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Henrys Dream [VINYL]


Currently unavailable.
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Product details

  • Vinyl (30 April 1992)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Mute
  • ASIN: B00004WS78
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 645,785 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sordel TOP 500 REVIEWER on 11 Jun. 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
One way to divide Nick Cave's albums is to separate the ones where the primary concentration is on ballads (such as The Boatman's Call and No More Shall We Part) and the ones where the primary concentration is on the uptempo and mid tempo rock songs (such as Let Love In and Abattoir Blues). Henry's Dream is very much in the latter camp.

The album is not devoid of ballads ('Loom of the Land', for example, is very good indeed) but I can't help gravitating to songs like 'Papa Won't Leave You, Henry' and 'Jack The Ripper', which defy you not to sing heartily along, and the murder ballad 'John Finn's Wife'.

At the time it came out I can remember this being described as Cave's 'American album' and the influence of blues and rock is certainly felt here. Experimenting with song forms in which loose, quasi-improvised verses lead into big choruses, Cave creates music that is deceptively loose: his lyrics are superb and highly-worked, so any apparent clumsiness is deliberate, but the craftsmanship is not as obvious here as it is on the ballad albums.

As with all of this remaster series, the sound quality is excellent, especially on the 5.1 mix, which seems to be more restrained here than on some of the other albums but which really shines on tracks where the Bad Seeds chip in with additional vocals. The 38-minute documentary gives a decent slab of analysis, although the amount of time devoted to telling you about production difficulties seems strange when the final master is so satisfactory. The package includes live versions of 'The Good Son', 'The Mercy Seat', 'The Ship Song', 'The Carny' and 'I Had A Dream, Joe', and a couple of other bonus tracks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Feb. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A brilliant jig along with a poked eye slithering on the end of a pointed stick as the small town lives of tumbleweed blow across a prairie wind evoking the blank desert in a series of song blasts. Cave takes the gospel stance of the pulpit being bashed and splintered in galloping tunes where he evokes the Dream. But as always these peter out into a dark night mare. However this is not all Faulkner and gothic weirdness.

Straight to you is a love song which runs straight edged into something positive occuring on a Nick Cave album, a song untainted with the whiff of necrophilia. Whilst the cup being empty is another crowd roarer as he retreats back to the lecturn albeit leaning over the ledge and sinking into despair. the lyrics operate as a narrated rapport about life brimming over into nihilism. Penniless the desire to lock away heartache is rendered in prose.

Christina the Astonishing brings to the fore an early Catholic Saint, the patron saint of lunacy - someone who died at 21 and who became resurrected with stories about life after death. Eventually she lived until 74 after smelling the sin in the other person. A paen to the surreal leads to "when I first came to this town." A beautiful haunting song which could have been sung by Glen Campbell way back in the 1970's except the sense of doom and foreboding hovers like a heavy BO scent throughout the whole blast of strings and slide guitar. The clicking cowboy boots are forever spurred onwards to the next hope after the world is shattered within the present. Reminds me of the book "Of mice and men."

Then it is up onto the floor to throw the bodies around to John Finn's wife, a song which is waiting to be born as it hits the ribs of a murder ballad brimming with lust and paranoia.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mr. T. J. Armitage on 30 May 2001
Format: Audio CD
After the mellow and swirling ballads of his previous album The Good Son Nick returns to his former bite and epic balladeering in the literary tradition of Edgar Allen Poe and William Burroughs. The lyrics on this album are superb and full of nightmarish imagery and biblical cadences and the music is varied and urgent with the Bad Seeds more than earning their keep. The title track is the opener and still sounds likme a cast iron classic with its singalong chorus and apocalyptic verses of violence and despair. After a frantic and enjoyable I Had a Dream Joe Nick makes an assay on the love ballad in which he has become a modern master. Straight To You anticipates the intimacy and prophecy of the songs on The Boatman's Call. A great growly huge hearted ballad of passion and pain that ranks among his finest songs. Cave takes the American Brother Can You Spare a Dime? folk sentiment and upends it in a glorious drinking song Shane McGowan would have been proud of. The album continues to mingle the spirit of The Pogues,Tom Waits and the holy ghost with the eerie Christina The Astonishing and the ultimate persection of the outsider turned mutderer number When I Frist Came to Town. This theme has become embedded in Cave's world and feature heavily in his novel The Ass Saw The Angel written just before this collection. John Finn's wife is a cracking Murder Ballad with "legs like scissors and butcher's knives" she arouses blood in the eyes of the narrator who of course kills the haples Mr.Finn. The Loom of the Land is a lilting and evocative travelling tune that surprisingly doesn't end in carnage. It provides a welcome contrast from the final track Jack The Ripper which is a lugubrious tune about a henpecked husband whose wife screams rape every time he comes near.Read more ›
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