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Henze - Symphony No 8 CD


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Henze - Symphony No 8 + Henze: Symphonies Nos.7 & 9 - Barcarola per Grande Orchestra; Three Auden Songs + Henze - Symphony No 10; (4) Poemi; La Selva Incantata
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Product details

  • Orchestra: Cologne Gürzenich Orchestra
  • Conductor: Markus Stenz
  • Composer: Hans Werner Henze
  • Audio CD (30 Jun. 2008)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Phoenix
  • ASIN: B001AMM3C0
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 184,195 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

Symphonie n°8 - Nachtstücke und Arien - Adagio, Fugue & Mänadentanz de Die Bassariden / Claudia Barainsky, soprano - Orchestre du Gürzenich de Cologne- Markus Stenz, direction

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Dean R. Brierly on 17 Oct. 2008
Format: Audio CD
One of the reasons I so admire Hans Werner Henze is that he is one of the least dogmatic of postwar composers. As fiercely modern as any of his contemporaries (i.e., Boulez, Nono), Henze has never succumbed to rote formulas, nor been afraid to embrace lush tonalities and textures. The three orchestral works on this disc provide ample evidence of his chameleon-like ability to synthesize seemingly disparate movements (neo-classicism, twelve-tone technique, serialism) into beguiling musical tapestries uniquely his own. First up is Henze's "Adagio, Fuge and Mänadentanz," a musical suite based on his opera "Die Bassariden," in which Henze wields massed symphonic forces to stunning effect. Extended string passages full of dark expressionistic corners are contrasted with moments of violent uplift that tread a fine line between dissonance and tonality. Breathtaking stuff. "Nachtstücke und Arien" (Nocturnes and Arias) is another highly atmospheric work, a four-movement suite comprised of instrumental and vocal pieces. The nocturnes are lush tone poems imbued with a nervous and at times aggressive lyricism. The arias, gloriously interpreted by soprano Claudia Barainsky, are unashamedly romantic in their evocation of longing and loss. Henze indulges his taste for grand theatrical effects in his "Sinfonia No. 8" (fittingly, as it's inspired by Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream). Furiously paced, densely textured and darkly eloquent, the piece can be seen as an encapsulation of Henze's all-inclusive aesthetic. The music projects an almost overpowering scope that doesn't, however, inhibit its staggering range of emotional expression.
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Format: Audio CD
Musically good even if Henze's 8th is a slight thing compared to his 9th (!) or 7th. BUT. No liner notes or track listing, just a cover insert which is blank on the reverse. Which is a poor show.

PS the version I have is the SACD which amazon sell here

Symphony No 8 Hans Werner Henze
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Amazon.com: 3 reviews
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Modernist masterworks 17 Oct. 2008
By Dean R. Brierly - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
One of the reasons I so admire Hans Werner Henze is that he is one of the least dogmatic of postwar composers. As fiercely modern as any of his contemporaries (i.e., Boulez, Nono), Henze has never succumbed to rote formulas, nor been afraid to embrace lush tonalities and textures. The three orchestral works on this disc provide ample evidence of his chameleon-like ability to synthesize seemingly disparate movements (neo-classicism, twelve-tone technique, serialism) into beguiling musical tapestries uniquely his own. First up is Henze's "Adagio, Fuge and Mänadentanz," a musical suite based on his opera "Die Bassariden," in which Henze wields massed symphonic forces to stunning effect. Extended string passages full of dark expressionistic corners are contrasted with moments of violent uplift that tread a fine line between dissonance and tonality. Breathtaking stuff. "Nachtstücke und Arien" (Nocturnes and Arias) is another highly atmospheric work, a four-movement suite comprised of instrumental and vocal pieces. The nocturnes are lush tone poems imbued with a nervous and at times aggressive lyricism. The arias, gloriously interpreted by soprano Claudia Barainsky, are unashamedly romantic in their evocation of longing and loss. Henze indulges his taste for grand theatrical effects in his "Sinfonia No. 8" (fittingly, as it's inspired by Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream). Furiously paced, densely textured and darkly eloquent, the piece can be seen as an encapsulation of Henze's all-inclusive aesthetic. The music projects an almost overpowering scope that doesn't, however, inhibit its staggering range of emotional expression.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Absolutely great orchestral Henze! 19 Jan. 2009
By Autonomeus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The immediate appeal of this disc (which mysteriously appeared on Capriccio, then vanished only to reappear as a Phoenix Editions release...) was the Symphony No. 8. I had heard both the Symphony No. 7, one of Henze's masterpieces, and the elusive Symphony No. 9 for mixed choir and orchestra (a 1998 EMI release which seemed to immediately become unavailable), "dedicated to the heroes and martyrs of German anti-fascism," also fantastic (both are now available on this EMI 20th Century Classics 2-disc set, so of course the first recording of the 8th was a must. But while excellent, it turns out that it is surpassed by the other orchestral works here. All three are performed by the Gurzenich-Orchester Koln, led by Markus Steinz.

