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  • Heimat 3 - A Chronicle Of Endings And Beginnings [2005] [DVD]
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Heimat 3 - A Chronicle Of Endings And Beginnings [2005] [DVD]

15 customer reviews

Price: £45.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£45.90 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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  • Heimat 3 - A Chronicle Of Endings And Beginnings [2005] [DVD]
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  • Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD]
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  • Heimat - A Chronicle of Germany [DVD] [1984]
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Product details

  • Actors: Henry Arnold, Salome Kammer, Michael Kausch
  • Directors: Edgar Reitz
  • Format: Box set, PAL
  • Language: German
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 6
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 28 April 2008
  • Run Time: 750 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00153NOV8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 34,194 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Concluding six parts of Edgar Reitz's epic series chronicling the last 80 years of German history by focusing on the individual stories of ordinary people. This volume takes the story up to the momentous years between 1989 to 2000, when the collapse of the Berlin Wall led to a reunification of the German nation and an attempt to re-evaluate the nature and history of the country. Set against the backdrop of these historical forces is the personal story of Hermann Simon (Henry Arnold), now a famous conductor, who has finally reunited with Clarissa (Salome Kammer). Together they make the decision to move back to the village of Hunsruck.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. Crook on 30 May 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having watched and thoroughly enjoyed the earlier series I approached this one with a mixture of anticipation and trepidation, I'd read that the series had degenerated into some some sort of Clarissa and Hermann soap.

In fact it's an interesting view of Germany just before, during, and after reunification. While it does centre on the restoration of a house purchased by our favourite arty couple, there are plenty of new characters and a few that are familiar from earlier series. There's a return to dealing with the lives of the Simon family, using them, Schabbach and the Hunsruck to illustrate the changes in the larger Germany. The fate of Simon Optic is particularly interesting...

All in all, I thought it was both entertaining and informative. The running time means that Reitz has plenty of opportunity for developing his characters, what's so impressive is that despite the detail there's little that's boring or irrelevant.

According to my wife (who's German and from the Frankfurt area) the translation can be a little wobbly, particularly when it comes to anything that's dialect.

I thoroughly enjoyed the whole thing and these days I find a rarely care about characters in TV drama, but I did care about Heimat. Even Hermann, (who was a bit of a self centred prat in the second series) has his human side, and I was sorry to wave them goodbye. Except Clarissa, who remains as unsympathetic as ever.
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45 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. Morfey on 15 May 2008
Format: DVD
I fell in love with the original Heimat when it came out in 1984 and was televised then. It was by far the best exposition of German life during the Third Reich, and explains a lot about how ordinary Germany was taken in by the Nazis (or suffered them or enthused about them). I was left after the last episode set in 1982 that it was a shame the lives of the next generation could not be explored further.

I was disappointed by the Second Heimat because it dwelt on a generation above mine who were already leaving home at the time I was born. I felt it a self-indulgence of Edgar Reitz to dwell on his extended autobiography through Hermann.

So I was most interested when Heimat 3 carried on from the first series, in and around Schabbach, opening just seven years after the last episode, when German history was starting to get interesting again.

I thought I would miss too much the original series to enjoy something set in the 1990s throughout, but as the run progressed, I started to love some of the depths and the pathos of Heimat 3, which ran even deeper than before, as if Heimat 1 was just skimming over the surface.

Two of the characters from the first series were played by the same actors. This was a triumph to bring in Matthias Kniesbeck and Michael Kausch as Anton and Ernst. This led to some interesting make-up continuity problems, since in 1982, the actors were already playing characters 25 years older than themselves: Kniesbeck looked too young, and Kausch over made-up with his bald head. By Heimat 3, these actors had aged themselves 20 years and the characters only seven, so they both fitted well into old men approaching 70.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Susman VINE VOICE on 17 Sept. 2014
Format: DVD
This is the title for this excellent Germany series, which deals with the Socio-political themes within rural framework of Germany, during the twentieth century. Heimat is word that in meaning approximates to Homeland. This landmark series ran for 32 episodes and was written and directed by Edgar Reitz. The viewer is shown Germany from 1919 until 2000 as see the lives of a family from Hunsrück area of the Rhineland near the border with France. We are shown, almost in minutia the personal and domestic situation of their lives that is set within the wider context of social and political events that occur. The series that was made into three seasons has the signature use of switching between colour and black-and-white film to convey different emotional states.
The story continues from 1989 as Hermann returns to Schabbach and depicts the events of the period from the fall of the Berlin Wall until 2000.

This was a series that was emotionally charged as it illustrated the rural sense of belonging and the struggle that exists between the modernity of urban living and erosion of rural life. This is a series that is really worth seeing, regardless of the subtitles - as a clarification i have seen many non - english speaking dramas, movies and documentaries. I much prefer hearing the original language spoken and reading the subtitles then having the production dubbed into English, alas too often I meet people will not even try subtitled programming.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By johnwhoever on 1 Feb. 2015
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Disappointing after Heimats I and II but not without interest, and still miles better than most family dramas on TV. The main problem is that Hermann and Klarissa, having become middle-aged mainstream classical musicians since Heimat II, are insufficiently interesting to hold the drama together. Also, some of the episodes are based in a rather clichéd way around significant events in German history - the fall of the Wall, the World Cup victory, the solar eclipse - which was never the case in Heimat I. Some of the characters therefore become symbols, rather than being given time to develop and acquire depth as individuals. The highlight for me was the return of Matthias Kniesbeck and Michael Kausch as Hermann's brothers Anton and Ernst. The latter especially is impressive, and I liked the way he drives their Fussgänger / Flieger rivalry to its logical conclusion... Of the new characters, my favourite is the unorthodox East German craftsman Tobi, but Anton's bumptious son Hartmut also comes close.
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