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Heaven & Earth
 
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Heaven & Earth

YES
21 July 2014 | Format: MP3

5.52 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
8:02
2
6:51
3
5:34
4
4:43
5
5:20
6
7:41
7
4:13
8
9:03


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 18 July 2014
  • Label: Frontiers Records
  • Copyright: (c) 2014 Frontiers Records
  • Total Length: 51:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00L2XTV6S
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 84 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keith Plant on 27 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Having listened to this album twice now I'm starting to hear much more of what I would expect from Yes which gives an interesting perspective on the reviews I'm seeing here. Perhaps part of the problem is we expect so much from Yes because of the amazing past work they have done, particularly in the 70s! If this album doesn't quite have the variation we'd expect (and it doesn't) based on past triumphs like 'Going for the one' (just take the opening title track and contrast it with 'Turn-of-the-century' which comes next), then I'd still say that what we have here is an incredibly well played easy listening album with progressive overtones. The tracks are as follows
'Believe again': a really good opening track, one of the best on the album. This really flows well with nice variations in each part with a clever instrumental break with the guitar and keyboards.
'The game': nice catchy tune with some strong guitar melodies.
'Step beyond': very catchy synth lick gives a good deal of contrast to what we have heard so far
'To ascend': this is really just a nice simple song with no flashy breaks and no particular progressive overtones. Personally I find it refreshing that as a group Yes don't always feel they have to play the progressive card.
'In a world of our own': this is a bit of a change of style for Yes, something with a bit of swing which allows Steve Howe to shine on guitar.
'Light of the ages': this has what can only be described as a grandiose opening and has some nice keyboard work from Geoff Downes and some soaring guitar from Steve. Some nice and clever that time signatures keep this interesting.
'It was all that we know': catchy little track penned by Steve which has a great instrumental break in it.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Tower of power on 24 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
On my first listen through in its entirety I thought it sucked, other than the first 3 tracks. But as always with Yes albums it takes a few listens to get used to the melodies and themes. After 2 runs through the album a day for about a week I have reached the point where I LOVE this album, its life affirming stuff. A wonderful release at this stage of their career and a great achievement by this lineup. A mellow relaxing sunny day album, with great harmonies from Jon and Chris, nice keys work by Geoff and as always some lovely touches from Steve.

Speaking from a drummers perspective, Chris and Alan could really be encouraging the band to crank up the tempo at times and have at least a few tracks with a more aggressive edge to them, Alan in particular plays it a bit soft throughout for my tastes.
Quality album I'm glad it was made and I hope there is many more to come, there are some nice moments on the album and its a very enjoyable easy listen. Tis lacking a lil bit as a rock album, tho lets face it they wouldn't be rocking any more with JA in the band at this point.
IMHO its much better than OYE, Union, Magnification, FFH, Big Generator and I'd prefer to listen to H&E than 90125, sorry Rabin fans!!
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Stotty on 21 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Some people expect way too much from Yes, given the fact that they have recorded some of the greatest albums in the prog rock genre. However, Yes are as likely to record another 'Fragile', 'Close To The Edge', or 'Relayer' as Genesis are to reform and make another 'Selling England By The Pound'.
Since Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman departed (again), Chris Squire, Steve Howe and Alan White have done a hell of a job in keeping the Yes flame alive. Fair enough, band members coming and going is still a very annoying trait of this band, but fans should be well used to it by now. It's also worth noting that the previous album, 2011's 'Fly From Here' was the best thing Yes had recorded since 1994's 'Talk'.
Now, after the departure of singer Benoit David, the band have recruited Glass Hammer vocalist, Jon Davison and toured very heavily before recording this new album, 'Heaven And Earth' with legendary producer, Roy Thomas Baker. The end result is very satisfying.
Opening track, 'Believe Again' is an upbeat opener, with a great melody, memorable chorus and nice albeit, short instrumental break. 'Light Of The Ages' and album closer 'Subway Walls' are more typical, complex Yes pieces, the latter featuring some nice Hammond organ soloing from Geoff Downes.
Curiously enough, two of my favourite tracks are the more accessible numbers, 'It Was All We Knew' and 'The Game'; two wonderful tracks which show that the band can make immediate, unfussy music, with great harmonies, hooks and effortless musicianship.
The only gripes with 'Heaven And Earth' are 'Step Beyond' which veers too close to being twee for comfort and 'To Ascend', which despite being a beautiful ballad, needs expanding.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By The Soft Machine Operator TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 July 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
YES return with a new singer and a slightly different sound to their last album, FFH. Anyone expecting epics like Close to the Edge will be disappointed, as this is far more like 1990s albums like the Ladder in terms of song style. There is little of the trademark change in pace and sound within the songs that are associated with YES, but that doesn't mean it's not enjoyable. The opening track and final track are probably the most 'progressive' with the tracks between being a mix of quirky poppy songs (Step Beyond, with its keyboard riff) or ballads like 'To Ascend' which are not unlike songs like Wondrous stories from the seventies, whilst 'Light of the Ages' sounds like something the seventies band Renaissance would produce. Steve Howe contributes the catchy 'It was all we knew'.

Expect Close to the Edge and you'll be disappointed, but this is YES in mellow, acoustic mode with a few flourishes to stop it from becoming like the pop albums of the eighties.
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