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Hesitation Marks
 
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Hesitation Marks

2 Sep 2013 | Format: MP3

£9.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £15.28 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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5:22
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5:17
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5:15
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6:17
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5:44
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3:19
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5:02
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4:32
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5:31
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5:51
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7:03


Product details

  • Label: Polydor Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 Null Corporation, under exclusive licence to Polydor Ltd. (UK)
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:19:34
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00ESF6GG0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,410 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By H. Abbasi on 5 Sep 2013
Format: Audio CD
As I put on Hesitation Marks, I thought that this album would have a lot to live up to in terms of originality. I for one felt that Reznor was on an incredible creative run of brilliant ideas and vision with Year Zero, Ghosts and The Slip. Sure, those albums were not comparable to The Downward Spiral or The Fragile in terms of emotional intensity, but then nor were they supposed to be. So I half-expected this album to be a continuation of innovating the format and conceptuality rather than an epic journey exploring the depths of suicidal feelings. And I was extremely excited to hear that Reznor was "completely rethinking" NIN had been working with people like Adrian Belew.

But in actual fact, it seems that the focus of Hesitation Marks is not about world-changing sonic experimentation and technological smart-assery. Musically, there are some surprises. Reznor career-long obvious Prince influence has never been more apparent than it is in the playful falsetto of "All Time Low" or the funk of "Satellite". In a somewhat Talking Heads' Remain in Light fashion, "Copy of A" is built up gradually in layers in a way which seems more rhythmically driven than ever before. And the major-scale verse melody of "Everything" certainly comes as a shock, but after a few listens somehow falls into the category of more conventional loud NIN moments.

Much has been made of the alleged 'sparseness' of this album in contrast with Reznor's usual painstaking tapestries of sound. But for much of the album this is done in such a way which perhaps less noticeable to outsiders, as layers of all-sorts seem to quickly pile on in almost every song. The main noticeable differences are the lack of any truly face-pounding explosive rockers, and the absence of Reznor screaming hard enough to lose his voice.
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By Rhetor on 23 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I don't care about genres and sub-genres. This is simply great music!
The kind of that gets me in a very positive trance despite of its mostly pessimistic or depressing lyrics.
You don't even have to turn up the volume very much to get fully engulfed by this music

Trent Reznor isn't merely using electronic industrial sounds – he truly composes music with them. It's amazing how noise and harmonic sounds sometimes "take turns" and sometimes blend in.
I've listened to this album for an hundred times now an still discover new ingenious details – changes in rhythm or instrumentation – each time I'm listening to it.

My favourite titles are

– copy of (lyrics: "copy of a copy of a copy" is a very original metaphor. music: I like the intermissions in the beat best.)

– came back haunted (It has so much drive it feels like a two-minute punk rock song rather than over five minutes. Could easily be eight minutes long without getting boring.)

– I would for you (the melody of the refrain, as soon as you are able to grasp it, really sticks)

But more important: Threre is not one title I'm inclined to skip when listening to this truly great album
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By nin/ja77 on 2 Sep 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After making Nine Inch Nails "go away for a while" to pursue other projects such as scoring two David Fincher movies as well as working with his wife Mariqueen Manndig and Atticus Ross in his other band How To Destroy Angels, Trent Reznor has reawakened Nine Inch Nails with a brand new studio album, an album that originally started life as two tracks for a greatest hits compilation turns into a full length album "Hesitation Marks" the first since 2008's "The Slip".

The album is a lot more subtle in its approach with electronic beats creeping up on you and at times it can take a bit before the songs get going but when they do they all have slick sounding grooves, "Copy Of A" (which is currently being used to open Nine Inch Nails current tour which starts with all five members coming on to stage separately) has a very trance like beat going on with flourishes of guitar mixed in, it's an early highlight to the album. The first release from the album "Came Back Haunted" is driven by big beats and has a dance vibe throughout as well as throwing in a guitar solo at the midway point. "All Time Low" is a big slab of funk. "Everything" is the closet Reznor has ever coming to doing a pop punk number and is one of the most upbeat songs he has ever done.

"Satellite" might just be the catchiest song on the whole album after a couple of listens it will be stuck in your head and at times comes across as NIN doing David Bowies "Fame". "Various Methods of Escape" is driven by lots of beats starting of low tempo before a breakdown in the middle leads to big pounding beats that take the song to its bid dramatic climax. "In Two" features a number of vocal effects and you are never quite sure what direction the song will go in, it's a contender for the best song on the album.
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Format: Audio CD
I was very happy to know that Trent was back so soon with a whole new NIN album, and it seemed very focused and a return to the mid 90's very creative style of Downward Spiral and The Fraagile albums. Some of the album is very familar to some previous work, quite a lot is very electronic-even sounding close to Pretty Hate Machine, which many have been waiting for. These parts are great, but some of it is like a lot of the Ghosts instrumental collection or recent more ambient tunes, nothing too different or new really. There are around five or so very, very great tunes, one or two of those slightly radical and unexpected for NIN but very great. Perhaps Trent should have waited just a while longer but I hope NIN keep making more albums and tunes now.
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