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Heavy Horses
 
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Heavy Horses

19 Mar 2007 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 4.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
3:12
2
3:24
3
7:54
4
3:27
5
3:57
6
4:17
7
3:22
8
8:54
9
4:06
10
3:10
11
3:38

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 May 1994
  • Release Date: 27 May 1994
  • Label: Chrysalis UK
  • Copyright: 2003 Chrysalis Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2003 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 49:21
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001HXVWU6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 10,182 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Mr. D. J. Rudram on 13 Aug 2006
Format: Audio CD
Released in January 1978 and very similar in style to its predecessor Songs From The Wood, Heavy Horses to my mind represents the absolute peak of Ian Anderson's songwriting and lyrical genius. If you like brilliant tunes and superb earthy and rustic lyrics concerning amongst other things, Cats, Horses, Trains and little furry folk then this is the album for you. While playing this album you can almost taste the countryside as pure and perfect Jethro Tull tumbles out from the speakers.

With many records there is often a need to only programme in certain tracks so as to avoid poor and tuneless filler material. With Heavy Horses there is no need to do this as it is a perfect set from start to finish.

As far as I am concerned all the songs on the album are tuneful classics. Lyrically though the track 'Journeyman' is extra special and concerns Ian Anderson's observations during a late night train journey. In the song he likens a commuter's black briefcase to a dog sleeping in the draft beside the carriage door. It's genius writing, which is so clever that you can almost believe that you are on that very train. The title track 'Heavy Horses' is also fabulous and builds up gradually to a fine Martin Barre guitar solo which gets things rocking very nicely. Is it Heavy Rock music? Is it Folk? I can't really say as it defies categorisation. Let's just say then that it's perfect Jethro tull of the very best vintage.

So there we have it. A brilliant album and an absolute must for anyone interested in listening to some extremely well crafted music.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 1 Mar 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Heavier than Songs From the Wood but still exploring pastoral themes, this is one of the defining albums from Jethro Tull.
Great lyrics, superb tunes.
If you like Tull you must own this.
If you like heavy rock but don't know Tull (?), its probably their best jumping on point.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Rowe VINE VOICE on 1 Jun 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It would be easy to take a negative view of this album. Released in 1978, with punk laying low the titans of prog rock, it emerged to widespread indifference. With the zeitgeist buzzing to songs of urban and suburban alienation, anarchy in the UK and the urgent realpolitik of the street, what were Jethro Tull doing? Living up to their early 70s song title and living in the past. As album concepts go, it just doesn't get any more conservative than this. The folk instrumentation without the protest lyrics of the folk music. Songs that sneer at the spiritual vaccuum of the cities and celebrate the medieval nobility of the shire horse, the farm cat and the field mouse. Even the back cover depicts the band as "squires of the manor". A couple of decades later, John Major's speech about old maids cycling to Holy Communion through the morning mist would come to define just how laughably out-of-touch the Tories had become, but "Heavy Horses" is _full_ of that sort of sentiment. It must have seemed to rock critics back in '78 that Tull were marching to irrelevance and extinction.

Nevertheless, I fell in love to this album in the spring of 1984. While Britain was reeling under the Miners' Strike and every punk dystopia seemed to be coming true, I was on a train travelling through France, watching the Gallic countryside sweep by, listening to "Heavy Horses". And in that moment, as an understanding of just how different, how intriguingly and profoundly alien France was to England, this album soundtracked my gentle culture shock and I understood I was listening to something utterly and unmistakeably English. I've never stopped listening to it since, but where are Arthur Scargill, the N.U.M. and the angry punk movement now?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lewis Hulatt on 27 Feb 2004
Format: Audio CD
I cannot believe that nobody has yet expressed their adoration of this album on here! Perhaps it just stands for itself.
Personally, I am buying the CD album because my audio cassette tape has worn out. It has been in my car(s) for some years and although I do not claim to play it constantly (Carlos Santana, Jimi Hendrix and The Stones would object to that infidelity), this is an album I never tire of hearing.
It may be odd to see Ian Anderson these days - not the hairy fellow of the days of yore - and indeed a member of Tull changed gender - so the band do embrace change, but some periods and albums define a band. "Heavy Horses" along with "Songs from the Wood" are to me the classic albums that do so for Jethro Tull. In my collection, I may have "Crest of a Knave" and other later Tull offerings, but whatever the good qualities of 'Steel Monkey' or 'Later that same evening' - it is the likes of "Heavy Horses" that get brought out to show what a band blessed with an ear for a good tune, a soupcon of style and a dash of wit can do. A sound apart from the studious folk-rock of Steeleye Span or early Fairport Convention, a uniquely British eccentricity runs through Jethro Tull. Listen to this album and the Heavy Horses of the title are poetically evoked, still there to take you back to a simpler age.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 May 2002
Format: Audio CD
One of Jethro Tull's best albums, "Heavy Horses" combines the simplicity of acoustic folk influences with the power of honest rock music. As usual, the lyrics are well-penned, from the fun of "And The Mouse Police Never Sleeps" or the exuberance of "Rover" to the slightly sinister "No Lullaby" and the sheer poetry of the title track. Tull have seldom put their hearts into an album as much as they have with "Heavy Horses" and the results show.
Like all Tull albums, "Heavy Horses" needs a few playings to fully appreciate it, but anyone who makes the effort will be well rewarded.
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