tonal droning and samples of neighing horses. Short and haunting.

9. Tethered to the Polestar

Minimalist clean guitars signaling the end. Like Michael Hedges with one hundred pound weights on his arms. This continues over the drums and varied guitar sounds until the disc, unfortunately, stops spinning...

Hex; Or Printing in the Infernal Method spawns a dark, spacious, slithering, post-country doomscape. Like one giant song divided into nine tracks. It's a concept album without words. An audial framework for "something" so massive it couldn't possibly exist simultaneously with mere human beings. Earth are providing the score while forcing the listener to provide the imagery. Just be sure not to get stuck there...
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
slooooooow down there cowboy 13 Mar 2006
By R. Solomon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Hex: Or Priniting in the Infernal Method is the first studio Earth album in nearly a decade, and as most reviews will agree, a departure from the previous four. it's an instrumental album (not to be confused with instru-metal) and comes complete with a drummer. it's released on southern lord (sun o))) and stephen o'malley). I haven't heard any other earth albums but i think pentastar also had a drummer.

Firstly it's slow and i mean slooooow. There's acres of space between notes and, i haven't counted, but some tunes clock in at like 15bpm.

Secondly it's heavy but this must certainly not be confused with dark. The album draws on influences from the american midwest in particular the German Lutheran and Swiss settlers of Pennsylvania. The midwest influence is most strongly heard on "an inquest concerning teeth".

The slowness and space between notes make some songs sound like your stuck out in the middle of some open plane with nothing but endless space. Or there's "left in the desert" with the howling wind complete with chimes.

The heaviest tune "Rainford (the fellow wind)" starts of with a single drum beat for about 1 minute then a two cord repition for another minute then both are superimposed with a distorted, elongated couple of notes that become progressively more central by the time it wraps up after about 7 minutes. The reviewer above is entirely accurate to suggest this could be the song to a slow motioned shoot out in the ok carol.

This album is wicked. I wouldn't necessarily call it a metal album...in that screaming and/or anrgy sense. i'm not even sure purists would call this drone metal. But however you classify it this album really is something. you just need some patience and an empty living room to be rewarded. Do yourself a favour and at least listen to it @ your favourite store.
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
If fungus was tumbleweed 19 May 2006
By Scott Riley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Being familiar with Earth is only mildly useful in hearing "Hex" for the first time. While "Hex" normally refers to Pennsylvania Dutch symbolism used on buildings (barns) to ward off bad or encourage good, this record is just as easily the backdrop to a desert you can't even dream of.

If you've traveled (or live in) southern parts of UT, AZ, NM, and CA, the pull that one feels towards the desert is perfectly embodied in the simple and harsh notes of a single guitar. Imagine Clint Eastwood sharing a world with Stephen King's gunslinger Roland in a land that is between world's but most certainly bleak.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The windmills, 6:30 am.... 26 Feb 2008
By comedreja - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
and I'm going 110 mph but it seems like 40. This was my go to disc as I travelled the 45 minutes to Palm Springs everday. If you like the idea of listenting to country sans vocals slowed waay down with touches of Morricone thrown in for good measure then this is the disc for you.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
APOCALYPTIC WESTERN 22 Feb 2008
By J. H. Infante - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Earth has left the drone and the low guitar and bass sounds to allow this time slow and atmospherical western strings, the whole environment the sounds of Hex: Or Printing in the Infernal Method sugests are desertical, grey in times, dry, nostalgic for old american days, charming, captivating and serene, far from the heaviness of previous Earth works and less complicated in instrumental arrangments, of course I hope they return in coming albums to their basic sound but this is a great experimental and conceptuall release, Dylan Carson have made of Earth a cult band in the field of progresive drone, doom , country and western.

HM
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