The first piece is an orchestral suite from one of Henze's most acclaimed operas, Die Bassariden, first performed in 1966. Henze only created this suite recently -- it was first performed in 2005 in Hamburg. The symphonic sweep partly reflects the fact that "Die Bassariden" has a four-movement symphonic structure, but much of the energy of course carries the dramatic arch of the story, the conflict between reason and emotion embodied in the fight between the ascetic King Pentheus of Thebes and the god Dionysus and his followers.

Perhaps the best of the three pieces is "Nachtstucke und Arien," (Night Pieces and Arias), which features the stunning soprano of Claudia Barainsky in the second and fourth movements. The lyrics include the line "the earth does not wish to carry a mushroom of smoke," a statement against nuclear weapons and war. At its premiere on October 20, 1957 at the Donaueschingen Festival, Henze's ostensible comrades of the avant-garde Boulez, Stockhausen and Nono walked out as soon as the lyrical and partially tonal (!!!) piece began.

Symphony No. 8 sets to three movements Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream." As you might expect, it is a lighter work than Symphonies 7 and 9, full of impish energy. Delightful if you're in the mood, it showcases Henze's facility with musical form that runs all the way back to Haydn and Mozart, and is certainly nothing likely to alienate those fearful of 20th century music.

In the liner notes (by Thomas Schulz) we find these quotes from Henze: "From the start, I had this ardent desire for a full and wild melodiousness." "I'm interested in music to reproduce moods, atmospheres, states of being. I don't want any completely wrapped up packets of music." Henze left Germany in 1953, at 27, for Italy, where he has lived ever since. He said he chose to "live and work independently of other people's decrees and dogmas." So he uses chromaticism or tonality as he sees fit, he knows his way around a 12-tone row but does not use them exclusively, he sees himself as combining north German polyphony and Italian lyricism (to paraphrase another well-known quote).

This is a great disc, a perfect introduction to Hans Werner Henze for the curious, and an important addition to his discography for admirers of his work. Clearly one of the great living composers, and one who should be more widely heard here in America!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Spectacular performances and sound. Symphony 8, like exercise, feels good afterwards. 1 Jun. 2014
By Joseph Kline PhD, MD - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I recently reviewed Simon Rattle's performance of Symphony 7 by Hans Werner Henze and found it to be exemplary - both the music and the performance. It wet my appetite for more. Here we have Marcus Stenz leading the Gurzenich-Orchester Koln in three more works by this talented modern composer on the Modern Times label (a label I have absolutely no knowledge of). The performance and sound are both stunning and arresting.

The album begins with Adagio, Fugue, and Dance of the Maenads, a suite from his opera Bassarids that Ernst von Dohnanyi requested he write. The Adagio is a slow, dark piece of rich sonorities, varied rhythms and styles, and grand climaxes. The Fugue is barely recognizable as any particular form, but despite moments of near-cacophony, there is a strange beauty that lies within. I find Henze to be an amazing talent. You hear such strange, new sounds and sonorities. The Dance is jarring with its fortissimos and quickly changing character. This is one extreme of modern music that keeps you on your toes trying to follow what is going on. One moment the orchestra is playing madly with maximum intensity and the next is softly pastoral, and then back to the maximum. It's a wild ride with no map. I love it!

Night Pieces and Arias are organized as such: Night Piece I, Aria I, Night Piece II, Aria II, Night Piece III. The orchestra-only, fairly polyphonic pieces are enjoyable to hear with striking, sometimes piercing sonorities. Henze uses abundant percussion (always a plus for me!) in these pieces like in most of his music. The Arias are unusual, as I have not really listened to songs that are of the modern repertoire. The soprano, Claudia Barainsky, has a beautiful voice, and the songs are less modern-sounding than the Night Pieces. Fascinating musical fare!

The "Midsummer Night's Dream" Symphony or Symphony No. 8 was commissioned by the Boston Symphony and was first performed in 1993. It is in three movements: Allegro, Ballabile (a piece suitable for dancing), and Adagio. The symphony is polyphonic with one line in constant motion and another sometimes pulsating independently. The 1st movement is full of strange, wonderful sounds and colors. Henze uses accent colors like snare drum; triangle, xylophone or celesta (I had difficulty telling which because of the surrounding sonorities). The 1st movement via WikipediA: "... derives in part from Puck's line `I'll put a girdle round the earth/ In forty minutes'." The 2nd movement is derived from the attempted seduction of Bottom. The final movement follows from Puck's line, "If we shadows have offended..."

The music of Symphony 8 is much more complex than Symphony 7 and requires more work on the part of the listener. Still, it is Henze and by definition extremely interesting and enjoyable (although more taxing, as well). The performance and sound are spectacular, which makes the disc HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!
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