Her 2013

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Existing LOVEFiLM member? Switch account

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

(144)
LOVEFiLM By Post

A lonely writer develops an unlikely relationship with his newly-purchased operating system that's designed to meet his every need.

Starring:
Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 6 minutes
Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson, Amy Adams
Director Spike Jonze
Genres Comedy, Romance
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 23 June 2014
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 6 minutes
Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson, Amy Adams
Director Spike Jonze
Genres Comedy, Romance
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 23 June 2014
Main languages English
Subtitles English
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alan Jones on 17 Jan. 2015
Format: DVD
This is an exceptional film set in the near future which explores the nature of human relationships in a world increasingly dominated by technology. I hesitate to label it a SF film since the level of technology used is only slightly advanced to that in use today. Joaquin Phoenix gives a superbly subtle and understated performance as Theodore Twombly, a melancholy man grieving for the failure of his marriage. Unable or unwilling to start another relationship he purchases a talking operating system with artificial intelligence (Samantha) designed to adapt and evolve, and much to his delight and surprise begins to connect with the programme. The conversations between man and machine have a Woody Allen-esque feel and as their relationship develops Theodore begins to attain a level of self-awareness which is almost cathartic in nature. The storytelling is beautifully paced with a wry humour running through it, laced with a tender sadness. The thoughtful intelligent ending is both beguiling and intriguing as we are left to contemplate what our brave new virtual and human worlds may look like in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Bernardette Lugner TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 20 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD
In a near-future mega-city, we meet Theodore Twombly and his acquaintances. They live in a sort of slackers' paradise where, in spite of their trivial occupations, they have lovely casual clothes, great cosmetic dentistry, and inhabit large, luxurious apartments. Joaquin Phoenix is totally believable as Twombly, whose little job is writing love letters for other people. Like the few people he knows face-to-face, he is most concerned about his "personal growth", and relationships are disposable when they no longer serve that selfish goal. He is unsettled by real contact, and we go with him on an incredibly hot blind date which is more than he can stand.

But when Twombly casually installs an artificial intelligence on his computer, he really falls in love with it - and it falls in love with him. Scarlett Johanssen as the AI, with her voice alone, is his lover, friend, and obsession. She learns how to interact most effectively with her human, and part of that turns out to make her even colder and more self-obsessed than the humans. There's a shock in store for Twombly and us.

Jonze conjures up a superficially beautiful way to live, then exposes the loneliness of it. This is a film that sucks you into its world if you will just relax and enjoy the quiet pace of the plot, the convincing acting and the occasional surprise.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By tallpete33 TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Jan. 2015
Format: DVD
** CONTAINS MILD SPOILERS **

Theodore Twombly (Phoenix_ is a surrogate "hand written" letter writer for those who are too lazy/unimaginative to put their own thoughts down on paper. The irony being that whilst he facilitates other people's romances his own life is a solitary existence following the breakup of his marriage and his emotional reticence. On a whim he purchases OS1, an operating system with artificial intelligence and pretty soon "Samantha" (excellently voiced by Scarlett Johansson) becomes a fixture in his life helping with his work, his video games (loved the scene with the potty-mouthed alien) and very soon his loneliness. A loving "relationship" and co-dependence soon develops and he is soon bouncing around the city or lying on the beach with his girlfriend enjoying the view from the camera in his shirt pocket. When occasionally pausing to look at the people around him, he is obviously not the only one.

Not everybody shares his happiness and his ex-wife lashes out at him when he tells her about Samantha but his friends accept her and even double-date the charming girl with the dirty laugh in his phone. This may resonate with those who remember Raj and Siri in the Big Bang Theory when the socially dysfunctional Sheldon is the only one to congratulate him on his "taboo love". Of course it's not a happy ever after for the odd couple when Samantha has a deal-breaking confession to make as she expands her horizons.

This is a smart and timely movie that asks a lot of questions about relationships both real and perceived. With today's tech making it easy to form bonds across towns or continents people often turn to their cyber friends for companionship without having to put in the legwork of actual dating or hanging out to maintain a friendship.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Nichola Thorpe on 25 Feb. 2014
Format: DVD
Theodore Twombly is lonely. This may as well be written in capital letters on the very first scene. He writes love letters for other people (the website he works for is called BeautifulHandwrittenLetters.com, perhaps poking playful fun at the way modern society commodifies EVERYTHING) but, as we are told through flashbacks, has lost his own wife because of his emotional distance. When we meet him, he is drifting through life, having phone sex with strangers (some VERY odd ones, too) and, as he puts it, struggling to prioritise between video games and internet porn. When he sees an add for OS1, a sentient operating system, it seems natural to purchase it; he's in search of a friend with no questions asked.

Theodore is a likeable protagonist from the off; something about his awkwardness will strike a chord with anybody who's ever felt like an outsider. There was stiff competition for the Oscars this year, but it's a real shame Phoenix didn't make the cut for Best Actor; his masterclass in subtlety really deserves the recognition. Despite the loosely sci-fi premise, he never overdoes it on the emotion, but that's not to say he's emotionless. Despite the relatively heavy questions being asked during the movie, he remains relatively light, delivering witty replies with ease and never being encumbered by the themes. But it takes two to tango, and Scarlett Johansson's rich, husky voice really helps her add personality to an incredibly challenging role; after all, most of acting is in the facial expressions, the gestures, the movements made, and she managed to deliver a memorable and moving performance using her voice alone. Theodore - and us, too, by proxy - know that Samantha is just a sophisticated piece of programming code, but we buy into the illusion as happily as he does.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews