Her 2013

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A lonely writer develops an unlikely relationship with his newly-purchased operating system that's designed to meet his every need.

Starring:
Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 6 minutes
Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson, Amy Adams
Director Spike Jonze
Genres Comedy, Romance
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 23 June 2014
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 2 hours 6 minutes
Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Scarlett Johansson, Amy Adams
Director Spike Jonze
Genres Comedy, Romance
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 23 June 2014
Main languages English
Subtitles English
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
A controversial idea of what could define love and a relationship in a lonely futuristic world, that many fear we might already be heading towards. Simply a sublimely well crafted piece of storytelling, with directions I wasn't really expecting.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. Harvey on 20 Jan 2014
Format: DVD
"Her" isn't untypical of any of Spike Jonze's other films. Usually he'll super-impose a regular, human kind of day to day existential angst (typical of Woody Allen's films) onto his characters whilst simultaneously creating the oddest of templates or scenarios to act as a jarring backdrops. We might be introduced to giant, furry, neurotic Jim Henson monsters as in "Where The Wild Things Are" or the lovesick robots of his 2010 short film "I'm Here" or even to the interior of John Malkovitch's consciousness and somehow we're expected to, and quite often do, relate and sympathise with these other-worldly characters.

"Her" follows a similar M.O. and has an equally bizarre plot. A lonely divorcee, Theodore, purchases a new operating system for his computers at home and work. The OS has a female voice. Almost immediately it begins to converse with him in a flirty and intuitive way. Theo begins to use the OS for not only practical applications but as a friend, a shoulder to cry on, as a means to be happy again. As Theo and the OS's interaction progresses he begins to view the OS, "Samantha" in a new light. The OS appears to possess warmth, depth, wit and sensuality. In time Theo begins to see "Samantha" not as an "it" or a machine, but as a "her", an entity with a soul, "someone" he might be able to love.

The film, although essentially whimsical in its synopsis, offers up some rather intriguing concepts, notions and questions: Can love exist purely in the mind? Is a computer capable of feeling? Has the Western World put too much emphasis on its infatuation with technology? Will we become ever more isolated from each other as humans as machines play a bigger part in our lives?
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Bernardette Lugner TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 20 Mar 2014
Format: DVD
In a near-future mega-city, we meet Theodore Twombly and his acquaintances. They live in a sort of slackers' paradise where, in spite of their trivial occupations, they have lovely casual clothes, great cosmetic dentistry, and inhabit large, luxurious apartments. Joaquin Phoenix is totally believable as Twombly, whose little job is writing love letters for other people. Like the few people he knows face-to-face, he is most concerned about his "personal growth", and relationships are disposable when they no longer serve that selfish goal. He is unsettled by real contact, and we go with him on an incredibly hot blind date which is more than he can stand.

But when Twombly casually installs an artificial intelligence on his computer, he really falls in love with it - and it falls in love with him. Scarlett Johanssen as the AI, with her voice alone, is his lover, friend, and obsession. She learns how to interact most effectively with her human, and part of that turns out to make her even colder and more self-obsessed than the humans. There's a shock in store for Twombly and us.

Jonze conjures up a superficially beautiful way to live, then exposes the loneliness of it. This is a film that sucks you into its world if you will just relax and enjoy the quiet pace of the plot, the convincing acting and the occasional surprise.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Jan 2014
Format: DVD
*This review is for the film*

Directed by Spike Jonze (Adaptation, Being John Malkovich), 'Her' is a timely post-modern love story set in the not too distant future.

This is Jonze's first film written and directed completely from his own original script; and testament to his talent it is perhaps his best to date. The film is quite simply sumptuous in its entirety. But this is no single handed achievement for it also represents Joaquin Phoenix's (The Master, Walk the Line) most personal performance too. All set to a backdrop of vivid colour (Hoyte Van Hoytema, Cinematography) and delicate audio (Owen Pallett, Soundtrack).

Thematically the film is concerned with technology, specifically it's development and intrusion into our daily lives and habits. It can be said that (in a move that is already apparent in today's world) this technology is contradictorily disconnecting us from our actual lives culminating in isolation and loneliness. And yet our innate yearning for spiritual connection persists.

Intimately portrayed by Phoenix, 'Theodore' has made most of his journey already allowing the film to dedicate its time to his relationship with his new operating system, 'OS1', affectionately personified by Scarlett Johansson (
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