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Heinrich von Herzogenberg: Symphonies 1 & 2 CD


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Frequently Bought Together

Heinrich von Herzogenberg: Symphonies 1 & 2 + Von Herzogenberg: Violin Concerto (Violin Concerto In A/ Odysseus/ Symphony For Large Orchestra)
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Product details

  • Audio CD (26 Feb 2007)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Cpo
  • ASIN: B000M2EBVK
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 331,228 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 50: I. Adagio - AllegroNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra18:44Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 50: II. Adagio ma non troppoNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra 9:54Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 50: III. Allegro agitatoNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra 6:13£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 50: IV. AllegroNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra 7:25£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 70: I. AllegroNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra11:22Album Only
Listen  6. Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 70: II. Andante quasi allegrettoNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra 6:09£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 70: III. Allegro moderatoNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra 6:16£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 70: IV. Allegro con brioNorth German Radio Philharmonic Orchestra10:58Album Only

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Peacock on 29 May 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Herzogenberg was labelled by his detractors as a Brahmsian epigone; this accusation plagued him even in his own lifetime - and no-one was more painfully conscious of that (and of the stylistic similarities between his own music and that of Brahms) than Herzogenberg himself. For myself, I find that the chamber music shows Herzogenberg at his closest to his more famous colleague; apart from the generally conservative cast of these two symphonies, I think his sound world here is often quite distinct from that of Brahms.

Certainly, on account of its sheer theatricality, I couldn't imagine Brahms writing a coda quite like that to first movement of the C minor symphony; it's a stirring passage, even awe-inspiring if you are listening in a generous mood, although the final few bars don't quite fulfil the expectations that have been raised. On the whole both symphonies have finely wrought, sonata form opening movements. The music isn't without a certain earnestness at times, even an awkwardness occasionally too - you sort of feel that Herzogenberg knew where he was starting from and where he wanted to end up, but that he wasn't always convinced of the best way to get there. For that reason, there isn't quite the same organic feeling to his sonata form movements that you get in someone like Brahms (to make a rather invidious comparison).

Herzogenberg might well be a second-rank composer, but his music is attractive without lapsing into the trivial or lightweight; it also has a seriousness to it that doesn't sound academic or worthily dull. I believe there are other recordings of his music to come from CPO, but in the meantime I can only second the other reviewer's recommendation of these fine and thoughtful works.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J Scott Morrison HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 13 Mar 2007
Format: Audio CD
Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900) was a conservative Berlin composer initially influenced by Schumann and later by Brahms. He was in conflict with the Wagnerism of his day. He was also influenced by the eminent Bach scholar Philipp Spitta. He wrote eight symphonies. The first he wrote, not numbered but subtitled 'Odysseus', was early. The symphonies heard here, Nos. 1 and 2, weren't written until he was in his forties. He also wrote five other unpublished symphonies about which I know nothing except to suspect they were early attempts to master symphonic form and orchestration. One hopes though, on the basis of the present recording, that they are later works and of a piece with the two heard here; if so, I'd strongly urge cpo, whose efforts in recording unknown works of central European composers of the late Romantic period are admirable, to dig them up and give them a go.

Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 50, is a fully-formed, mature symphony which has some points of reference to Brahms's own first symphony including its key signature. But it soon becomes clear that this is an individual voice, one that strays from the Brahmsian mold frequently. This is most evident in such things as the almost light-hearted third movement which seems to look forward to Bruckner scherzi without the sometimes leaden galumphing of the latter composer. The second movement Adagio is notable for its noble themes, including a particularly engaging second theme consisting primarily of brass fanfares, played beautifully here by the NDR Philharmonic under Frank Beermann. Brahms's influence is most apparent in the outer movements in which appealing themes are handled in an almost classical manner. The finale ends triumphantly in a blaze of brass chords decorated with glinting string and woodwind.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
Not a Brahms Clone 6 Mar 2007
By Kenneth Gilman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Many German / Austrian composers who were contemporaries of Brahms were accused of immitating the master. Not something many composers would want to do considering that many people had little use for Brahms at the time (Tchaikovsky, the New German school of Liszt & Wagner, an audience in Boston that almost rioted when told they were going to have to sit thru a Brahms symphony). These symphonies of Herzogenberg (like those of Gernsheim) were also denigrated as immitations of Brahms. They aren't. The first symphony is so so, made up of material from an earlier work, it seems to be something of a trial run. Not bad, just not inspired. The second symphony, however, is worth the price of the whole cd. It is a remarkable mix of slightly Eastern European sounding folk like melodies, gentle Joachim Raff type melodies, a touch of what sounds like Oriental - Turkish - Jannisary music & shades of Aaron Copeland (long before Copeland's day). A unique mix you'll agree. I hope more of his symphonies will be forthcoming from CPO.
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
A Worthy Issue 13 Mar 2007
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900) was a conservative Berlin composer initially influenced by Schumann and later by Brahms. He was in conflict with the Wagnerism of his day. He was also influenced by the eminent Bach scholar Philipp Spitta. He wrote eight symphonies. The first he wrote, not numbered but subtitled 'Odysseus', was early. The symphonies heard here, Nos. 1 and 2, weren't written until he was in his forties. He also wrote five other unpublished symphonies about which I know nothing except to suspect they were early attempts to master symphonic form and orchestration. One hopes though, on the basis of the present recording, that they are later works and of a piece with the two heard here; if so, I'd strongly urge cpo, whose efforts in recording unknown works of central European composers of the late Romantic period are admirable, to dig them up and give them a go.

Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 50, is a fully-formed, mature symphony which has some points of reference to Brahms's own first symphony including its key signature. But it soon becomes clear that this is an individual voice, one that strays from the Brahmsian mold frequently. This is most evident in such things as the almost light-hearted third movement which seems to look forward to Bruckner scherzi without the sometimes leaden galumphing of the latter composer. The second movement Adagio is notable for its noble themes, including a particularly engaging second theme consisting primarily of brass fanfares, played beautifully here by the NDR Philharmonic under Frank Beermann. Brahms's influence is most apparent in the outer movements in which appealing themes are handled in an almost classical manner. The finale ends triumphantly in a blaze of brass chords decorated with glinting string and woodwind.

More assured and probably worthier of inclusion at the edges of modern symphonic repertoire is the masterful Second Symphony, written three or four years after the First. It opens with a bucolic horn call that seems to set the stage for something like 'Nature Awakes' or 'Pleasant Countryside'. Thematic material is particularly memorable and both the first and very long second theme are subjected to a truly classical working out. The Andante quasi Allegretto combines two lyrically effusive themes each of which has slow triplet phrases which help make them combine easily for a beautiful effect. The Scherzo begins with a bustling low string and timpani theme that has the feel of a high-spirited peasant dance. This is a modified variation movement that goes through a number of seemingly disparate influences including some oriental pentatonics. There is a passage dominated by a slow trumpet tune primarily outlining the movement's basic harmonies, a striking touch. This movement is absolutely nothing like either Brahms or Schubert but in Herzogenberg's own unique voice. The finale initially seems like a continuation of the Scherzo but soon develops a very rich orchestration with much filigree and rushing wind and string figures. This seems an advance on anything that has occurred earlier and demonstrates that Herzogenberg has achieved true mastery of long-form orchestral composition. These last two movements are the crowning glory of the whole CD and are themselves alone worth its price. When I first heard this symphony I kept going back to these two movements, marveling at their charm and strength.

For anyone who loves music from the late nineteenth century Austro-German orchestral repertoire this issue is worth investigating.

Scott Morrison
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
A new favorite 9 Feb 2009
By S. Hansen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I've lately enjoyed exploring CPO Records catalogue that includes a great many Romantic and Modern era composers that I wasn't familiar with. This recording has almost instantly become a favorite symphony that I simply can't get enough of. Certainly there is a resemblance to Brahms, but it is only that, a resemblance. Herzogenberg has a truly original style that, while being a part of the "classic" romantic school, is one that is completely his own. What I simply don't understand is how Herzogenberg has become completely overlooked in todays music world. I can only assume that this composer's obscurity is a reflection of the current critical preference for composers like Mahler and Strauss rather that Brahms or other "classic" Romantic composers.

Sadly, right now we can only imagine what his other 6 symphonies sound like. I certainly hope that CPO has the rest scheduled to be recorded. Soon.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
A most worthy endeavour 21 Mar 2011
By Please hold the line while we try to connect you... the number you are calling knows you are waiting. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Other reviewers have expressed well the merits of this record. See J. Scott Morrison's fine review in particular. I will try to keep this brief.

CPO does us such a great service by providing the opportunity to collect the works of forgotten composers. They should be highly congratulated. We may judge for ourselves whether those composers deserve there neglect or not. Often, they come up with real gems. This is one of them.

Music: 5/5
Though the music does not quite feel as worthy as Beethoven or Brahms (few do by comparison), Herzogenberg's Symphonies are most interesting works. They clearly stand on a deft musicality and a clear understanding of Symphonic music. The First Symphony can feel slightly workmanlike at times, although this is not so of the Second. Both are permeated by good and genuine melodic and thematic material. This material is well developed. One should not be concerned that this unkown composer cannot write good music! It is unjustly neglected. This composer has his own personal idiom.

Performance: 5/5
So these musicians are not the BPO or VPO, they perform very well. They bring whole hearted advocacy to these works. This is certainly reciprocated by Beermann. Again, he is not a great conductor by any stretch but he performs his task most admirably. He and the NDR Radiophilharmonie provide very good levels of commitment and biting attack.

Sound: 5/5
There isn't quite the impact, body or presence we may ask for, though on the whole these are only minor quibbles. There is only a small shortfall on each front. The sound is generally very good. It is firm with reasonably mild resonance and good bloom. There is nothing to worry about here; the sound certainly shouldn't impede your enjoyment of this record.

Interpretation: 5/5
These are excellent readings. Beermann provides a palpable sense of discovery and freshness. He is comes across as being a strong advocate of Herzogenberg on this record. Perhaps a better conductor might make more of these works. What is clear is the sharpness of Beermann's musical mind.

Overall, Herzogenberg easily ranks along with Clementi, Bruch, Borodin and Schmidt as some of the best symphonic music outside of the central canon. I can only respond with great enthusiasm for this record. It instils in me considerable anticipation for the rest of CPO's output. Warmly recommended.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Better Than Most 11 Jan 2014
By J. R. Trtek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Herzogenberg is a nicely solid "faux Brahms" composer of the late 19th Century, and like many others of his breed -- Gernsheim, for instance -- the Brahmsian aura comes across best in his chamber works rather than his orchestral efforts. Not that these two symphonies are bad. They do have their moments, but like many "first-rate second-rate" works, they throw out some tantalizing promise but never really drop the second shoe. Of the two, I find the No. 2 more interesting in its textures and themes, but like its companion on this disc, the piece meanders just a tad and never puts a truly satisfying cap on the entire musical journey. Nonetheless, if you're looking for orchestral alternatives to Brahms and, well, more Brahms, you could certainly do much worse than these two symphonies. And, as I suggested at the beginning, to really appreciate Herzogenberg, try his chamber works.
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