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Here Come The Bombs CD

18 customer reviews

Price: £12.04 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (21 May 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Hot Fruit Records
  • ASIN: B00791VAWK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 22,692 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Bombs
2. Hot Fruit
3. Whore
4. Sub Divider
5. Universal Cinema
6. Simulator
7. White Noise
8. Fanfare
9. Break the Silence
10. Daydream On a Street Corner
11. Sleeping Giant

Product Description

Product Description

Debut solo album from the former Supergrass stalwart, delivering melodic indie-rock in the same vein as his former band.

BBC Review

It is a depressing prospect, but in just a few years it will be time to begin celebrating – definition: getting misty eyed over a dog-eared copy of Definitely Maybe and wondering why a Ben Sherman shirt purchased in 1994 no longer fits – that most exhilirating periods of British popular music, The Britpop Years.

Due reverence will be given to Noel, to Damon, to Jarvis and to Thom, as a whole host of critics and other ‘industry experts’ recall battles to get to number one, cocaine-fuelled fall-outs and a night at the BRITS when Mr Cocker invaded a stage belonging to Michael Jackson.

It’s a fair bet, though, that very little airtime will be dedicated to Supergrass, a Britpop group who take gold medal in the "Most Overlooked British Group of the 1990s" category. The Oxford trio may have sold records and concert tickets, but when it came to the attentions of the music press more column inches (and, amazingly, credit) seemed to be devoted to no-hopers such as Menswear and Northern Uproar.

A generation on and former Supergrass frontman Gaz Coombes finds himself flying under his own wing. Devoid of the collective responsibility that goes with being part of a band, the fabulously (if not quite appropriately) titled Here Come the Bombs is an ultimately welcoming but at first distant, even obscure, body of music.

It is the work of a man capable of writing pop songs while in a coma, but who now finds himself at a time in his life where such pursuits are not quite enough. Coombes has not lost his ear for a knockout melody – in this sense, his teeth are still "nice and clean" – but has developed an appetite for obscuring his choruses in swathes of music that, to the casual ear, keeps them just out of reach.

Because of this, Here Come the Bombs is an album that expects your attention. Songs such as the quietly soaring Sub Divider, the melodious White Noise, or the sparse and haunting Simulator, are not quick to reveal their full, glorious colours; for several listens they merely hint at the promise behind their facades.

But this is an album that contains a nagging quality which draws the listener back for repeated visits, and at some point the songs contained within traverse the distance between acquaintance and friendship. As such, Here Come the Bombs is a rewarding and substantial offering.

--Raziq Rauf

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Dingleberry on 21 May 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It's usually not a good sign when an artist starts thinking about their creativity too much. When Gaz Coombes announced before the release of the Supergrass album 'Road To Rouen' that we should expect a "more mature sound" my heart sank. All I could think of was that episode of Seinfeld where Jerry tells George that he thinks that he's maturing and George says, "Oh I hate to hear this".

'Road To Rouen' didn't turn out as bad as I feared and in fact had some great songs on it but the seeds of 'what are we about?' had been sown in the band's mind and ultimately produced the failed crop that was 'Diamond Hoo Ha'. After listening to that collection of songs as much as I could bear, 'Diamond' became the first Supergrass album that I didn't buy.

It seems that the Hot Rats covers album with Supergrass drummer Danny Goffey and producer Nigel Godrich have provided revitalization and inspiration for Mr. Coombes as he returns to his own songs with added vigour.

With a mixture of surprise and delight I find myself feeling that with his first solo outing Gaz Coombes has produced an album of greatest hits. Some of the songs here would sit very well on your favourite Supergrass release while others use that standard as a jumping off point to greater heights. Many of them have several parts (not simply verse, chorus, verse) and all of them build on what's gone before which increases the pleasure of each song.

It's an odd comparison but the amount of creativity here reminds me of early Genesis - like them or not, they wouldn't hold back when it came to song writing, preferring to throw every great idea that they had at a particular time into one song.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By G. A. Heiss on 24 Dec. 2012
Format: Audio CD
I don't own any Supergrass albums except Road to Rouen which was a departure for a more somber and reflective sound (so I'm told). Really liked the maturity of that album. So after coming across Gaz Coombes solo effort at such a bargain price I decided to give it a shot. As soon as I played it I put it on repeat! Energetic, spiralling music, tinged with elements of psychedelia and as someone mentioned previously early 70's prog...but definitely not a pastiche album..I think it may reflect his musical interests at present. He has a great voice, lyrically astute and the music is just full of interest.. Really like this album... A lot,
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Gary Ward on 23 May 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I expected to really enjoy this (I am very biased towards the 'Grass) and I bloomin' well did. The BBC review above is correct, it takes a few listens to fully appreciate and it clicked big style for me this very morn. I admit I'm still getting to grips with the song titles but it's early days, by the end of the summer I'll be an expert on them.

I can't recommend it enough, especially for fellow Supergrass fiends, but hopefully it will appeal beyond those borders.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Claire Dawson on 23 Jan. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Can't stop playing it! Someone needs to make sure Gaz Coombes is working on a follow up as we speak. Simulator best track,but bombs,wh*re and white noise not far behind. Be a while but will eventually replay all 6 Supergrass albums and b sides (especially the early ones).
Class album!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Gurning on push bikes, nicknames emblazoned across T-shirts carefree in their bagginess; there's something quite poignant in looking back on the Supergrass presentation of 90s youth and vibrancy. Blur have been doing the festival rounds, Radiohead have gone from strength to strength and Liam remains Liam - why is it that these more miserable purveyors of Britpop have kept their original guises more or less in tact - but the image of Gaz et al bike-bouncing vanishes further into the distance?
Tis a shame, and twas also when Supergrass finally split, over creative differences/personality clashes - whoever truly knows? The planned next Supergrass album was to be `Here Come the Drones', already hinting at the same themes present on the title being discussed.

Here Come the Bombs is an impressive album. Listening to it, I'm almost left wondering if the lack of the trademark Supergrass humour was a dividing line between Gaz and the others. Instead, it is a record that ticks along, driven by skipping bass notes beneath layers of plucked acoustics, skittish drumming and of course Coombes' voice - politicking more than pumping on your stereo.

My personal favourite track is Sub-Divider - but the first 2 give a good idea of the album's scope - from the gradually-building and understated title track to the more pulsating Hot Fruit. By the end of the album - Alright-era Supergrass will be merely a speck in your rear-view mirror. And perhaps this is no bad thing. I have not been remotely ignorant of the band's progress - fully appreciating the musical brilliance in `Take the Money...' for example - but it never occurred to me to pursue further who the driving force might be behind the band. In my mind - Gaz Coombes remained a youthful lovable 90s frontman but little else - until now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stoneageman on 7 July 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this album on a Wednesday and by the Saturday i've listened to it 5 times and i've been to work too! I would confess to being a big Supergrass fan, but i actually think it's quite different from anything they did. It would be unfair to make comparisions to them. I hope that Gaz goes on to have a fruitful solo career, on the evidence of this album, he should!
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