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Heat: How We Can Stop the Planet Burning Paperback – 7 Jun 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (7 Jun 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141026626
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141026626
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 146,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

'cunning...winning...buy it...read it' -- Nicholas Lezard, Papberback choice, The Guardian

About the Author

George Monbiot is one of the world's most influential radical thinkers. Celebrated for both their originality and the depth of their research, his Guardian columns are syndicated all over the world. His website - www.monbiot.com - receives a quarter of a million hits a month.

He is the author of the bestselling books Captive State and The Age of Consent, as well as the investigative travel books Poisoned Arrows, Amazon Watershed and No Man's Land. Among the many prizes he has won is the UN Global 500 award for outstanding environmental achievement, presented to him by Nelson Mandela. He is visiting professor at the school of the built environment, Oxford Brookes University.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By hhodkinson on 17 Nov 2012
Format: Paperback
I have a strong interest in environmental issues and found a lot of good ideas in this book such as the ideas for reworking the UK coach service infrastructure and the fundamental restructuring of supermarkets. The supermarket idea could be further developed as an Argos style system so shoppers could still visit a supermarket, but would select their order from a screen. It is not feasible that the supermarket model could wholly shift to a delivery system, but his proposal has real potential if it was reworked somewhat. So I would recommend this book to anyone interested in ideas for emission reductions.

Additionally, I checked a lot of the references in the book and found that they generally checked out. It is in parts a well researched book but in other parts more emotion based than facts based. There is an excellent chapter on the climate change denial industry, which would be of interest to anyone who wants to learn more about the area of climate change and is confused by the fact that, seemingly "They can't make up their minds about climate change". Again, I checked these references out and they are solid.

I wanted to give it four stars, but it falls down in a few areas. For a start, he refers to an unpublished paper by a non-climate scientist to say we need to reduce emissions by 90% instead of 80%. So we have a non-scientist reviewing a paper on climate change by a non-climate scientist. He should only refer to peer reviewed papers by climate scientists and would never accept anything else from a climate change denier. I should add that Monbiot is not a scientist, but Matthew Prescott was the reviewer for this book. Writing or reviewing a paper outside your area of expertise is extremely dangerous as you often miss a critical nuance that only a trained eye could spot.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Williams on 14 Jan 2010
Format: Paperback
Heat is a hard nosed, unsentimental analysis of the problem of climate change and what can be done about it. Monbiot sets himself a difficult challenge of a 90% reduction in carbon emissions by 2030, and then tackles each source of carbon emissions in turn, from housing to transport. Some of it is familiar and easy to agree with, such as better insulation, or passive house architecture. Other sections are less comfortable reading - many popular solutions are stripped down and exposed as useless, from biofuels to small scale wind turbines. Ardent greens will find plenty to worry about as nuclear power gets a tacit nod, and the sacred cow of renewable energy gets cut down a size.

A great many ideas are discarded, but this is ultimately a book of solutions, and there are all manner of things that will work. Efficiency measures, tighter planning laws, improved coach travel, combined heat and power, hydrogen fuel cells, tele-working, internet shopping. There is no single answer, but dozens of helpful avenues that will trim carbon from our current lifestyles.

As well as the solutions, the book spends some time exploring why it has been so hard to get climate change onto the political agenda. The findings here are fascinating. A lot has been said about climate change denial and conspiracy theories. I don't have a whole lot of time for that, or for environmentalist martyrdom, but anyone tempted to dismiss those theories entirely should read Monbiot's chapter on `The denial industry.' Obviously not everyone who disagrees with climate science is in the pay of the oil companies, but a shocking number are, and there is plenty of evidence here to prove it.

As always, Heat is well researched, thorough and rational. As a guide to what can practically be done about climate change, as a society, this is second to none.
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40 of 48 people found the following review helpful By C. O'Brien VINE VOICE on 24 Jun 2007
Format: Paperback
George Monbiot of The Guardian is in any ways a more upmarket version of Michael Moore - just as determined to slay the dragons of corporate self-interest and government hypocrisy, but going about it with a little more finesse.

In this uncompromising thesis on global warming, he takes the view that carbon emissions need to be reduced by a whopping 90% if we're to avoid hitting the "tipping point" which will accelerate us towards global disaster. Having laid that on the line and debunked the oil industry- funded naysayers, he goes on to point the finger at the ones who are really responsible - us.

It's our inertia, he says, that keeps emissions so high, because once we're used to our gas-guzzlers, our long-haul flights and our out-of-season luxuries, we're far too loath to surrender them in the name of collective survival. And as long as industry keeps on burning the midnight oil, why should we bother with energy-saving lightbulbs?

Monbiot prescribes a diet of privation. If we want to avoid a forcible return to Neolithic hunter-gathering, we need to elect to ration ourselves: and cutting our energy consumption to the bone is the only way ensure a positive outcome. That means eating what's locally available, keeping our cars in the garage and evolving a workable system of public transport and food deliveries. And most of all, it means an end to globetrotting - because there's no fat and effective way to travel that's acceptably carbon-neutral.

As always, though, everyone is waiting for everyone else to act. "Everyone has to move, or no-one moves," says one supermarket boss. "If we do it and nobody else does, we're lost.
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